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Comment Re:Seriously...music off YouTube...? (Score 1) 255

Hell, when I was about 12yrs, I went into a high end audio shop at the time, and heard my first pair of Klipschorns hooked to a McIntosh tube amp...and was hooked.

When I was 12, I was doing well enough just to hit "record" on the boombox when BBC Radio 1 started playing something I wanted to keep.

(Two years later: substitute "AFN Kaiserslautern" for "BBC Radio 1," but since they were both on AM, audio quality on either of them would've been dismal by modern standards.)

Comment Re:Liberals and their insults (Score 1) 125

Eight successful years as Secretary of State.

Chris Stevens was not available for comment.

What has Trump ever done that benefited the American people?

Created who knows how many jobs, which puts money in the hands of those who earned it. People like Trump sign the fronts of checks. People like Hillary have only ever signed the backs of checks.

Comment Re:Pretty cool (Score 1) 162

In California, it's almost $50 a month for a 380W server.

Your server most likely isn't pulling 380W 24/7 unless it's running on an ancient power hog like a Pentium 4 and/or has a shit-ton more disks than usual. Mine uses an AMD A4-3300 and has four hard drives (a Seagate Barracuda LP, two WD Greens, and one 5400-rpm WD Blue...10.5 TB total) for media storage. I haven't measured it lately, but I would be surprised if it pulled as much as 100W at idle (CPU idle, drives still spinning). Even at full tilt, the CPU's only going to add another 60-65W at most.

Comment Re:Pretty cool (Score 1) 162

That ties up your phone while it's playing video, though. I bring a Chromecast with me, pre-configured for the travel router I also bring. Plug it in, connect the router to the local WiFi, fire up Plex, get access to everything I have at home. A 5-port USB charger runs everything off of one outlet (though the Chromecast can often steal power from the TV) and can still charge my phone and tablet.

Comment Re:Not sure you have a lot of options? (Score 1) 221

If you do a fresh install of Windows 7 these days? The update process is PAINFUL! You'll literally need to leave the PC downloading updates for a good 8-10 hours or more before it finally starts doing anything obvious.

That's why you slipstream updates into your installation image. Slipstreaming the various post-SP1 patch rollups as they're released will slash your installation time significantly, and there are only a relative handful of them at this point.

The only thing slipstreaming doesn't cover is updates to the .NET Framework. For whatever reason, they're not provided in a compatible format, but only as installer .exes. RT Seven Lite, however, will create an image that will run these installers (or others) in a post-Win7-installation step. It also facilitates slipstreaming the other updates, so it's useful to have on hand.

Comment Re:Are you smarter than a Trump supporter? (Score 3, Informative) 526

What I don't understand is why Clinton supporters always resort to insults.

It's all they have. They can't run on her record or her predecessor's record, they have to know their policy prescriptions stink on ice and would be about as popular with the public as pralines-and-dick ice cream...so out come the insults.

Comment Re:Coming from Detroit (Score 1) 76

There is no security on the CAN communications of any modern vehicles that I know of. Any person connected to the bus can masquerade as anyone else.

That's why Tesla has several layers of bus, with firewalls between them, inside each car.

Get on one of the buses, you get to tweak the stuff on THAT bus. But you have to convince a firewall you're cool (i.e. doing something the firewall recognizes as legitimate) before it forwards your transaction to anything on even an adjacent bus.

Comment Not quite the end of the story. (Score 1) 326

In most countries the government is in charge of health care and they have a VERY easy way to regulate price gouging such as this. In any single payer system the national health service basically sets the price they are willing to pay and that's what it costs. End of story.

Well, not quite.

In any price control regime, the authority sets the price, and there are three options:
  1. They HAPPEN to hit the "market clearing" price on the nose.
  2. They set the price lower.
  3. They set the price higher.

1. is a small target, and very hard to get right even if you're trying. (Even market economies only get there by constant feedback in the form of purchase decisions.) Further, there are strong political pressures on regulators on where to set prices, so they aren't even trying. So 1 just doesn't happen.

2. means the consumer gets gouged. (But now he can't go to some competitive supplier to get the product or service at a better price. EVERYBODY who is selling is selling at that price. So the gouging is institutionalized. The only way to get a lower price is to apply pressure to the regulators (see 1.) or go to a black market (with lots of risks, including issues of quality, reliability, contract enforcement, and bad encounters with law enforcement and the rest of the legal system).

3. is where the regulators usually end up. But a price lower than market-clearing means suppliers chose to spend their resources supplying something else, so the supply dries up. You could buy it at a sale price IF you could buy it at all. But it isn't available, so you can't buy it at any price.

A free market has its own problems. For starters, with a single supplier (a monopoly) market forces encourage gouging. With two suppliers they encourage an approximately even division of the market (a duopoly) and, again, gouging, with only price signals, not collusion, to coordinate their behavior. The incentive to engage in competition that drives the prices down to market-clearing level doesn't appear until there are three players, and doesn't become strong until there are four or more.

(Unfortunately, US regulations generally have a built-in assumption that two suppliers are "competition". Thus you get things like the landline/cable internet duopoly, or the built-into-channel-allocations local duopoly (collapsing to local monopolies) of the early, analog, cellphone system.)

Comment Knew a math professor without eyes ... (Score 1) 69

Back in the 1970s I was an undergraduate at a highly-ranked math department. One of the professors there had no eyes. (It was a birth defect - they had not formed, and his face was slightly collapsed where they should have been.)

When a student would try to skip doing some part of a rigorous proof by substituting a geometric drawing, the other profs would ask "How would you explain it to [him]?".

This guy was VERY good. But he had a "blind spot" occasionally when a graphic analogy would have pointed him to some existing proof that would apply. (I recall once when he was discussing some bottleneck in what he was working on and another professor pointed out that the troublesome piece of the problem was equivalent to an angle trisection with compass and ruler.)

Comment Re:just one thing to say (Score 4, Insightful) 610

Yeah I did. And I unlike you realize the following -

1. stripping the email address was almost certainly at a minimum an attempt to hide the fact that she was using a private server for government emails. (Something which would have gotten a "normal" person fired if not charged with multiple felonies)

2. stripping/altering the email address would have allowed them to cherry pick items - e.g. "well this email is potentially a problem, good thing it doesn't have clinton's email address on it!"

3. Later actions by the IT consultant (destroying evidence which was under subpoena) indicate the above was not simply "oooh we want to protect her private email address" rather it indicates they were looking at hiding or destroying the information.....

I dislike Trump but seriously just because he's the Republican candidate should not mean you are willing to overlook this kind of crap.
If the DNC wasn't corrupt at the core you probably would have had Sanders instead....

Comment Re:Stick a fork in.... (Score 4, Insightful) 610

You seriously would vote for someone to uphold the "rule of law" who it seems has no respect for the law???
Seriously amazing. So you are fine with one set of rules for the "elite" and one set for everyone else eh?

Trump may be slime, but at the moment I don't think there is any sort of definitive proof he's broken the law,. If there were it almost certainly would have come
out by now and be front page headlines for every news organization in the US....

Here's a thought how about the DNC replaces her with someone who has NOT attempted to break the law? Failing that how about someone who doesn't have a paper trail showing they tried??????

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