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Comment Re: These are good changes (Score 1) 75

So to be more clear, T-mobile in particular is getting rid of data caps and they are depriotitizing heavy users when towers are congested.

I'll believe that when I see it. I've never gone over my T-Mobile data cap, but family members on my plan have, and they can tell the moment it happens, regardless of whether or not they're in a congested area: immediate drop to sub-Edge speeds until the end of the billing cycle.

Comment Re:These are good changes (Score 1) 75

Binge-on isn't a data cap, it's a bandwidth limiter.

Except there still is a cap. Read the fine print. Past certain usage all your data is throttled.

If you think that 10+ phones using DASH, RTSP, etc, to try to stream an HD video (5Mbps+) out of a single 50Mbps LTE tower, isn't going to cause severe problems for everyone else using that tower, then you have a strange understanding of network protocols and video protocols in particular.

Granting your argument for the moment, artificially limiting bandwidth to 1.5Mbps doesn't help a lot. It's not like it's going to suddenly magically allow a tower to support 3x as many users, as there's other factors at play than raw bandwidth. Additionally it doesn't do anything if T-Mobile's crystal ball can't tell you're viewing video. Also additionally, the existing Binge-On has been randomly deciding non-video things are also video, and artificially limiting download speeds.

I'd also like to know where the "money making ploy" is in a system that gives you unlimited video for free if you're willing to stream it at lower, DVD-quality, bitrates.

1) The new plans cost more
2) You can pay more to use the actual bandwidth on your plan
3) You lack imagination. Once consumers are used to the idea of certain services being zero-rated on their plan, the carriers can start charging services for the privilege.
If Netflix doesn't use your data cap, and Hulu does, maybe it's not worth keeping that Hulu subscription?
AT&T has been very upfront about the fact that this is their end goal: charge both ends of the pipe. They haven't found many takers yet. T-Mobile is making the smarter play: convince the customers it's a good idea first and then the providers will have to come on board.

Comment Re: These are good changes (Score 1) 75

This argument reminds me of having to explain to junior developers why they don't need to use a binary search on an array size of 10.

Everything you have just said is correct, but none of it proves that data caps are actually necessary to combat congestion. In your theoretical example of an oversubscribed tower, limiting city users to the same arbitrary number of bytes as a rural user with a tower to themselves most of the day does nothing to help. It does make the carrier a lot of money, though.

Comment Re:Nice propaganda piece (Score 2) 472

I happen to know that even getting accepted for a BA at the IIT requires passing one of the hardest university entry exam on the planet.

Okay... based on my 30 seconds of research there are about 33k undergrads currently enrolled across all IIT schools. Assuming for the sake of absurdity they all graduated every year (when in fact, for a three year program less than 1/3 would reasonably graduate in a year), and every single one of them became an H1B worker in the US, that would still only account for half of the ~65k H1Bs issued annually. In reality they probably only make up a fraction of a percent (if any) of that workforce, as if they're that good they don't need to engage in indentured servitude. So the quality of IIT grads is not a particularly useful data point here.

Comment Re:Hahaha (Score 1) 52

Step 1: Try to use this book to fight zombies using mass produced consumer electronics starter kits

Actually it's a shame they described the book that way, as that's not all that it contains. It also has details on how to scavenge useful parts out of existing devices (car alternator, disposable camera capacitors, etc.) It's not just Pi and Arduino stuff.

Comment Re:The internation aviation standard is feet. (Score 1) 76

ressure is in Pascals everywhere outside of North America as well (where it's inches of mercury).

But "Two niner niner two" is so much easier to remember...

Likewise weather reports uses miles (both statute and nautical!), again only in this region.

Hmm are you sure it's only in that region? I know altitudes for PIREPs and SIGMETs and such are usually in feet and/or flight levels. Last I checked we parse international METARs, PIREPs, Winds Aloft, etc. the same way we do domestic ones, which would imply they're all using miles and feet/flight level...

I don't spend much (read: any) time in cockpits internationally, so it could be that pilots regularly do change their altimeter setting between Imperial and Metric (though I've usually seen it as an installer-only setting), but all the WX data that comes across my desk is in Imperial... Well, except for temperature. That's always Celsius, because the freezing point is too convenient.

Comment And This is What the FAA Foot Dragging is About (Score 1) 86

People keep wondering why the FAA is being difficult about writing rules to allow unmanned aircraft operations in the US? This is why. The DoD is falling all over themselves out of desperation to get these things in the air. They won't be satisfied until there's a Global Hawk watching every inhabited square mile of the continental US 24/7. Safety for everyone else in the air be damned.

Comment Re:1 in 1 ^ 18, Less than a bird strikes (Score 1) 233

Yes, 5-10X the size of a large consumer drone, meaning it's significantly easier to see. It also managed to pierce the fuel tank of an aircraft designed to operate in combat. A MO20 or PA28 isn't quite so hardy.

and this "controlled airspace" was one where the exercise of multiple planes in a small area...

... Was still significantly less crowded than the corridor from KDCA/KBWI/KPHL/KJFK/KBOS. Close calls between airlines and manned aircraft flying VFR where they aren't supposed to is already common enough, and although "anyone" can fly a plane (legally) very few people can afford the licensing, much less own their own aircraft. Most people could buy a DJI Phantom if they wanted to.

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