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Comment Lunar junk (Score 1) 34

If these kinds of projects become more common, is there a risk that desirable landing zones on the moon will become junkyards of project flights and expired landers and rovers?

I'm guessing not, since the moon is about Asia's size in terms of surface area. But maybe due to all kinds of reasons some zone on the moon is easier to hit or more desirable to land on, actually making it something of a problem.

Comment Re:The MS Merry Go Round. (Score 1) 211

You're completely wrong here.

If you were talking about a normal, competitive industry like cars, you'd be correct: reliability costs money, and unreliability costs customers. Detroit knows that lesson all too well. Sell someone an unreliable car, and they'll badmouth it and start looking for another car in the same price range with a better reliability reputation. This is why Japanese brands have commanded higher prices than similar American cars for a long time; it takes a lot of time (esp. in the car industry since people keep their cars for years) to fix your reputation. It's even more pronounced in other markets where the products cost less and people don't keep them as long (cars are the second-most expensive items consumers typically purchase, behind houses).

Microsoft does not operate in a competitive industry. If someone thinks Windows 10 is unreliable, what are they going to do? They could buy a Mac, but those are much more expensive than Windows machines; you're not going to get a Mac for $300 or $400. And the Mac won't so easily run their Windows software, unless they run it in a VM (like with Parallels) but then they're still going to have the same unreliability problems since that's really Windows. They could run Linux, but there again you have the software compatibility problem, and on top of that most people don't even know what Linux is. In the enterprise space, it's really worse because even though they have professional IT, those IT pros only know Windows (you'll have to lay off your whole IT department and start from scratch to switch OSes), and they run all kinds of crappy "enterprise" software that only runs on Windows.

So, since the customers aren't going anywhere (except holding out with their older Windows versions as long as possible), what incentive exactly does MS have to invest in reliability? None. It's really a waste of money for them, and hurts their profits. It's better for them to make Windows as shoddy as possible to save money (while not making it completely non-functional because then they can suffer class-action lawsuits, returns, etc.), and keep profitability high while letting the customers suffer with unreliability.

So, since the

Comment Re:How does this compare to 3d-xpoint stuff? (Score 1) 139

It's funny, but I could have sworn I read Intel actually demoing the technology at a media event, that it was already production ready and that it was beating NAND in all the significant measures, density, speed and durability.

The chatter was that it was *so* good that it was being considered as potential augmentation for RAM, allowing for huge RAM cuts in lower end devices since swapping to it would be largely indistinguishable from actual memory access on low end systems. Marginally believable as I have two SSD Skylake laptops running Win 10 with only 8 GB RAM and I've never gotten the itch to jack up RAM amounts because even generic SATA SSD makes paging transparent enough.

Or it was the next fast tier in enterprise storage, which, IMHO, has to be dreading the rise of cheap 3D-NAND largely obsoleting their tiering sales pitches and forcing primary flash storage down in price. I'm sometimes of the opinion that the latest hyperconverged trends have nothing to do with platform vendors aiming at SAN vendors but hardware vendors looking to boost profits by overselling compute by repackaging it as hybrid compute + storage.

I think the other oft-mentioned thing was that 3D Xpoint was actually going to debut in some kind of ultrabook design in Q1 or Q2 of 2017, so it wasn't necessarily going to be a technology dribbled out at high margins to enterprise markets before reaching pro-/consumer levels -- ie, someone had decided that it was all-around good enough that they could just gut the existing NAND market at once. Maybe that's just led to wishful thinking on my part, the idea that there really was a next big thing available universally and able disrupt the entire storage market.

Comment Re: Stop it with the SJW crap!!! (Score 1) 681

What's truly amazing is that AGW is apparently now somehow related to social justice, in the minds of some people.

Although I guess that's the expected end result of increasingly paranoid conspiracy theories that are needed to explain all the things that do not work as they want.

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