Want to read Slashdot from your mobile device? Point it at m.slashdot.org and keep reading!

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Check out the new SourceForge HTML5 internet speed test! No Flash necessary and runs on all devices. ×

Comment Re:Security is an illusion (Score 1) 153

There's just too much volume to track all the content everywhere.

There are 350 million people in the USA, more or less. Including kids not of age to use computers. One computer, just one, operates at billions of instructions per second (when the code is written in anything efficient, like c.) The NSA has a newish huge data center located on the main trunks.

You do the math. If you still think they can't sieve that amount of data effectively, why then, good on you for your optimism. :)

Comment Re:Trump Derangement Syndrome (Score 1) 468

Trump is assumed by some to have won based on (anticipated) EC votes. However, three facts:

1 - The EC hasn't voted yet.

2 - The EC does not have to vote for Trump.

3 - Clinton got (a lot) more votes from, you know, the people.

Trump may well end up to be president. But he isn't the president yet; he isn't even the president-elect yet.

Comment Warrants not required (Score 1) 153

They are not allowed to hack my computer even IF THEY HAVE A WARRANT, because no warrant can be granted for a computer on foreign soil.

I think what our courts would (eventually) say is that the constitution doesn't protect anyone, or anything, outside of the USA itself, and so no warrant is required in the first place.

That's pretty much the entire basis our CIA was built upon.

I'm not saying this is a good outlook; but I am saying it is the outlook.

Comment Security is an illusion (Score 1) 153

I have canceled more things than I've submitted for that exact reason.

They could have read it right off your keyboard anyway. By far the easiest place to monitor communications is at the unencrypted endpoints. If you don't want anyone to know what you're thinking, don't say it, don't enter it into a computer in any form, and don't write it down. That'll protect you. For at least a little while longer, anyway.

"Two people can keep a secret -- if one of them is dead."

Comment Then again, there are the facts (Score 1) 226

The Inquisition killed about 3,000 people over the course of 350 years.

"The inquisition" comprises a combined series of undertakings beginning with Pope Lucius III's instigation in 1184 CE and terminating in 1834 CE - a span of about 650 years. The Spanish Inquisition was one chapter of this, but by no means can be reasonably considered an isolated or peak event.

Perhaps you'll find this of interest.

Historically speaking, Christianity, between the inquisitions, the crusades, the pograms, blood libel, and just general oppression of various and sundry kinds, has a great deal of theism-based violence to answer for.

Comment Re:Not people: It's a computer problem (Score 1) 394

If you just have to punch a name into a computer and its suddenly all in front of you though, it becomes second nature to just dig into anyone you feel like -- whether or not you have legal justification for doing so. Time and money are gone from the equation.

That's a lot of words to say "Google" :)

Comment Re:DVDA for your data (Score 1) 394

Without going into detail, speaking as an engineer, one signal... many signals... the distinction is not a serious technical obstacle, other than money, which, again, not a serious obstacle to the state. Do you really believe this type of tech was only used 1:1?

The feds monitor emissions from vans, from aircraft, in vehicles, and from orbit. If they want you, they already have you. I write very high end signal processing software. I assure you this has been going on for decades. We just have better computers now. They have always had the best computers money could buy, so where we are today, they were some time ago.

It's just the way it is.

Comment Re:Can't wait to get one in my watch. (Score 1) 154

Yeah, I was thinking more in terms of 'end user does something stupid, now somebody gets to collect the plutonium dust' type problems. I suppose that the major advantage is that people are somewhat less likely to do dumb things to electronics that they'd need to cut open their abdomens to get at.

It's really the end-user/disposal problem that makes me nervous about nuclear batteries, not the 'will the engineers screw it up?' aspect. 'Sealed sources', containing various isotopes neatly packaged as radiation sources, are even simpler to implement than nuclear batteries; and generally aren't an engineering problem; but the DoE has gone to a lot of trouble hunting down 'orphan sources' that have left responsible supervision for one reason or another; and it's hardly unheard of for those to end up in some 3rd world junkyard being crowbared open by people who have no idea what a mistake they are making.

Pacemakers have the advantage of a more or less automatic paper trail(since the diagnosis of cardiac abnormality and implantation surgery tend not to be handled in cash and off the books) and people don't tend to cut through their own bodies in order to do stupid things to their gadgets; but I'd be rather pessimistic about the possibility of sound lifecycle management for nuclear batteries in broader application.

It's too bad; because they'd be extremely useful for a variety of low power off-grid stuff; but when people can't even be bothered to separate their trash from their recyclables; it's hard to be optimistic about their safe disposal of nuclear batteries.

Comment Re:Trouble turning a profit? (Score 1) 304

They are also working on developing their own self driving cars which is probably sucking up a lot of their potential profits. To say that they are unprofitable is true but a little misleading... if all they were doing was running the business instead of expanding into other business' (they could wait for google to develop the self driving cars and then buy a fleet of them) they would probably be making quite a tidy profit...

Slashdot Top Deals

1: No code table for op: ++post

Working...