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Comment Re:Outsourcing vs Inhouse (Score 1) 252

This, and the tendency for company leadership to feel outsourcing means they can offload all responsibility for project success.

Something I've seen firsthand is companies that are pathologically incapable of making important decisions internally, and that is why they bring in a consultancy. Consultants go around to the various stakeholders (who can't agree on anything), gather requirements from each, then make recommendations. Despite the fact that the recommendations are basically a micro-model of the stakeholders' existing points of view and the result is the same no-win scenario the company was facing to begin with, the recommendations are acted upon, either in whole or in part. When the result is the same mess that would have inevitably happened even before the consultancy was brought in, at least now it's the consultants' fault that their recommendations didn't work out. Managers can then stir up a big stink when it's time to renegotiate the contract, they win some petty, unimportant concessions from the consultancy, and it's time to rinse and repeat.

Comment Re:YouTube video showing BGA damage under microsco (Score 2) 222

The average iPhone user is not going to evaluate the repair on anything but the replacement cost. Disposal of the old phone is a negative cost - after all, there is a large market for broken iPhones. So sell the year-old broken phone for $100, get the "newest" phone with all the new features for $100 down payment, and the cell company just charges an extra $50 a month for a few more years.

To people who don't understand the costs of buying on credit (which are most of them) it's a new phone for free.

To the people who buy the broken or used phones, it's a bargain.

To the cell carriers who sell the new phones, and to Apple, it's a platinum-plated gold mine.

Comment Re:I don't get it (Score 1) 130

Bleeding off the excess H2 and O2 seems as wasteful as throwing away the tank itself. I would suspect that having an extra ton or two of oxygen and hydrogen wouldn't be all that hard to turn into an extra ton of H2O, which the crew might appreciate. Or if they send up multiple partially empty tanks, they could designate one tank as the recovery tank.

The tank purging process would probably be time consuming, but there should no reason to be in a hurry to convert the tank into a different usable space. Conversion is something the crew can do while under way to their final destination (with the reward of having an extra building to live in after they're all done; that should provide incentive to prioritize the task.) I would question the value of sending dedicated construction robots into orbit since the crew is already going to be there (unless the task has dangerous elements due to the residual fuel, risks of fire or explosive decompression while cutting openings into the tanks, etc.)

It definitely limits the main engines to burning hydrogen and LOX, though. There would be no way to purge a tank holding any of the other fuels they might want to use. Imagine if living in an empty diesel fuel drum was the best of the other available options.

Comment Re:Trust busting (Score 1) 256

It is far worse than AT&T bundling free phones with their service, and that got them split up into multiple companies.

If by AT&T you mean Ma Bell, then free phones? When did that ever happen? Under Ma Bell you leased your phone equipment from the phone company. Ma Bell got split up into multiple companies because it was a massive monopoly that maintained this and other predatory pricing practices.

Comment Re:Manned versus unmanned. (Score 1) 190

Right now, people are willing to wait weeks for a cargo ship to cross the ocean; those ships hold thousands of containers. But the expensive assets are unavailable during the journey. If you need them faster, your only choice is to load them on a plane, and you can have them in a day. But what about the middle ground? Is there no market for cargo that needs to arrive in three days instead of three weeks, at one tenth the price of air freight? I'm thinking that half of Amazon purchases could be shipped directly from China and arrive in four or five days, which would probably still be acceptable for most purchases. When you consider the volume Amazon ships, that's a lot of freight.

So I wouldn't discount this as a useless exercise, at least not yet. People are surprisingly clever at coming up with creative uses for all kinds of technical novelties.

Comment Re:Driving yes, but charging? (Score 1) 990

My trucks tank isn't even 20 gallons. Look, gas has a huge energy capacity per gallon and transferring a liquid into a tank is very quick. Its unlikely we will get EV charging down to that level in the near future. The question is, is it worth taking an extra 10-15 minutes a few times a year that you are going over the range in order to not pay for gas the rest of the time. Certainly a salesman in their car all day would find it onerous but for me, who would probably only need to visit a charging station 5-6 times a year, it isn't really that big of a deal.

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