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Comment Re:As a C programmer (Score 1) 276

It's not that hard, although to write a strictly conforming version requires you to be allowed to write the if statement on one line.

Simple four line version (not strictly conforming as it depends on pointer lessthan comparison) (with C99 you can put the definition of i into the for() and then #include <stdint.h> and cast to intptr_t)

size_t i;
for(i=0; i<n; i++)
    (unsigned char*)dest>(const unsigned char*)src?(*((unsigned char*)dest+n-1-i) = *((const unsigned char*)src+n-1-i)):(*((unsigned char*)dest+i) = *((const unsigned char*)src+i));
return dest;

Somewhat more contrived (and inefficient) version that only depends on pointer equality comparison.

size_t i, rev=0;
for(i=0; i<n; i++) rev = rev || ((const unsigned char*)src+i) == (const unsigned char*)dest;
for(i=0; i<n; i++) rev ? (*((unsigned char*)dest+n-1-i) = *((const unsigned char*)src+n-1-i)):(*((unsigned char*)dest+i) = *((const unsigned char*)src+i));
return dest;

Of course, this is a very contrived problem and I generally disapprove of this sort of use of ?:.

Comment I don't think that's what he did. (Score 1) 945

So you don't think the Republican candidate for the Presidency of the US inviting a foreign power, one that is at the best of times in a rather tense relationship with the United States, to hack into US systems just to gain dirt on the other party's nominee is reasonable?

It's obvious to a native speaker of English (who isn't astroturfing the Democrats' talking points) that Trump was NOT inviting the Russians to initiate a new crack on his opponent's servers.

He was ribbing his opponents, and keeping their lax security (and their "The Russians are aiding him!" attempt at distraction) in the public eye, by pointing out that the Russians probably ALREADY have the emails that Clinton's people "can't find", and inviting them to dig them out of their own archives and provide them to investigators and/or the press.

People claiming he is inviting new espionage don't just look foolish. They also play into his hands, by keeping the issue in the face of prospective voters.

But feel free to continue. B-)

Comment Re:How were crimes solved before cell phones? (Score 1) 246

As far as plastic bags go, it wasn't "some". It was "most" - maybe "all". I really really REALLY wanted to dispose of plastic bags properly, but had no way that I could figure out to do so

You can't just throw them in the trash and let the garbagemen take them away??

What's wrong with that...?

Those evil "garbagemen" take those bags and tie them around the throats of poor, innocent dolphins, you insensitive clod!

Strat

Comment Re:From where does the FAA get power to regulate i (Score 1) 44

Having a patchwork assembly of differing state and local regulations and restrictions to follow while in the air would absolutely affect interstate commerce. There's really no good rational argument against that.

Yet we have just such a patchwork assembly of differing state and local regulations and restriction to follow while on the roads: Speed limits and rules for setting them, turn restrictions, stop and yield sign placement, various rules of the road and its amenities (turn-on-red, where - if at all - U-turns are legal, lane-change frequency restrictions, lane restrictions on trucks (and no-truck routes), passing on the right, maximum durations at rest stops and activity there (such as sleeping or cooking over a fire), and a host of other rules - not to mention their enforcement) all vary from state to state.

It's dependent on each state's government(s) to pass the individual regulations. Yes, there's a lot of standardization, and following federal rules. But the federal rules are followed voluntarily when it's in a state's interest, enforced as a condition of federal funding for construction and maintenance of roads bearing US or Interstate route designations, or encouraged by federal blackmail composed of the withholding of the state's share of funds gathered by the federal gasoline taxes.

Any argument that flying at all is interstate commerce goes double for driving - where long-haul trucks, passenger cars, and even bicycles and pedestrians share common roads. So why does the Federal government have to blackmail the states into legislating their way for regional and local roads, yet can claim it has the right to totally control flight, not just of interstate traffic and/or at interstate altitudes or in the glidepaths around federally-funded airports, but of battery-powered gadgets, with range far to limited to reach a state border from most parts of a state, lighter than the average dog, and all the way down to the grass in your back yard?

Comment Re:"Unprecedented" (Score 1) 350

OOOH, you'll get done for heresy for that sort of comment. Never, ever, tell the emperor he has no clothes, all those praising him for decades will get very mad.

        BTW, the mean sea level was about 100 feet higher for most of Phanerozoic time until an enormous drop in fairly recent (on this scale) times.

Comment Re:From where does the FAA get power to regulate i (Score 1) 44

Where does the FAA claim it gets the power to regulate drones which are only engaged in INTRA-state commerce and flying too low to interfere with interstate air traffic? Seems to me that's the state's job

From 49USC app 1301 - the Federal Aviation Act of 1958 ...

No, no, no. Not what I meant.

From where in the Constitution, in the face of the 10th Amendment and Norton v. Shelby County 118 U.S. 425 (1886), does the Federal Government's Congress claim to get the power to delegate to such an executive branch agency?

Comment From where does the FAA get power to regulate it? (Score 1) 44

I'm curious:

Where does the FAA claim it gets the power to regulate drones which are only engaged in INTRA-state commerce and flying too low to interfere with interstate air traffic? Seems to me that's the state's job.

(Similarly with the FCC and radio signals that are too weak to be decoded outside the state of origin or substantially interfere with reasonable interstate services. Sure "radio goes on forever". But so does sound - with the same inverse-square law and similar interference characteristics - and we get along just fine without federal regulation of speech and bullhorns.)

Comment Re:What took them so long? (Score 1) 128

Sure, but unless you've developed a superconducting substrate, or come up with a reliable, efficient 3D cooling system, or are willing to run the 3D transistors only at very low speed/power, you're going to run into serious heat dissipation problems.

Back then I was proposing a diamond semiconductor - supported and powered by water-cooled silver busbars. Diamond is extremely conductive thermally. The bandgap is 5.5V, corresponding to the deep ultraviolet, so you can run it very hot without fouling the electrical properties (though you have to keep; it below 752 F or it will gradually degrade.) I'd want to put it in a bottle with an inert atmosphere so it wouldn't oxidize at high temperature, either.

The flip side of the big bandgap is that it consumes more energy - and generates more heat - when switching than current silicon designs which run at about a third that voltage.

These days I'd probably go for layers of graphine, which conducts heat even better than diamond.

With a rectangular solid you can get a LOT of transistors (and their interconnects) into a few cubic feet. The original proposal was for a six-foot cube - 216 cubic feet. Powering and cooling on two faces gives you 72 square feet of heat and power transfer serice, with 432 square feet on the other two faces for optical I/O fibers. Nowadays I'd take a page from Gene Amdahl and go a tad smaller: so, like the 1960s-era cabinets for IBM compter components, the block of logic and its supporting structures would fit into a standard elevator.

Comment Re:Ignorant Posters (Score 1) 117

The article has been up for over 1.5 hours with 40 posts and no one has noticed that the first link isn't actually a link.

How do I submit an application for a Slashdot editor position? I'd love to do nothing all day and get paid for it.

Dude.

This is /.

You're not supposed to read the articles. You're just supposed to post snarky comments about the OP's text!

Comment What took them so long? (Score 1) 128

The report adds that processors could still continue to fulfill Moore's Law with increased vertical density.

What took them so long?

I've been pointing out that a three-dimensional arrangement off components could continue FAR longer than an essentially single-layer arrangements since at least the 1970s.

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