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Comment Re:If the point was ... (Score 4, Insightful) 295

There's no proof that it has anything to do with Wikileaks, but in a world of IoT devices with no thought toward security, anyone who cares to do so can mount DDOS with the power of a national entity.

What's the point of doing what Assange and Wikileaks have been doing without any moral position? He isn't helping his own case.

Comment Re:Legal? (Score 2) 210

No, of course it is not legal to set a trap to intentionally hurt someone, even if you expect that the trap could only be activated by the person committing property theft or vandalism. Otherwise, you'd see shotguns built into burglar alarms.

Fire alarm stations sometimes shoot a blue dye which is difficult to remove or one which only shows under UV. Never stand in front of one when pulling the lever! But they are not supposed to hurt you.

And of course these booby traps generally are not as reliable as the so-called "inventor" thinks and tend to hurt the innocent.

Comment Seems pretty arrogant to assume "bugs" (Score 1) 202

But the things you listed aren't features of intelligence, they're bugs in our brains

Maybe they are the way an optimal system works, which is lots easier to believe than thinking they are some kind of "mistake" or de-emphization.

You remind me of guys whose first answer to seeing a complex system is always to refactor it...

Comment None of that makes sense (Score 1) 135

What, do you work for Samsung or something?

I guess we can assume you work for a company that makes external batteries since you are advocating that position...

1. Removable batteries have significant armor as they may spend time out of the device

Which means they have less battery and your phone will not last as long.

This armor would have protected the battery from localized temperature spikes.

From EXTERNAL temperature spikes, which you (and Samsung) have no idea if they are the source of the issue.

2. Removable batteries contain internal thermal and current protection, and often fusible links.

I think it's funny you imagine internal batteries do not have those features also.

The connectors cannot be tightly spaced because they must allow for movement.

Why would it matter if the connectors are close? It doesn't seem to matter to ANY OTHER PHONE MAKER.

Even if a battery short were somehow possible, the battery would have protected itself rather than igniting.

And you know that how again???

3. If there are problems with the battery, it can be returned and exchanged without the device.

Which may or may not be TOTALLY IRRELEVANT to the issues that Samsung has, the only known case where lots of people had to turn back in devices.

4. If it turns out the device is defective, it can be easily shipped without the battery and the battery saved or recycled separately.

SO stupid and pointless I can't even.

Comment In reality, hours... (Score 3, Interesting) 479

Five minutes to put in a card.

One hour plus to decide which card to buy that will work best with your system and/or local network (and by one hour, I really mean "an entire evening of reading technical reviews" if I'm being realistic).

One to five hours to fix stupid driver issues that arise because of said new card that took only five minutes to put in... for every major OS update.

Sorry man but you can't get that kind of lie past me, I used to upgrade Windows systems also. I got off that damn train so that I could live life, and spend time doing things WITH computers instead of TO them.

And as for the $500 logic board upgrade - that's after three years, otherwise it's free. Or they might just give you a new system instead.

You keep popping cards in there and rooting through your OS though like some kind of animal, if you enjoy it more power to you.

Comment Whole point of Mac Pro is better heat dissipation (Score 1) 479

As the other responder noted, the Mac Pro specifically does not use hard drives, it's all SSD (as are most other modern macs, with the exception of some iMac models).

But even if it did have hard drives, the Mac Pro design is the way it is to ditch as much heat as possible. It's a vastly better design than a box with a few holes and a fan.

Comment Re:Why? (Score 2) 479

Not sure why you think there is any distinction between patches Windows downloads automatically and the updates IT pushes out automatically.

In past experience, both have broken systems I was trying to use for work.

Basically Windows updates are just not always well behaved to the system; it matters little how they arrive.

Comment Why? (Score 4, Insightful) 479

Why call bullshit? Macs generally require less user intervention to run, and don't have automatic updates to screw things up at inopportune times. Program installation and removal is generally much simpler.

The hardware is also of much better quality than most "enterprise" computer builds, so it would last a lot longer and not have glitches...

The only people who doubt this story are those that have never used both Windows and Mac computers extensively.

Comment Yes it could be the charger board (or firmware). (Score 2) 42

The charger board itself doesn't have had to catch fire to be the source of the problem, it could simply be the thing that ended up overloading the battery such that a short while later the battery runaway heating cycle became noticeable in the form of flame...

I'm pretty sure the fires all had something to do with either the charging or power management firmware, after all batteries from two different manufactures had the same issue... plainly the issue is not the battery itself.

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