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Yahoo!

Marissa Mayer Will Make $186 Million on Yahoo's Sale To Verizon (cnbc.com) 150

Vindu Goel, reporting for the NYTimes: Yahoo shareholders will vote June 8 on whether to sell the company's internet businesses to Verizon Communications for $4.48 billion. A yes vote, which is widely expected, would end Marissa Mayer's largely unsuccessful five-year effort to restore the internet pioneer to greatness. But Ms. Mayer, the company's chief executive, will be well compensated for her failure. Her Yahoo stock, stock options and restricted stock units are worth a total of $186 million, based on Monday's stock price of $48.15, according to data filed on Monday in the documents sent to shareholders about the Verizon deal. That compensation, which will be fully vested at the time of the shareholder vote, does not include her salary and bonuses over the past five years, or the value of other stock that Ms. Mayer has already sold. All told, her time at Yahoo will have netted her well over $200 million, according to calculations based on company filings.

Comment Re:Couldn't the battery be replaced instead? (Score 2) 160

An EV battery is not some 12V with a couple leads sticking out of it. Just like an engine, it requires rigid attachment to the frame, integration with the airflow circulation, etc. It's not just sitting in some compartment that you can open up, it generally runs the length of the entire vehicle, having a meaningful impact on structural strength. The EV pack is also significantly heavier than most car engines (~500-600kg for Teslas - you can get whole cars lighter than that). And HV connectors are a lot more sensitive than just some random wire. When it comes to engineering, designing the HV connectors to survive numerous removal / reconnection connection cycles without degradation is one of the hardest parts. It's one thing to demonstrate simply swapping it once, but ensuring reliability is a much more challenging part.

Beyond that, your comparison of a car engine not designed for swapping with an EV pack designed for swapping is facetious.

Comment Re:Okay, but... (Score 2) 160

What is that website exactly? For one, it only seems to list Europe. Secondly, when you limit it to *fast chargers* (since that's what's being discussed), Tesla comes out in the middle in Europe. Lastly, the site doesn't seem to list nearly as many Tesla superchargers as Tesla itself does.Even if you only count "locations" rather than "chargers", then Tesla has 296 in Europe, while that map lists 146.

Comment Re:Sigh (Score 5, Insightful) 160

Global network.

10,000 chargers.

That's one every 5750 (ish) square miles.

Well done.

Did you seriously just divide Earth's total land area by the number of chargers? Great to know that I can pop over to a Tesla supercharger when I'm in the middle of Antarctica, Greenland or the Sahara.

Tesla Superchargers are only found in:
  * The US (not including Alaska)
  * Southern Canada (and not all of southern Canada)
  * Europe
  * Israel
  * UAE
  * Southeast coastal Australia (plus one in the west, and a couple in NZ)
  * Japan
  * South Korea
  * East China

In the US, Superchargers are spaced 50-100 miles apart along all but a handful of interstates (the latter to be added by the expansion), as well as smaller highways in more densely populated areas (many more to be added by the coming expansion). Which is more than enough to drive cross country. Note that we're only talking about superchargers; there are also many more slower chargers in place.

Comparing it to gas stations is a stupid comparison, firstly because there are vastly more cars on the road, and thus vastly more gas stations needed. But beyond that is the more basic point: EVs don't do most of their charging at superchargers. Gas vehicles must fill up at gas stations. EVs overwhelmingly don't fill up at superchargers. Superchargers are for trips.

Comment Re:Couldn't the battery be replaced instead? (Score 2) 160

Exactly this. The concept of "battery swapping" is at least as difficult as the concept of "engine swapping" (for someone else's engine, at that). It can be done, but you're dealing with a very large, heavy component critical to vehicle structure, with sensitive connections, and very high value, which high stockpiling requirements - multiplied by the number of batteries on the market. And mandating that everyone use the same battery pack will never fly - not out of stubbornness, but because different vehicles represent entirely different capacity needs, power needs, form factors, price ranges, etc, and the technology is a constantly moving target. The sort of battery you're going to put in a 2wd luxury sedan is not the sort of battery you're going to put in an electric jeep, which is not the same sort of battery you're going to put in in a sports car, which is not the same sort of battery you're going to put in a delivery truck, which is not the same sort of battery you're going to put in a motorcycle... (continues ad nauseum).

Battery swap is fun to prototype, but it's not at all practical. Faster and faster charging is the way forward. Which BTW comes inherently with increased capacity. If you go from a 100kW pack made of cells that can charge in half an hour to a 200kW pack made of cells that can charge in half an hour**, then you're going from charging at 200kW to 400kW, and doubling the kilometers-range-per-hour-spent-charging.

** - Pretending that charging is linear, rather than fast in the beginning and slow at the end, for simplicity's sake. ;)

Comment Re:Okay, but... (Score 1) 160

Freed patents are by definition not "proprietary".

Perhaps you mean "non-standard". But again, it's hard to declare Tesla to not be standard when there's more Tesla superchargers than others. And while there's a single widely accepted standard for lower rate charging (J1772 - which Tesla supports), there's a number of competing fast-charging "standards" for fast charging, so again it's hard to declare one arbitrary other standard to be "the" standard.

I'd also argue that Tesla's standard for fast charging is the best one. High peak power, compact footprint, broadly adaptable, etc.

Comment Re:Okay, but... (Score 1) 160

A lot of it simply comes down to battery size. As cells charge in parallel, then for a given cell chemistry and format, the rate you can safely charge is proportional to the vehicle's capacity. And Teslas have huge capacities compared to most other EVs (for example, the Ioniq is only 28kWh).

Now, of course, that's conditional on vehicles using the same types of cells. For example, if one vehicle is using cobalt-based 18650s and another is using, say LiPo or high-rate spinel cells, then the latter can take a much higher power for a given amount of capacity.

Obviously the charger can limit your rate. But in general the charger will be designed to max out at the maximum capability of the pack.

Comment Re:minwage $11.40-$9.90 (Score 2) 488

It basically has no impact on employment. Industries that claim they now want to replace people with automation have planned to do this before anyways. They just found a pretext in minimal wages. The fact of the matter is that wherever people can be replaced with automation, they were not the main cost-factor anyways, with very few exceptions. Hence the effects of minimal wage are just to make sure people have more spending money and that is universally good for the economy. After all, what point is there in producing things, if people cannot buy them? Of course, this only works were people have jobs, and that is where the UBI comes in. Because in the medium-term future, a large part of the demographic will not have a job anymore due to automation. If they do not have reasonable spending money, the economy collapses due to market collapse and social unrest with become an extremely expensive problem.

I do however think that many of the opponents to an UBI are those that define their worth by their jobs and these people are scared extremely by the idea that they are actually not that special. The whole argument about it "being too expensive" is bogus.

Comment Good (Score 1) 79

Now also explain and make available effective contraception, or each person saved will spawn a few more to die from hunger and war two decades down the road. Messing with natural population control mechanisms is dangerous and tricky. Not saying it should not be done, but it needs to be done right or catastrophes will ensue.

Comment Re:Germany will increase (Score 1) 76

Funny. There are not that many refugees. This is an artificially generated panic which serves to promote right-wing populists. Fortunately, in Germany they (AfD) are currently imploding, but other countries are not so lucky and the population anywhere always has a large faction that fall for the these people.

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