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Comment I now do my Linux development on Windows (Score 1) 403

One of the key changes that took place in some version of windows since I stopped using windows was that I can use the / for a directory path separator. With this change a huge amount of what I develop for linux can now be first made on Windows and then ported. It is so so so much easier to develop C++ for windows first, then fight with linux after.

I use Linux for servers extensively, and Windows server doesn't stand a chance. But I am sick of everything on Linux being a fight. Visual Studio just works. Intelisense, just works, compiling, just works. Apps install and work. yum and apt-get made installing libraries quite a bit easier, but a huge difference is that while the OS in linux often depended upon certain libraries being certain versions. Windows usually doesn't give a crap as to what Qt I have installed. Thus I install the one that I want and not worry about breaking the OS itself.

Comment Avoid the silver bullet that is Sencha ExtJS (Score 4, Insightful) 332

Wow, ExtJS brought all development to a complete multi year halt. In the first few months ExtJS development is way way way faster than any other framework out there. But after about 6 months all you are doing is fighting with the framework. Just an endless knifefight. Any single problem could be solved against the base instlall of ExtJS but what happens is that you have to develop workaround after workaround to make the system snap into place for any given need. Those workarounds then make future "easy" changes impossibly hard.

So you might have something as simple as wanting to put the focus on a login username. If you had just done the page as your first round and thought of that then, like everything with ExtJS, a little weird but fairly easy. If you already have fought with sencha to make other things happen on the login page (say a filtered twitter feed) then ExtJS is probably broken 8 ways from sunday and you can't set a focus worth a damn.

Save yourself a world of pain and just use basic javascript combined with either simple single function libraries, or worst case scenario use a framework that won't blow up your company like react or polymer. Yes, you won't be a showoff in the first few weeks of development like you could with ExtJS, but you won't blow up your company when you can't finish the project until you realize that it can only be done by throwing out ExtJS.And if you get 5 or 6 people in the company who get training by ExtJS, good luck cutting through her bullshit about how ExtJS is the best thing ever even though the project is now 18 months late.

Comment If it is small it is a lie (Score 1, Insightful) 230

Whenever I see a "battery" that is the size of a postage stamp, I scream BULLSHIT at the screen. Not once have I seen a postage stamp sized battery technology announcement turn into a real battery. I want a battery that does something "measurable". This is very very very easy to do an experiment that any observer can do some mental math and say, "whoa".

For instance. Heat 1 liter of water from room temperature to boiling. Then we can look at the battery in question and know pretty much its energy density. Then charge it in short order, and heat up another liter.

Short of out an out fraud there is no way to really mistake what energy it takes to raise one liter from 20 to say 99 degrees. Converting electricity into heat is quite efficient. Unless it is very very slow, heating up the water won't lose much of the energy along the way. Thus we can look at something and say, Ohhh it has over X Watt Hours of capacity. Cool. Then we can look at the volume and even approximate the energy density. So if it takes a battery the size of a coin cell to heat up 1 liter of water by 80 degrees then WOW. If it takes a battery the size of a car battery to do it, then not very good.

Comment Re:could just be the beginning (Score 1) 153

I would bump that up to 100%. The only times I have used Oracle in my career (which would be about 50 times) was when a client said something stupid like, "We are an Oracle House, do you use Oracle?" Then after I would swallow my vomit, I would show them a list of all the clients where I used Oracle.

Not once in my entire life have I even thought, "Oracle would be best for this." It would be like looking at my flowers in the garden and thinking, "They would grow better if I threw butter at them."

If you look at leading companies at every level of the spectrum with various data needs, none of the leaders use Oracle. Visa, Facebook, Google, etc. I don't know of any of the profitable airlines. I don't know of any of the leading banks. I have never seen Oracle in a viable finance company.

The pattern of Oracle buyers seems to be companies that want to pretend they are big. So small chains of financial advisers, franchises that are desperate to grow, small time phone companies, stupid governments. It like those fools who think that by having the fanciest Visa card that they are somebodies. No you are just a fool who paid too much for what everyone else gets for far far far less.

Comment Re:Some comments completely ignore the use cases (Score 1) 153

This is like the old BS about "Nobody was ever fired for using IBM" well Oracle is about the same as all the rest. The only time any of the major DBs lose data is during some crazy edge case. Server A was on fire, Server B had a HD failure on the raid and a bug in the raid slowed the whole system to a crawl, and C it was superbowl night and this was a NFL score keeping site.

When I do mission critical data storage, I don't just kind of throw it into any DB and hope for the best. There are logs, logs, and more logs that can be used to rebuild the datastore. There are checksums, hashes, etc. that verify that things have remained as they should be, and as truly mission critical gets reached, there are whole other systems, using whole other architectures that do the same thing and then verify the results of the primary system.

I have literally seen no realiablity difference between Oracle, Sybase, Postgres, MySQL, MariaDB, and even SQLite. Data goes in, and data comes out. If you work near the edges of any of them, then prepare to get burned. If you stay in the happy zone then things just work. To use your example of a bank, it isn't a problem to use hardware and specifications that are multiples of what is needed, keeping everything boring and safe.

If I were trying to run my banking DB from a beaglebone storing on an SD card, then I would recommend everyone switch banks regardless of DB.

Comment Sounds like a last ditch effort to get bought by O (Score 1) 153

I can't say just how much I hate MongoDB. I love NoSQL but MongoDB is made up of the most arrogant assholes to have walked the internet. Maybe Twitter was more Arrogant but I dealt with twitter less. Oracle will rip you wallet out through your asshole but at least the DB is all about just shoving data in, and taking data out. Not telling you that you should alphabetize your fields or some OCD shit that is all about telling me how to do my job.

MongoDB makes all this noise about how it is about freedom. It is like some kind of North Korean version of Freedom. Freedom to do things exactly as they have specified, and if you stray from the holy path then you are wrong and will be told you are wrong by everyone from MongoDB on every forum ever combined with the DB saying that you are wrong wrong wrong.

My dream is that MongoDB is on the ropes and that is why they are pulling this MBA shit. With any luck two things will happen. First is that the organization behind MongoDB goes completely under. But that some of the actual developers fork it, fix it, and make what was fundamentally a good idea, actually become a product that I or any developer with a modicum of talent would use.

Comment No for all kinds of other reasons (Score 4, Interesting) 241

If I ran a site about tennis and one of my users Insulted one of the various touchy members of crap country royalty around the world, I could find myself detained as I cross some border. Minimally, I could see some country like that holding me until I handed the keys over to my servers so that they could sift through them to see if they could identify the person who did the insults. Or they could just charge me.

Then there are the legions of US lawyers. I could use a link to another site and they sue me for IP theft as I linked to their site. Or defamation, or whatever shitbrained law that a US lawyer thinks they can exploit to ruin my life for a few bucks.

These are two problems that took me two seconds to think of. I suspect if you think this all the way through it won't just be sort of a bad idea, but the sort of idea that only bad people come up with.

Comment Finalize with a dealer, screw that (Score 4, Informative) 59

They have completely missed the point. I, nor just about any other human on earth, wants to have to "deal" with a dealer. Those sleazy turds are only going to give this process a bad name. If there is a way that any one of them can figure out how to screw us on this deal, then they will. Once one figures out the loophole, they all have figured out the loophole.

One of the few powers I have when dealing with a dealer is to say, FU and walk away the moment they pull their sleazy crap. But if I have made a commitment to Amazon and then have to go to some dirtbag who will own me. I might as well go there not wearing pants as it will just make the whole process of screwing me that much faster.

A tiny example of the sort of sleaze that dealers will do is to hand you a pile of forms for you to sign. They will say things like that they are required by law, or that the warranty won't be valid. But the reality is that you don't need to sign anything but the registration form that is part of the car's title. So what forms are they getting you to sign? A very common one is that you are agreeing to binding arbitration if there is any dispute about the car. Another allows them to do a credit check, even if you are paying cash. Others will look very official but are just to get detailed marketing information. These will look like finance agreements and will ask for SSN wages, employers, references, etc.

The dealers are scum, and Amazon gave me a glimmer of hope that they were going to allow us to end run them, but nope, they are just sending us to a deeper form of dealer hell.

All hail Tesla for doing its damnedest to break the backs of the dealers and their monopolistic abuses.

Comment He not only missed the problem with frameworks... (Score 1) 497

This guy is a massive supporter of frameworks as somehow a good idea. This guy is clearly someone fresh out of school or works for the government. I would say to that, all frameworks are easily the #1 thing keeping me employed. Frameworks are great if you are making a restaurant website, or an app that tells people what the upcoming plays are at your little dinner theater. Organization after organization take on a big project, One of their geniuses pulls out his favourite framework, and poof 90% of the project is done in less than a week. Then for the next two years (with an original schedule of 6 months) they are putting out shaky crap that is missing critical features, breaks all the time, and takes any new developer months to get a vague understanding of what the hell is going on.

Basically the framework is great if they are doing what the developers of the framework intended. Stray 2 feet from their intended sidewalk and you are now walking in the middle of the road. It takes bandaids, restructuring, tunnels, and magic to get to where you wanted to go.

It is much harder to, instead just choose one or more great libraries, and then handcode the whole thing into existence. Harder at the start, not harder in the end; they key being that you get to the end.

This guy has another article that talks about 9 bad habits that programmers love. One was using "goto". Nobody uses goto. Nobody in any modern programming language, doing anything modern in any way at all. Maybe there is someone who ported QBasic to android and they are using goto. I have yet to meet someone who doesn't use "goto" as the measure of a fantastically crappy programmer.

Comment Re:I have dealt with overseas IT (Score 1) 587

In my now present consulting and I see a client leaning indian, I simply say. I am not insulted. Just call me when you want me to clean up the mess,

Then, a few years later and they are calling me I ask if they have fired the person who hired the indian conpany. If they haven't I will ask if there is someone else to work with as I want to make sure things work this time. Some out and out ask if I am demanding they be fired, to which I basically say, "Or at least seriously demoted."

I usually then try to organize something informal where I say that the decision making that results in hiring an indian firm involves one or more of a small cluster of deficiencies: Fraud (very common cause), they are a moron (second common cause), or they were forced into it by someone who met one of the two previous criteria.

Comment The CBC hates reality. (Score 1) 114

One thing that drives me bonkers about CBC podcasts is that the crap advertising in the good ones clearly itemizes which of their shows have the most political influence. If I am listening to a podcast on a very specific topic, I don't want to hear out of date advertisements for their most popular general topic shows. I am 100% certain that they don't advertise the show that I am listening to during the intro to those shows favoured by the toronto psuedo intellectual elite that run the CBC.

Thus I love the podcast app that I use because it can be set to automatically eliminate the first X seconds of any podcast. For most CBC podcasts I have it kill the first 62 seconds as they are garage filler in nearly every case. Usually in those 62 seconds the various hosts say their own and each others' names at least 2-3 times

They aren't the worst. I have one tech podcast where I kill the first 3 minutes of a 22 minute podcast.

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