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Security

Wall Street IT Engineer Hacks Employer To See If He'll Be Fired (bleepingcomputer.com) 196

An anonymous reader writes: A Wall Street engineer was arrested for planting credentials-logging malware on his company's servers. According to an FBI affidavit, the engineer used these credentials to log into fellow employees' accounts. The engineer claims he did so only because he heard rumors of an acquisition and wanted to make sure he wouldn't be let go. In reality, the employee did look at archived email inboxes, but he also stole encryption keys needed to access the protected source code of his employer's trading platform and trading algorithms.

Using his access to the company's Unix network (which he gained after a promotion last year), the employee then rerouted traffic through backup servers in order to avoid the company's traffic monitoring solution and steal the company's source code. The employee was caught after he kept intruding and disconnecting another employee's RDP session. The employee understood someone hacked his account and logged the attacker's unique identifier. Showing his total lack of understanding for how technology, logging and legal investigations work, the employee admitted via email to a fellow employee that he installed malware on the servers and hacked other employees.

Comment Ah, nostalgia... (Score 1) 628

When I was in grade school, my father used to work on a mainframe computer. I was curious and used to bug him with questions, and eventually he brought me a couple of manuals. My first computer program was written on an 80-column paper form and started with "IDENTIFICATION DIVISION."

Shortly later, I joined a "computer club" and got to play around with an 8080 board with a hex keypad for input and a line of LEDs for output. That was my first exposure to assembly language and machine code.

Later, in high-school (early '80s), I got exposed to personal computers and programmable calculators. So, roughly in chronological order: 8085, TI-59 (belonging to a fellow student), BASIC, 6502 (neighbour had a VIC-20), 6509 (got my first computer: a TRS-80 CoCo)

Comment Re:The game is too one-sided (Score 1) 423

Here's an idea: Prepend a couple minutes of ads to your movies, and release them on torrent yourself, in several popular DRM-free formats and qualities. Charge your advertisers according to how many downloads each gets, and do your best to spread them far and wide. Everything becomes available for "free" for a minimally-invasive give-back (the ads) and it becomes not worth the bother to chase down actually-pirated content (which remains an incentive to keep your ads non-annoying), yet the content owner still gets paid.

Not like I want more ads in the world, just trying to come up with a win-win that won't annoy consumers into finding an alternative and doesn't require any new infrastructure or delivery method.

Comment That's all well and good... (Score 1) 236

That's all well and good that they have a lower power demand.

It however does not change the fact that Edge is a browser that wants to do everything but can't do any one thing well. The damn thing wants to be my primary PDF viewer and I've yet to have one single PDF file load in it either from a web page or from a local file. I'm also quite annoyed with the fact that it gets all pouty when you want to make something else your primary handler of a function that it wants to have control of. It begged me when I wanted to make Adobe my PDF viewer, and it pleaded when I set Opera as my browser.

And even now, any time I go to a Microsoft page it gives me that sad puppy dog look saying that I should give it another chance.

You know the look. The sad puppy that's all alone in the world...at midnight, in the cold, it's raining, on its birthday, and a larger dog stole his birthday bone.

Submission + - Investigation Finds Inmates Built Computers, Hid Them In Prison Ceiling (cbs6albany.com)

An anonymous reader writes: The discovery of two working computers hidden in a ceiling at the Marion Correctional Institution prompted an investigation by the state into how inmates got access. In late July, 2015 staff at the prison discovered the computers hidden on a plywood board in the ceiling above a training room closet. The computers were also connected to the Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction's network. Authorities say they were first tipped off to a possible problem in July, when their computer network support team got an alert that a computer "exceeded a daily internet usage threshold." When they checked the login being used, they discovered an employee's credentials were being used on days he wasn't scheduled to work. That's when they tracked down where the connection was coming from and alerted Marion Correctional Institution of a possible problem. Investigators say there was lax supervision at the prison, which gave inmates the ability to build computers from parts, get them through security checks, and hide them in the ceiling. The inmates were also able to run cabling, connecting the computers to the prison's network.

Submission + - Google Ruins the Assistant's Shopping List, Turns It Into a Google Express Ad (arstechnica.com)

An anonymous reader writes: The Google Assistant, Google's voice assistant that powers the Google app on Android phones, tablets, and Google Home, has just gotten a major downgrade. In a move reminiscent of all the forced and user-hostile Google+ integrations, Google has gutted the Google Assistant's shopping list functionality in order to turn it into a big advertisement for Google's shopping site, Google Express. The shopping list has been a major feature of the Google Assistant. You can say "Add milk to my shopping list," and the Google Assistant would dutifully store this information somewhere. The shopping list used to live in Google Keep. Keep is Google's primary note-taking app, making it a natural home for the shopping list with lots of useful tools and management options. Now the shopping list lives in Google Express. Express is an online shopping site, and it has no business becoming a dedicated place to store a shopping list that probably has nothing to do with Google's online marketplace. Since Google Express is an online shopping site (and, again, has no business having a note-taking app grafted onto it), the move from Keep to Google Express means the Assistant's shopping list functionality loses the following features: Being able to reorder items with drag and drop.
Reminders; Adding images to the shopping list; Adding voice recordings to the shopping list; Real time collaboration with other users (Express has sharing, but you can't see other people as they type—you have to refresh.); Android Wear integration; Desktop keyboard shortcuts; Checkbox management: deleting all checked items, unchecking all items, hiding checkboxes. Alternatively, the move from Keep to Google Express means the Assistant shopping list gains the following features: Google Express advertising next to every list item; Google Express advertising at the bottom of the page.

Submission + - The Kodi development team wants to be legitimate and bring DRM to the platform. (torrentfreak.com)

pecosdave writes: The XBMC/ Kodi development team has taken a lot of heat over the years, mostly due to third party developers introducing piracy plugins to the platform, then in many cases cheap Android computers are often sold with these plugins pre-installed with the Kodi or XBMC name attached to them. The Kodi team is not happy about this, and has taken the fight to the sellers. The Kodi team is now trying to work with rights holders to introduce DRM and legitimate plugins to the platform. Is this the first step towards creating a true one-stop do it yourself Linux entertainment system?

Submission + - How Google Book Search Got Lost (backchannel.com)

mirandakatz writes: When Google started its Book Search project nearly 15 years ago, it seemed impossibly ambitious: An upstart tech company that had just tamed and organized the vast informational jungle of the web would now extend the reach of its search box into the offline world. It was the company's first real moonshot, aspiring to make all the world's books digitally accessible—and in doing so, somehow produce a phase-shift in human awareness. But between legal battles and a slowly dwindling sense of ambition, Google Books never achieved those great heights, and today, it's settled into a quiet middle age of sourcing quotes and serving up snippets of text from the 25 million-plus tomes in its database. At Backchannel, Scott Rosenberg chronicles the project's rise and fall, writing that "Google employees maintain this is all they ever intended to achieve. Maybe so. But they sure got everyone else’s hopes up."

Comment Re:So, what you're saying... (Score 1) 238

Generally it is due to women valuing their life more than men. A woman gets to about thirty and wonders why she is spending so much time in the office. Men are more competitive and will work much longer hours and strive to progress while the women think "fuck that" and settle for easier life with more happy time.

Comment Re:Common Sense calling - Women have babies (Score 4, Insightful) 238

If you look at it objectively the men are unfairly discriminated against as it would totally destroy a man's career if he took as much time off. I can speak from some experience as I was a male single parent but I went into teaching at that point as it was the only way to remain working and get the support I needed. If I had stayed in the private sector I would quite simply have been sacked.

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