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Comment Re:Practical? (Score 1) 103

I want crypto that has a good chance of outlasting the heat death of the universe

Why, are you Doctor Who and got the key to unraveling space and time or something? And even if someone should bother, do you really care if crypto-archaeologists find your tin foil hat conspiracies or pr0n collection (I was considering saying love letters and gf sex video, but it's /.) many thousand years from now when you and everyone who ever knew you is countless generations dead? I do care about 20 or 50 years from now but unless we make significant progress towards immortality in that time, I hardly care what happens after I become worm food.

Comment Re:The magic is dead. (Score 2) 132

Computing is pretty much ubiquitous nowadays. When I first got into computing back in grade school around 1981-82, computers were just this incredibly awesome thing.

And no matter how fast technology goes there's a diminishing return, like the difference between CGA, EGA and VGA is never coming back no matter how much people talk about 4K, 10 bit, HDR, Rec. 2020 and so on. Doubling from 1MB to 2MB meant more than 1GB to 2GB. The last time I was genuinely floored by new hardware was in 2002 with Morrowind when I installed a new GPU with hardware T&L. Suddenly the grass looked like grass, the sea looked like sea, things started to have realistic textures and shadows and whatnot. Sure in sum we've come far since then, but never in huge leaps like that. That and modem -> DSL was also huge, but of course not as huge as getting Internet in the first place.

Comment Re:If you have "travel mode" on (Score 1) 124

Because Travel Mode is an indicator that you've got something to hide, and thus, must be using social media to send encoded terrorist messages.

Maybe, but most likely they'll just see you as another nuisance maker trying to make their job difficult. And in their opinion it's important, valuable, patriotic and you're either non-American or one of the wusses they defend. I'm sure the TSA system has some informal way to shitlist a person so he'll get picked for extra security screenings, luggage checks, extended questioning, "problems" processing forms etc. so any kind of solution that lets the TSA know you're trying to obstruct or evade them is kinda a non-starter.

Sometimes I think terrorists are just nature's way of weeding out the violent and stupid- especially suicide bombers.

I think we'd run of places to blow up before we'd run out of violent and stupid people. Also, most of them manage a pretty solid kill:death ratio so if 50 people of average intelligence dies and one nutjob the average doesn't move much at all.

Comment Re:I want to see the results first (Score 1) 303

I worked once on a very large project that tried to do something similar for the Dutch tax service: put the (ever changing) tax regulations in some form of specification language, and compile that to C# code. I was a contractor for some time on that project. After a 160 milion EUR budget overflow and some questions about it in the parliament the project was significantly reduced in its ambitions.

Oddly enough this is one of those cases that should have worked. I mean if I have a tax filling all the rules and requirements should be specified and I should be able to follow the tax calculation step by step, there shouldn't be any unspoken or ambigious requirements about what applies and in what order to evaluate it. There is only supposed to be one correct answer. What it probably means is that the tax code is so complex nobody actually understands it and that whatever the actual code does is the de facto tax system, regardless of whether it matches the specifications.

Comment Re:FINALLY! (Score 1) 269

Well that's a post-hoc justification, if AMD can't compete in a market they can:

a) Make a comeback
b) Exit that market
c) Fail as a company

If it's a market full of competition b) and c) aren't a big deal but if it's the last competitor and it'll become a monopoly it's a pretty big deal. You can still 'vote with your wallet.' but in a one-party state it's not worth much. A boxer on the ropes doesn't need a knock-out punch to know he's in trouble. It's obvious to everyone, including themselves. And AMD has been diversifying into other markets and dancing on the ropes for quite some time now. Consider these two scenarios:

AMD Intel
(Bulldozer) (Sandy Bridge)
*buy Intel, AMD exits high end market*
(no offer) (Ivy Bridge - near monopoly rent, little innovation)
*buy Intel, no real choice*
(no offer) (Broadwell - near monopoly rent, little innovation)
*buy Intel, no real choice*
(no offer) (Haswell - near monopoly rent, little innovation)
*buy Intel, no real choice*
(no offer) (Skylake - - near monopoly rent, little innovation)
*buy Intel, no real choice*
(no offer) (Kaby Lake - near monopoly rent, little innovation)
*buy Intel, no real choice*

AMD Intel
(Bulldozer) (Sandy Bridge)
*prop up AMD by buying inferior offer*
(poor offering) (better offering)
*prop up AMD by buying inferior offer*
(poor offering) (better offering)
*prop up AMD by buying inferior offer*
(poor offering) (better offering)
*prop up AMD by buying inferior offer*
(poor offering) (better offering)
*prop up AMD by buying inferior offer*
(poor offering) (better offering)
*prop up AMD by buying inferior offer*

Would we be better off in the long run? I'd argue that quite possibly both AMD and Intel customers would be better off in the long run by occasionally taking one for the team, even if AMD customers got the short end of the stick every time. Except we're not a team, so we all do what's best for us individually and lose as a team of consumers. This is not the Intel/Pentium IV situation, when you kick the big incumbent to innovate that's entirely different. Like you, I'm cautiously optimistic that this is AMD's Hail Mary save in the last moment. But it was far from given than this would be the outcome.

Comment So essentially test rides with passengers (Score 4, Interesting) 116

All trips will include two Uber engineers in the front seats as safety drivers

Google has also done this several times as a PR stunt without the taxi fare, they let a legally blind man ride with them back in 2012. I would imagine the fare is pretty irrelevant anyway when you have an expensive test vehicle and two engineers to pay. So what's really new here that hasn't already been done 5 years ago? Is there any reason to believe that in 5 years it'll be any different? I understand it's difficult, but I'm getting tired of the hype that self-driving cars are right around the corner. Two safety drivers on every ride isn't exactly self-driving. Any bets on when you can actually get into the back of a self-driving car with no helpers, no license and have the car drive? I'm starting to guess 2030+ while like totally being just "a few years out" all the way...

Comment Re:Next headline (Score 1) 128

Next headline: College Student Arrested For Building Autonomous Car That Hit Something

And the next line: Insurance company refuses to cover damages, clean-up costs, hospital bills, loss of income due to disability and so on. Even if you do eventually win expect to spend a few years in court with a lawyer driving you into bankruptcy first. Also if you're arrested you have the right to a lawyer, not so much in civil court when the insurance company claims you broke the terms, I'm sure they have something in the wall of legalese that will apply.

Comment Re:Only a penny a page, duplex? (Score 1) 5

I'll be better able to figure it when the cartridge is empty. The savings come from not having to pay eight or ten bucks for copies that I'm proofreading.

They're already online as free e-books, HTML, and PDF, with printed copies available at a price.

Comment Cataracts and Suse (Score 1) 6

IIRC you're Canadian (if in the US you'll need insurance) and should be able to get CrystaLens implants for an extra $2,000. They cure nearsightedness, farsightedness, astigmatism, and cataracts.

I ran Suse back in 2003 and liked it, but moved to Mandrake because my TV didn;t like it; I was using the TV as a monitor with an S-video cable. Still trying to find a distro that will run on an old Gateway laptop.

Comment Re:The usual 2 Windows10 questions: (Score 1) 74

Not true. It's like $8 a month and even individuals can use it starting with Windows 10. I am not defending. Just stating MS is making enterprise more readily available

The price sounds right (but not cheap if you consider that if you stay 10 years with Win7 you'll pay like $10-20/year) but where can one actually buy a single license? They say it's per user but not in any place Microsoft makes easy to find at least. Also you have to hook yourself up to the Azure cloud to use the CSP version, if you don't want to be tethered to Microsoft you need the VL version. Also it's the E3 version which basically means you get an 8 month slack on your leash using CBB (current branch for business) but not the LTSB version, that's volume licenses only.

Microsoft means business with the "last version of Windows", you can get a few months reprieve if you pay well but nobody's getting off the upgrade train this time around. The next time they pull a Vista or Win8 or whatever, you'll be dragged kicking and screaming. I hope that vGPU stuff that was on the front page recently works out, then Windows will become my Wintendo VM and they can do whatever they want as long as Steam works.

Comment Re:Nail on the head (Score 1) 145

Its very easy to talk about money not mattering and wanting an interesting life when you don't have to worry about rent or bills. Part of being an adult is accepting responsibility for your own fate and - unless you want to live in a hut in the woods or a park bench - than means finding the money to pay the above. The "gig" economy is just (usually rich) hipster talk for dead end park time McJobs thats been repackaged and remarketed for the latest gullible generation of 20 somethings who haven't yet wised up.

I think it comes in both flavors, those who use the gig economy to pick work and those who get used by the gig economy. Probably a lot more of the latter but I've met a few people who were avid surfers, kiters, snowboarders, golfers and such who want to be able to look out the window and say nope, not going to work today. Maybe we don't notice it much doing development where they care more about the results than when you do it but in a lot of other places like retail, manufacturing, education, healthcare etc. you have to be there from your shift starts until your shift ends, flexibility is low and tardiness is a big thing. Also there's people that go half a year to Thailand and work as hotel guide, dive instructor and bartender so they can afford to stay that long.

I had a colleague that was like super-fan of snowboarding, he had even more talented buddies who got sponsored enough they could stay the season in the Alps to practice, show off and do competitions, I doubt they made any real money. But that would for him be like a dream, half a year where he'd get paid to snowboard. Another friend of mine got a job where he's travelling a lot, lots of conferences and such. A lot of people wouldn't want that, but for him it was an opportunity to get a paid trip to a new golf course. I've heard the same about half-decent poker pros, some use it as a paid means to go different places and see the world while playing in poker tournaments. So for a few poster children I'm sure this is what they actually want, at least for the short term they have totally different priorities and do ad hoc work because they genuinely want ad hoc work.

Comment Re: Great idea... But there is a problem... (Score 1) 303

If we go with your plan, NASA will have to launch multiple rockets to build the Mars vehicle and many more rockets to fuel the vehicle. Have you ever thought why no NASA missions to outer space has been refueld? The ISS station gets refueled all the time but not probes. Why is that?

Because they're... probes? Most of them weigh so little and go by so energy efficient orbits that there's no point. Your typical probe is maybe a ton, the Curiosity mission was a real heavyweight at almost four tons total - of which the rover itself was around one, but still something a regular Falcon 9, Atlas V or Delta IV could deliver to Mars. There's still room for bigger missions on a Delta IV Heavy, even before the Falcon Heavy flies. We don't do it because there's no point in adding that complexity and the extra expense doesn't give any payback in science. It's better science to send two small probes than one big one.

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