Follow Slashdot blog updates by subscribing to our blog RSS feed

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Check out the new SourceForge HTML5 internet speed test! No Flash necessary and runs on all devices. ×

Comment Re:It's about landmass (Score 1) 173

If you regularly need to travel 2-3 hours away from home, the time loss from long mid-trip recharges is not small.

True. But unless it's their day job, how many regularly spend that much time in a car anyway? If you're working eight hours a day - low for the US, I hear - and sleep eight hours you've go no life left with that commute. On the weekend I suppose if you have close relatives or a cabin that's just in the sweet spot it could be a regular thing, but if it's two-three hours one way and you're staying can get destination charging. Or not if it's a remote cabin, but then EVs aren't for you. Don't get me wrong, I've driven much longer but those were hardly trips I'd make every week or every month. If you divide number of cars by number of miles driven it seems to me a lot of cars don't actually go very far.

Comment Re:Or just go back to the way things were before (Score 1) 5

This is personal to me. A friend I knew in high school, went into the service with, and kept in touch with couldn't afford insurance and caught appendicitis. It ruined his credit and nearly his family. In 1992 when he had a heart attack, he just laid down and died rather than calling 911.

That's what happens in the US when you work full time and can't afford insurance.

Comment Re:One can hope (Score 1) 117

I like Red Hat and I appreciate all they've done for open-source in the enterprise, but the desktopification of core Linux aspects is a bad thing.

Uh you realize Red Hat only has one little side project for workstations and it's essentially the server version with a GUI and a cheaper license? Fedora is just their testbed, they don't care about the desktop. For me it's pretty clear that the core feature of systemd is resource management for containers and other forms of light virtualization. If you run a dedicated server, you don't need it. If you use a hypervisor and full VMs you don't need it. If you want to "app-ify" your servers with Docker then systemd is the management tool around it. It's a huge selling point to cloud providers which is core business for Red Hat. They're not doing it to compete with Linux Mint...

Comment Re: He cheated OTHER players (Score 3, Insightful) 371

The players cheated.

They did not mark any cards, they noticed a flaw that could be used as a mark. No rule of the casino was broken, they're nullifying it because state law says the presence of marked cards means the game is not lawfully played and thus void regardless of whose fault that is. But this means that all games played with this deck should be declared void, every win and every loss. Otherwise you're saying the casino can write the values on the back of the card, they win it was a fair game but you win and they call foul. So I'm actually with Ivey on this one, he's played with the same deck under the same rules as other players but they're cancelling just his games because he won. That's not a legally sound reasoning.

Comment Re:Internet access in Cuba (Score 2) 67

The cost of access has dropped to $1.50/hour, but that's a lot of money in a country where the average monthly income is $25.

Then maybe it's a good idea to do something about the latter instead of the former... I've paid more than that back in the dial-up days and that wasn't on an island that doesn't have any cheap ways to connect to the rest of the world.

Comment Re:Busses, Street Sweepers and Garbage Trucks (Score 1) 79

They drive the same route day after day, they don't need to go fast, they are either owned by the city or by companies that have major relationships with the city so they can avoid major regulatory hurdles. These are the obvious first adopters of driverless technology.

No, but buses are big and most needed during rush hour. The moment something doesn't work you're likely to inconvenience a lot of people on the bus and on the same road. Garbage trucks are better, but usually noisy so people want collection in daytime with other traffic and you'd need a lot of technology to automate emptying the containers to really automate it. I think sweeper cars would be perfect, nobody would care if they drive at 10 mph with the yellow warning lights say 01-04 AM, if they get stuck or have a breakdown you have time to send a mop-up crew to collect them before the morning rush.

Comment Re:That's not how it works... (Score 1) 213

That's a broken financial model. The intersection of people with the capabilities, ideas, enthusiasm, and available time is extremely small. Actually, the highly skilled people are least likely to be available because they are most likely to be working already. My apparently crazy idea is that we need better financial models first. My favorite pipe dream is a kind of a crowd-funding model around clear project proposals.

No, ideas are a dime a dozen. That's the delusion most of these proposals have, that if only they got to share their great proposal with the world lots of people would come help pay for it and lots of developers would come do it for little or nothing. Your proposal sounds extremely similar to other crowdfunding / bounty / donation proposals that have been done, but most of them amount to "Now I've made a tip jar and put in the first $5, why is nothing happening?"

If you're real lucky you find a project where you put in a feature request and somebody says that's a great idea, I'll do it. If you're hiring at full commercial cost, there's tons of contractors willing to do it. Between there you might find people willing to work on it for everything from beer money to paying the bills, but then they mostly work on what they want, not what you want because they're contributing most of the value. The good thing is that they're usually in control of the scope and complexity of the tasks they agree to, so you usually get what you pay for. Still due to whiny brats it's best to put up a tip jar with no guarantees.

If you're looking for someone to create something that doesn't exist and thus probably is nobody's itch, you probably have to get close to commercial funding. Maybe some will do it for somewhat less since it's non-profit and for open source, but not beer money cheap. That means you have to get lots of people on board, which means mediating between all their pet ideas. And when push comes to shove you have to actually have to both get the funding and find someone willing to do it.

What you describe is the perfect waterfall spec, everything is described up front down to the smallest detail. Everyone who's worked with it in the real world knows it's a giant pain in the ass to create, which is why they go agile. Most likely it will have flaws and then the fun starts dealing with your co-sponsors and developer complaining about any inaccuracy in the spec, delay in delivery and what actually constitutes fulfillment. And you don't have any budget or power to approve change orders. Worst case you have a lawyer on your ass because the developer is fed up and wants to get paid.

...at which point 99.99% of the people with ideas will have said "shit I didn't want all this crap, I just had this great idea.... you fix it" and disappear in a puff of righteous indignation that the world didn't just take their great idea and ran with it. I mean that was the hard part right, like coming up with the script for a movie. Once you have that, actors, directors, producers and camera men will come running... or maybe not. I think you can build any platform you want for script writers and movie producers to meet each other, but it won't change the fundamentals. Same with idea people and open source developers.

Comment Re:Coast Starlight (Score 1) 391

Because Amtrak is a corporate welfare basket case that will never come close to justifying itself economically. We have aircraft now. Passenger rail is for short-distance commuting, and it's barely cost effective at that.

Aircraft can't bring you city center to city center. If you add up travel to and from the airport the break-even is usually 3-3.5 hours. The question is whether there's many enough passengers to justify it, laying down rail costs almost the same no matter how many travel. Airplanes are much closer tied to number of flights = cost of delivering service.

Comment Re:Well Trump has one thing right (Score 2) 523

The language you use to describe the problem is hurting your ability to solve the problem. You could as much call it crony socialism and be describing exactly the same thing, but the solutions that would get proposed would look somewhat different (and would invariably fail to eliminate the crony component, which is the actual loathsome bit.)

Well crony just means "a close friend especially of long standing" so basically you could use that to describe all forms of "I'll scratch your back if you'll scratch mine" relationships. If people with an Ivy League degree only hire people with other Ivy League degrees it's a form of cronyism. Crony socialism would be "some animals are more equal than others". However "crony capitalism" as a combined term has been refined past "cronyism in capitalism" like an old boys club of rich white men sitting on each other's boards to a rather specific term for capitalists who influence and manipulate the political system to create unfair business conditions towards their customers, competitors and employees.

Basically it's a 21st century word for the collusion between business and government, without the authoritarian government of fascism. You do as our lobby group wants, we make lots of money and give you a fat campaign contribution and you get to blast the public with PR campaigns and be/stay in office. Win-win for both of them. I don't think you can do away with the intersection between business and government, for example I don't expect the Greens and the shale oil industry to agree any day soon. The question is more what are legitimate and illegitimate ways for them to interact. A trade association is legal. A cartel is not. What makes one different from the other? The exact nature of the interaction.

Comment Re:No Gut no Glory (Score 1) 66

A previous launch failure was due to a third-party strut failing under load -- again SpaceX cut corners by not testing each and every component, accepting the risk of a failure rather than spending time and money on eliminating a one in a million possibility.

They had a contract with a third party to supply parts built to certain specifications, they were supposed to do the testing. I really doubt they had any acceptable failure rate in that contract, like you might have with consumer toys. SpaceX had to backtrack and say "if you want it done right, do it yourself" but it's really contrary to what they want because that's the way you end up with massive vertically integrated behemoths and NASA-certified screwdrivers that costs 100x what a normal screwdriver costs.

Comment Re:Permission? (Score 1) 60

From whom does one ask permission to go to the moon? And who authorises that authority to grant it? And what would be the punishment if one went to the moon without permission?

If you can drag the whole launch platform into international waters, nobody I think. It's not the going to the moon that's regulated, it's launching to get there. The outer space treaty says that nobody lays claim to own the moon, so there's no such thing as trespass. I'd think most other things would follow the "flag rules", if you're on a US ship in international waters US laws apply aboard the ship. What would happen if you went there, declared the treaty invalid and your independence as a free nation is anyone's guess. Most likely they'd just ignore you and if you tried to attack any "invaders" they'd kill you in self defense.

Comment Re:Increase gaming preformance by going back to Wi (Score 1) 129

Vista flopped because the PC manufacturers didn't believe Microsoft on the release date so they dragged their asses in the development of Windows drivers for the new driver model. Then when Vista was released, manufacturers were caught with their pants down. People upgrading to Vista ended up with blue-screens or just couldn't get their hardware to work. Of course, everyone blamed Microsoft.

Well it didn't help that Vista ran like a dog on low end machines. WinXP required 64MB RAM, Vista upped that to 1GB - that's 16x as high in a little over five years - and even that was terrible. I helped a friend who bought a mahcine like that with Vista pre-installed, it was simply painful. I helped him install XP and that worked so much better, since we weren't bumping into the 4GB limit anyway there was no major downsides. While they didn't officially lower the requirement again for Win7, it's generally recognized that Microsoft put Vista on a diet. Three years later not only was more memory common, it actually ran far better on far less.

Other annoying features was an overly aggressive Superfetch, causing disk churn and annoying lacks in responsiveness. And while UAC might be a good thing, it was very noisy to begin with and lots of software triggered UAC prompts more often than they should or even when they didn't need to. For users that already trusted the software they ran under XP it was easy to see the annoyance and hard to see the immediate benefit. It was a whole host of issues that made Vista a giant flop.

Comment Re:Hey, cable companies: (Score 1) 194

Here is how to do it: When trenching the streets, install a wide (12" or more) PUBLICLY OWNED conduit pipe. Then allow any bonded provider to run cable or fiber through that pipe for a small standard fee. Since 99% of the cost of providing service is the trenching, this will make the market far more competitive.

Why bother? Copper and coax are quite clearly inferior solutions for new deployment and laying down a 12" pipe would be a huge cost, just lay down a fiber to the nearest central and let companies compete for what boxes they want to put on the ends. Put out a bid with a reasonable residential SLA for line maintenance, make sure the penalties are sufficient for good service.

Slashdot Top Deals

You can not win the game, and you are not allowed to stop playing. -- The Third Law Of Thermodynamics

Working...