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Comment Re:No return trips? (Score 1) 469

So 200+ ships at billions of dollars each? Yeah, that's gonna happen.

The US spent more than that dropping bombs on the Middle East, not benefit was achieved by the effort, and almost nobody wanted it.

Imagine if all the people on Earth actually wanted something and we could effectively solve the coordination problem (coming soon to a blockchain near you)

Comment Re:Only when it costs them money. (Score 1) 113

There are a few options but all of them require high-jacking IoT devices.

If I were feeling more energetic I'd pull out some comments from here I left a decade ago talking about a guild of Internet engineers and a trust system where certified operators could send cryptographically-signed messages upstream to shut off attacking ports (or requests to do so - that's a local detail).

Yes, we're decentralized, and that's good, but we also need to cooperate.

When homeowners get their Internet shut off because their IoT is attacking and they have to call a local tech to diagnose the problem and pull out the offending light bulb before it's turned back on, suddenly everybody will demand secure light bulbs (except us 'luddites' who are still using dumb dishwashers because we know that complexity breaks).

Comment Re:Consumers (Score 1) 301

Try bandcamp.

Here, I'll start you off with some premium grade-A smokey music. Nope, that's not marijuana (though if that's your thing, it should still work out for you). Inhale again and you'll realize it's mesquite. I suppose the two are similar, because smelling this music gives me the munchies, except I don't wanna settle for anything less than slow-fuckin'-cooked brisket.

Comment Re:There *was* a proposal simpler than IPv6.. IPxl (Score 1) 125

What hardware concerns does IPv6 actually address? Far as I can tell it was created without too much concern for hardware. 128 bits for example. Most cpu's are going to have to use multiple cpu cycles. Due to registers being 32/64 bit (not including simd extensions.) These aren't really a concern considering how fast our computers are and that networking gear has special processors.

IPv6 fails in a few areas that some people refuse to even acknowledge. If they wanted IPv6 to be successful they would have kept it simple. For example getting rid of broadcast in favor or multicast. Another is the complete waste of addresses, each of my interfaces gets multiple /64 and then assigns the rest of the 64bit (randomly or from the mac address) if we were going to waste that many address we should have just stuck with 64bit.

64 bit addresses would have hit all the boxes of needs that ipv6 provides. BGP routes not taking up so much memory and being simpler globally. Every device being able to reasonably have it's own globally unique address.(Not every device needs a unique address) 128 bits is stupidly large, 33 bits for example is double the size of 32 bits. For each bit we are doubling.

IPv6 fails because they didn't think to make it simple. Embedded devices need to be simple, not every manufacturer is going to pay for the best programmers. I've dealt with too many "modems/routers" that barely understood ipv4 let alone ipv6.

IPxl if implemented could work. I see it as the same hack that UTF8 uses. It faces the same exact problem the IPv6 faces, Software/hardware would have to be upgraded. IPxl could then take the good stuff such as prefix delegation. (We are keeping dhcp and arp)

Comment Re:With all due respect to Mr. Hawking and us... (Score 1) 280

This is known already. Because, you know, physics.

Physics ain't done, son. Lots of stuff is deemed impossible before the next theoretical breakthrough.

When we have a fully-working model of the universe, then we can declare it impossible. Until then, avoid being too certain. The history is science is littered with fools who made certain declarations based on current, incomplete theory.

Based on what we know to date, FTL travel appears to be impossible.

Comment Re:"they'd be back if it happened again" (Score 1) 240

"The police told me they'd be back if it happened again." For what crime? Is it normal for police in Canada to threaten to invade an innocent couple's home for doing something legal?

Tor is a thorn in the side of despotic regimes. They will harass anybody who runs an exit node. Best case, they break down a door and find some pot in an ash tray, then lock this couple up for a few years. It's good for the police union, good for the prison industry, and good for the black ops programs funding their budget with drug smuggling.

Win-win-win (unless you're a subject of the regime).

Comment Re:Stupid (Score 1) 51

Name one country that doesn't mind its military bases being photographed every couple of months and being published for anyone to look at.

If Google is photographing your bases and publishing it, the problem isn't that they published it. The problem is that Google was able to successfully photograph it.

If Google can photograph your base, then your adversary can too. And Google is almost certainly doing things in the nicest way possible, obeying laws, not generally willing to put up with planes being shot down as merely an inevitable cost of business, etc. A real adversary doesn't have those constraints.

Attempting to censor Google is symptom-treating, and really, it's to a comical degree. It's way out there; this isn't merely "slightly stupid." This totally reeks of closing barns doors after horses have gotten out... except that there will be an update in a few months and of course they'll want that blurred too,because they still haven't closed the barn door. It's more like they just don't want people talking about the barn door, that they have already decided they're never going to close.

YOUR HORSES ARE OUT, NUMBNUTS!!! WE ARE LOOKING AT YOUR BARN DOOR BECAUSE IT'S HYSTERICALLY FUNNY THAT YOU KEEP LEAVING IT OPEN, not because we want to steal your horses, which aren't in the barn anyway. If the horses were really still in the barn, then you would have shot down the photographer.

Comment Re:Totally. (Score 1) 122

his country is full of extremely stupid, gullible, and ridiculously-overarmed people, and a small subset of whom probably thinks it would be a good thing to bring harm to the First Lady.

Meanwhile, Jefferson often complained about the never-ending parade of people who walked into his office at all hours of the day to complain.

But he didn't have a Department of Education. Or bombing campaigns in sixteen countries (the Barbary Pirates not withstanding).

Comment Re:With all due respect to Mr. Hawking and us... (Score 1) 280

There's no possibility that aliens capable of FTL would find us remotely interesting. Once you get to that technology, energy and resource problems either have been solved, or become very easily solvable.

And if they care at all about things like us, they already have had probes in our system for eons, by all averages. It would be absurd to think they can't build self-replicating probes at our level of technology plus a few hundred years as a minimum. Once you have that, if you care about the galaxy, you map it.

There's nothing we can tell them that they don't already know. They haven't destroyed us, so they won't.

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