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Comment Re:Zero Risk (Score 1) 229

Let's do something nice on Slashdot for a change: a Colorado breweries love-in!

I'll start: GREAT DIVIDE. Probably my favorite from that state, right now. (Maybe because it's not distributed in my state, so I treasure it like I treasure other hard-to-gets.)

Avery and Oskar Blues are other near-favorites. Steamwork (though I'm not sure they package). Ska can be good.

What's yours? I wanna go on another CO shopping trip in a few weeks. Help me out.

Comment Maybe not so far off after all. (Score 1) 66

I know latency is an issue, but surely we can use compression to some degree. 4:1 10:1? Run length encoding comes to mind. Maybe give up some theoretical resolution with a compression type that isn't designed to be 100:1 but nearly instantaneous in encoding and decoding (again, something like RLE).

Note, the same goes for transmitting to your TV from your phone, focusing more on ease of encoding (to save phone battery life).

Comment Cui Bono? (Score 1, Insightful) 149

There's lots of senseless finger-pointing going around. Anonymous doesn't get anything by shutting down Netflix (Americans aren't going to pressure the State Dept. over it to restore Julian's internet). So, who benefits by shutting down Twitter while Wikileaks is rolling out anti-Clinton hits and the Twitterverse is trying to work out what the leaks mean? North Korea? Only if they're doing it for the lulz. Or promises of favorable treatment under a Clinton administration.

Comment Re:in other news (Score 2, Insightful) 81

And I don't have to buy them from Tesla â" there are plenty of other sellers out there.

Yeah, but if you have a Tesla roof, Powerwall, and Model 3, then it'll handle the credits for you among the reverse net metering, the panel, and your charge-ups at the SuperChargers.

If you put ten Teslets in at home yesterday, you can take ten Teslets out at the SuperCharger today.

Solar City, on its own, had to make up all of the finance costs from net-metering only. As part of Tesla, they can give you flexibility on how to handle the charges. If you consume way more than your production in your cars, and go past the finance costs for your roof, then they can charge that difference to your credit card. But before that, it's much more economically efficient to keep all the charges in-system.

If you have a non-integrated stack then you can do all the same things, but it's necessarily going to cost more because of transaction costs.

Comment Re:That's, for better or worse, for a court to dec (Score 1) 218

Without copyright law, someone else could grab my novel and start printing/selling their own copies of it.

You should look into Creator Endorsed.

Only asshole people will buy from a rip-off publisher. But asshole people will also elect a government that will enact things like a DMCA, so they're going to screw society either way as long as they have the government stick to wield. Not having the government-enforced copyright also eliminates problems like this Samsung* one, so you get multiple benefits from that strategy. It's risk-management, not risk-avoidance.

* guess whose phones I won't be buying again in the future?

Comment Re:Let's see what it really costs and what you get (Score 1) 21

I see $25-40 as a tough sell.

Yeah, I was paying that for all the channels I could watch on Dish Network, and I killed it because I didn't need yet another bill when the Internet has so much free and interesting content. And that was five years ago - why can't Google undercut that by half since they don't have to maintain a fleet of satellites and special hardware?

TV is for people who like the TV format now. There are just many other options than there were in the past and many people have rejected the TV programming model as uninteresting, given [better] options. But TV people will pay a lot of money for their preferred entertainment.

Comment Re: Uneducated voters, yay! (Score 2, Interesting) 412

There's a great study out showing that educated voters tend to prefer Hillary (and then Stein and Johnson on the upper end as levels max out).

The funny thing about the study though is that a plumber running his own business with a dozen employees is "uneducated" while a Ph.D. in Gender Studies working the counter at Panera is "educated".

YMMV, read the fine print .

Comment Re:huh? (Score 1) 146

A decade or two ago (I'm not really sure when he wrote it)) Brad Templeton suggested something like this as a fix for various problems, especially trademark. My take is that the basic idea is that TLDs are already meaningless, so diversifying them into increased meaninglessness does no damage while offering some benefits. (e.g. makes monopolizing certain words harder, makes it easier to try out new registration policies, etc)

Comment Re:Does anybody ... (Score 1) 475

how do you cut off *his* internet connection without cutting off the entire Ecuadorian Embassy's internet connection?

Go to the rack and unplug the ethernet cable whose other end is in Assange's room. Change the wifi password and only tell people the new one along with the instructions "don't share your password, especially with that Assange guy."

The "state actor" was Ecuador, or else it didn't happen. That's the only government capable of doing it.

Comment Re:Logical (Score 1) 365

Who is responsable in the case your AI-autonomous car decides to kill some pedestrians ?

I don't know. Tell me more about what happened right before that.

Was the pedestrian running out into traffic for laughs, to see all the cars crash into each other as some other threads here suggest? Was the occupant aiming it toward crowds to impress his friend with how it suddenly swerves away from the crowd when he takes his hands off the wheel? Did it just suddenly "randomly" turn off the street into a crowd as a result of a bug?

By the time someone or something decides "hit this or hit that" you already have a huge failure. That is way more important and common than the hit-this-or-that question itself.

Comment Re:Logical (Score 1) 365

If you're worried to the point of stupidity/paralysis ("be prepared to be sued out of existence") then you've already chosen to never drive even a manually-operated car, because you were overwhelmed by your fears. Most people don't have that attitude going on, so they already drive cars anyway, where they face constant daily risk of injuring or even killing pedestrians.

And some of them end up occasionally doing it, to many peoples' grief. For whatever reason, society didn't give up and decide the existence of cars was just too dangerous to allow. It's over a hundred years too late for to advocate against cars. By the time your grandparents were born, this argument (that we're having today) had already been settled.

How the vehicle got to be out of control is what everyone trying to establish liability will be asking. That it killed a pedestrian or driver is merely the motivation for asking.

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