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Comment Cui Bono? (Score 1, Insightful) 116

There's lots of senseless finger-pointing going around. Anonymous doesn't get anything by shutting down Netflix (Americans aren't going to pressure the State Dept. over it to restore Julian's internet). So, who benefits by shutting down Twitter while Wikileaks is rolling out anti-Clinton hits and the Twitterverse is trying to work out what the leaks mean? North Korea? Only if they're doing it for the lulz. Or promises of favorable treatment under a Clinton administration.

Comment Re:in other news (Score 2, Insightful) 73

And I don't have to buy them from Tesla â" there are plenty of other sellers out there.

Yeah, but if you have a Tesla roof, Powerwall, and Model 3, then it'll handle the credits for you among the reverse net metering, the panel, and your charge-ups at the SuperChargers.

If you put ten Teslets in at home yesterday, you can take ten Teslets out at the SuperCharger today.

Solar City, on its own, had to make up all of the finance costs from net-metering only. As part of Tesla, they can give you flexibility on how to handle the charges. If you consume way more than your production in your cars, and go past the finance costs for your roof, then they can charge that difference to your credit card. But before that, it's much more economically efficient to keep all the charges in-system.

If you have a non-integrated stack then you can do all the same things, but it's necessarily going to cost more because of transaction costs.

Comment Re:If the point was ... (Score 4, Insightful) 300

There's no proof that it has anything to do with Wikileaks, but in a world of IoT devices with no thought toward security, anyone who cares to do so can mount DDOS with the power of a national entity.

What's the point of doing what Assange and Wikileaks have been doing without any moral position? He isn't helping his own case.

Comment Re:Legal? (Score 2) 230

No, of course it is not legal to set a trap to intentionally hurt someone, even if you expect that the trap could only be activated by the person committing property theft or vandalism. Otherwise, you'd see shotguns built into burglar alarms.

Fire alarm stations sometimes shoot a blue dye which is difficult to remove or one which only shows under UV. Never stand in front of one when pulling the lever! But they are not supposed to hurt you.

And of course these booby traps generally are not as reliable as the so-called "inventor" thinks and tend to hurt the innocent.

Comment Re:That's, for better or worse, for a court to dec (Score 1) 215

Without copyright law, someone else could grab my novel and start printing/selling their own copies of it.

You should look into Creator Endorsed.

Only asshole people will buy from a rip-off publisher. But asshole people will also elect a government that will enact things like a DMCA, so they're going to screw society either way as long as they have the government stick to wield. Not having the government-enforced copyright also eliminates problems like this Samsung* one, so you get multiple benefits from that strategy. It's risk-management, not risk-avoidance.

* guess whose phones I won't be buying again in the future?

Comment Re:Let's see what it really costs and what you get (Score 1) 21

I see $25-40 as a tough sell.

Yeah, I was paying that for all the channels I could watch on Dish Network, and I killed it because I didn't need yet another bill when the Internet has so much free and interesting content. And that was five years ago - why can't Google undercut that by half since they don't have to maintain a fleet of satellites and special hardware?

TV is for people who like the TV format now. There are just many other options than there were in the past and many people have rejected the TV programming model as uninteresting, given [better] options. But TV people will pay a lot of money for their preferred entertainment.

Comment Re: Uneducated voters, yay! (Score 2, Interesting) 409

There's a great study out showing that educated voters tend to prefer Hillary (and then Stein and Johnson on the upper end as levels max out).

The funny thing about the study though is that a plumber running his own business with a dozen employees is "uneducated" while a Ph.D. in Gender Studies working the counter at Panera is "educated".

YMMV, read the fine print .

Comment Re:Economic malthusianism (Score 1) 886

Before using the "Cry wolf" argument, please remember that in the original fable, eventually the wolf did come.

Maybe we'll take this next round of automation in stride, we'll adapt to the technology, and the economy will adjust. Maybe the cries of "Wolf!" will be just cries, again. But maybe not. To say that the cries of "Wolf!" will NEVER be valid is actually a bigger and harder to prove conjecture than that at some point the cry will be valid..

Comment Re:This should be used with Cannabis (Score 2) 197

Or what usually happens: we grow more humans.

Nope - more efficient food production leads to more leisure time which leads to more education which leads to lower population levels. Feed everybody as much as possible if you want the population to decline.

Comment Re:So, what's Soylent really about? (Score 1) 207

Like Boost, too much simple sugar.

Water, Corn Maltodextrin, Sugar, Blend of Vegetable Oils (Canola, Corn), Milk Protein Concentrate, Soy Protein Isolate, Cocoa Powder (Processed with Alkali). Less than 0.5% of: Nonfat Milk, Magnesium Phosphate, Sodium Citrate, Soy Lecithin, Natural & Artificial Flavor, Calcium Phosphate, Potassium Chloride, Cellulose Gum, Potassium Citrate, Choline Chloride, Ascorbic Acid, Cellulose Gel, Carrageenan, Salt, Ferric Phosphate, dl-Alpha-Tocopheryl Acetate, Zinc Sulfate, Niacinamide, Manganese Sulfate, Calcium Pantothenate, Copper Sulfate, Thiamine Chloride Hydrochloride, Vitamin A Palmitate, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Riboflavin, Folic Acid, Biotin, Chromium Chloride, Sodium Molybdate, Sodium Selenate, Potassium Iodide, Vitamin B12, Phylloquinone, and Vitamin D3.

Comment Re:So, what's Soylent really about? (Score 1) 207

The closest would be Boost Plus, which still comes in short on calories and way too much simple sugar. Look at the ingredients!

Water, Corn Syrup, Sugar, Vegetable Oil (Canola, High Oleic Sunflower, Corn), Milk, Protein Concentrate, Cocoa Processed with Alkali, and Less than 1% of: Calcium Caseinate, Soy Protein Isolate, Sodium Caseinate, Gum Acacia, Fructooligosaccharides, Potassium Citrate, Inulin (from Chicory), Soy Lecithin, ...

Comment Re:So, what's Soylent really about? (Score 1) 207

First, you're not realizing what I bill those customers. I don't want to wave money around on Slashdot but I assure you, you too would drink an unoffensive bottle of Soylent for that much. The main thing it buys me is freedom, and there is no shortage of pleasure coming from that. I can work on what I want most of the time, or not work, if I just keep a few of those customers.

Second, you can't have any of the real pleasures in life without your health. You are evolved to be attracted to foods that would have been infrequent windfalls throughout most of the evolution of human beings. Now, you can have them for every meal, and your body is sending you the signals to do so despite the fact that those foods will ultimately be detrimental to you. If you are still compelled to eat them, there's a pretty good chance that's the addiction talking.

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