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Comment Re:Seriously? (Score 1) 230

"- If the federal reserve dramatically raises interest rates, the interest on the massive national debt will skyrocket. The government will meet payments by issuing more debt (how else?). This will lead to more inflation, not to the dollar "hitting the moon""

If the federal reserve dramatically raises interest rates, the interest on the existing massive national debt will not change one bit. The coupon rate on US Treasury bonds is fixed for the life of the bond and cannot be changed, not even by an act of congress.

The only thing that will change is the coupon rate on newly issued debt. The current coupon rate of newly issued short term bonds is 0.00%, and the only yield investors are realizing is that which is obtained by purchasing the bonds at a discount to face value.

Comment Re:Provide this at the state level (Score 0) 276

Here's my homework, teacher: Article 1, section 8: Congress may lay and collect taxes for the "common defense" or "general welfare" of the United States.

This does not equate to a power to spend tax money on (or regulate) anything "for the 'common defense' or 'general welfare'". If Congress's enumerated powers included getting involved in education, this clause would grant them the power to raise money toward that end. It does not grant that power by itself. If it did, the remainder of the section (and the entire concept of enumerated powers) would be rendered meaningless, which was obviously not the authors' or signers' intent.

Don't worry, this is a very common mistake. Your reading comprehension will improve with practice. In the meantime, perhaps you would care to read what Thomas Jefferson and James Madison had to say on the subject.

Comment Re:Not Fed (Score 1) 276

Financially, Congress has the power to tax, borrow, pay debt and provide for the common defense and the general welfare.

You skipped some critical words and punctuation:

The Congress shall have Power To lay and collect Taxes, Duties, Imposts and Excises, to pay the Debts and provide for the common Defence and general Welfare of the United States; ...

Notice the comma after "Excises"—these are two separate lists, not a single broad power. The power described here is simply "To lay and collect Taxes, Duties, Imposts and Excises". That's it: to collect money, not to spend it. The purpose of that power is described by the next phrase, "to pay the Debts and provide for the common Defence and general Welfare of the United States". That is merely clarifying language, tacked on to explain why the money is being collected and not intended to grant any additional powers. In other words, the nature of this power is merely to fund the enumerated powers given by the remainder of the section. If this sentence alone were intended to authorize absolutely anything which might be argued to "provide for the common Defense and general Welfare" then the remainder of the section would be superfluous. That (false) interpretation does away with the entire concept of enumerated powers. The authors and signers obviously did not intend for the enumeration of powers granted to Congress to be superfluous, or Section 8 would have ended immediately after the words "general Welfare".

Don't just take my word for it, though. Consider instead the writings of Thomas Jefferson and James Madison on the subject.

Comment Re:Windfarms Kill 1000's of Bald & Gold Eagles (Score 4, Informative) 171

Wikipedia says 4700 annually, 70 of which are eagles. It also says that it's due to the turbines being very small turbines that spin way, way faster than the modern large turbines, which spin a lot slower.
 
So your argument is
1) wrong on the numbers
2) not applicable to modern wind farms with slower spinning turbines
3) not applicable to this wind farm, which is replacing the turbines with safer ones

Comment Re:It was a joke to begin with (Score 1) 276

When the time comes to start specializing in something (i.e. choosing a major in college), they will have a good idea of what subjects they enjoy and have an aptitude for. That's where they'll pick up the math and analytical skills and other foundational stuff.

Math and analytical skills are foundational skills for far more than just computer programming, and ought to be taught long before the student enters college. It is undeniably true that not every student needs to be trained as a large-system software developer, but everyone should learn at least the most basic fundamentals of computer design, both practical and theoretical, and more importantly the problem-solving skills such as abstract thinking, divide-and-conquer, proofs, etc. which are necessary to understand how complex systems function, including—but not limited to—software. Introductory computer coding is one context in which these skills can be taught, so long as it is recognized as a means to an end and not the end itself.

Comment Well that's terrifying (Score 5, Informative) 414

For two reasons:
 
1) no valid crime (in my opinion) was committed
2) it's a two year sentence, besides pissing off a bunch of people, what purpose does this serve?
 
You can't change a person's ideologies by imprisoning them, not without brainwashing them. This seems like the wrong way to address these problems. Imprisoning and fining people for their thoughts and beliefs is likely to cause more people to think this way, rather than deter it.

Comment Re:Wearables is a fad that's petering out. (Score 1) 38

It's not unlikely that your IOT toaster will just use the RFID chip to toast your toast to "3" darkness setting. It's possible you'll use the RFID in the smartwatch, but in that case, you can just buy an RFID sticker and stick it to the back of the watch, or integrate it in to the face of the watch. Some people have injectable RFID capsules in their arms if you don't like wearing something on your wrist.

Comment Re:And we have Google (Score 1) 204

You can't have it both ways, either we have a forgetful society ... or you let things be remembered forever and applied to your "reputation".

The so-called "right to be forgotten" has exactly zero relevance here. For one, it never prevented anyone from assembling a database of social interactions with "scores" based on individual behavior. It only prohibited the details of that behavior from being searchable by the general public. This new system China is implementing does not need to be public or searchable to be effective and would be fully compatible with the nonsensical "right to be forgotten" laws instituted in the EU. Moreover, the ability to search historical records for once-public information about an individual's past does not in any way imply the degree of official monitoring and collection of private data about individuals that China's plan calls for, much less mandate that this information be used to control access to goods and services in service to the rulers' political and social agenda.

When a person with extensive debt and a history of missing payments is denied a loan based on their credit score, that is simply common sense. If more information allows that risk to be assessed more precisely, so much the better—so long as the information is made available voluntarily, and deliberately hiding relevant data to obtain credit which would not have been extended had the lender known about the risk is tantamount to fraud (i.e. theft). On the other hand, when an otherwise responsible, low-risk individual is denied a loan merely because an intrusive government deems them "potentially subversive" or "not a team player" we have a serious problem, especially when the government exercises significant direct influence over the economy.

TL;DR: The problem is not the absence of "forgetfulness" or the existence of a "reputation score", it's the influence of the government over the economy and the application of political force guided by that information. Without that information the government's meddling would be perhaps a bit less efficient, but no less wrong.

Comment Re:If you don't like what they pay, don't drive (Score 1) 306

It's not a sustainable profession though; taxi drivers traditionally were career jobs for many in past decades. My friend's wife's dad is a taxi driver (in south america) and owns his own house, has raised a family of three and lives comfortably and is near retirement.
 
Now we're on the cusp of replacing taxi drivers with robots. While there are some that lean on Uber as a full time job, it's never been sold as a full time job, and second, it's been in the news for years now that the plan is to replace all human drivers with robots. It's unreasonable to expect to make a lifetime living from a company like uber, when the company is broadly advertising that they expect to replace their contractor workforce with robots.
 
TIme and time again they try and compare themselves to industries like healthcare, education and airport workers - industries that can't be fully automated. But their industry is being actively automated. There's zero reason to give benefits to these contractors in the long term, which seems to me why they're disinterested in providing benefits and pay increases to a market that has a seemingly limitless number of college students willing to work for any price.

Comment Re:Surprise, Surprise, Surprise! (Score 1) 301

I haven't seen a software project of any complexity come in this close.

Even your average "Hello, World" app running on a modern PC is probably more complex, if you count all the software involved in getting from a few lines of trite source code to pixels on a screen: compilers, program loaders, standard libraries, system calls, filesystems, pseudo-terminals, terminal emulators, IPC, rendering libraries, graphics drivers, window managers, memory management, scheduling, etc. We've just become very good at automating the management of all that complexity behind the scenes, to the point that it's routinely taken for granted and treated almost like magic. Physical designs are trivial by comparison—but the complexity they do have is much harder to manage compared to digital constructs.

Comment Re:Waaa waaa waaa (Score 1, Insightful) 62

Umm, CNN is the reason that Millennials stayed home instead of voting for Hillary. CNN trashed Bernie throughout the entire campaign with lies and deception at the behest of the Clinton campaign. Unfortunately Millennials will believe anything they are told by "reputable" left-leaning journalism outfits like CNN.

You think I'm for Trump, and you're mistaken. Trump terrifies me, like he should terrify the legions of mouth-breathers who put him into office.

You are foolish to think that anyone who doesn't toe your particular line is necessarily against you. Your kneejerk reaction to my post, accusing me of being a Trump supporter, is ignorant, foolhardy, and outright stupid.

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