Follow Slashdot blog updates by subscribing to our blog RSS feed

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Check out the new SourceForge HTML5 internet speed test! No Flash necessary and runs on all devices. ×

Comment Re:Fucki voting your conscience (Score 1) 2837

Not all of us CAN vote in the R/D primaries. At least in my area, they are closed primaries. To participate, you must be registered as a R or D. I am not, and therefore not allowed to participate. If I were allowed to, I would have voted against either of the candidates they chose. In addition, primaries are generally not binding and the party elite could chose to run anyone they wish. That would likely cause a backlash, but it's not impossible.

I did vote in the main election. I did not vote for either R or D for President. It is my opinion that both of them would be dangerous for the nation in various ways. I also don't believe in the "wasted vote" nonsense. My votes reflected my beliefs as closely as I could make them. I suspect the only person I could vote for I 100% agree with would be myself, and perhaps not even then.

With Congress, the President, and possibly soon, SCOTUS being Republican controlled, I'm not feeling optimistic right now. I wouldn't with Democrats in the same position either. The whole point is supposed to be to provide balance, it's pretty tough to balance anything with only one side.

Comment Re:Stop voting for stupid people! (Score 1) 246

Except that smart people don't seem to run for public office, or at least, they don't get very far. There might be some exceptions, but they seem pretty rare to me. I can't think of the last time I saw a candidate for a position more influential than City Council that wasn't a blithering moron and/or completely and obviously corrupt.

Comment Re: Xray bikes (Score 1) 158

You're both right, mostly.

Race-grade carbon-fiber (not fiberglass, but same idea) bicycle frames have integrated seat masts with adjustable height mast caps. So, most of the seat tube is integral to the frame, requriring that the frame be roughly the right size for the rider. The seat cap's height is adjustable to set the last few mm's of height to exactly what the riders preference is. It's a great system, as you get all of the benefit of an integrated seat mast (added strength and reduced weight at the top tube/seat tube/seat stay junction, reduced weight because you don't need a clamping system for the seatpost, reduced weight from not having a seatpost, some vibration reduction from the extra carbon) without the steep penality of having to make an absolutely custom sized frame for each rider.

They are, generally the same bikes that you can get from a high-end bike shop. Occassionally they'll use an in-development carbon for the true pro frames to see how it holds up (Trek did this with the 110(?) OCLV frames before they brought them on the market, IIRC), but otherwise, they're the same.

Comment Re: What about the EULA for the car? (Score 1) 365

That's my thought with it as well. I have owned a Prius and currently own a Leaf which uses a similar setup. They made the shift setup different enough that you don't have muscle memory competing with you. Making the shifter look the same but work differently is stupidity of the highest level. And with the whole thing being electronic now, just make the car automatically go to park mode if the engine is off, driver door is open, or the driver is not present. Simple software update as all the required sensors are already there.

Yes, people should use the parking brake. But they don't. I even had a driving instructor get after me for using it, he said it was "unnecessary". So it's not surprising that people don't do it. The vehicle should have basic fail safe setups. Make it possible to override, but have big warnings and noise if they do. If a distracted user can easily miss that the vehicle is not in Park mode with the engine off or doors open, the UI has a serious flaw that needs fixing. We all agree drivers shouldn't be distracted, but they are. Everyone gets in a hurry or something once in a while.

While a death as a result is tragic, I don't think it rises to a fault of the manufacturer that should result in legal action. With the current courts and laws though, it probably does. And the lawyers involved will get millions, affected owners will get a coupon for a free oil change or similar.

Frankly, we wouldn't even be discussing it if it hadn't been a famous/rich person who was killed. Sad as that is.

Comment Just like crypto (Score 1) 313

These are the same people that think we can create cryptography backdoors that can't be abused. In spite of every expert in the field telling them it's impossible.

Firearms have evolved to be amazingly simple, reliable devices. If you add anything to one, even another mechanical safety, you make it more complex and, therefore, less reliable. History has proven that over and over again. They are this way because if you pull one, bodily harm is a given. Either you shoot someone, or they injure or kill you attempting to prevent being shot. In a case like that, you can not accept even a 1% increased risk of failure.

I'd love for them to be idiot proof and still serve their function. That would be an amazing thing. But I don't see any reason to believe it's any more possible than unbreakable backdoored crypto.

Do stupid people store and/or use them improperly? Yes. Just like people store and use all sorts of tools improperly. People still electrocute themselves because they are too damn lazy to go flip the breaker. It's not the tool that's broken. Tragic accidents can happen with every tool.

Comment Re:Dear FBI and US Gov (Score 1) 103

touch screen phones are difficult to secure with complex passwords

That's why one of the built-in security features is to accept password input only via the touchscreen, and only with escalating time delays after a few wrong guesses. Those are two of the features the government wanted Apple to bypass by writing a custom FBiOS.

Comment Re:Good for her (Score 1) 345

Suppose they've done the good old detective work, infiltrated and done what the national security services were expected to do and gotten this result: "The target for assassination is 89HWE79G and we will do it by planting explosives in *()H(& DJKSDF and beneath ((*BBSEUFU^. We will also target the following: SDF^KJDSDF&Gm, ##()*#&$)L#K, and *^)(()*WERWER, ( and if we have time %QAWERA)."

Well, then, the detectives and infiltrators get called into the boss' office and emerge to stand at their computers (their asses having been chewed to bits for failing the Tradecraft 101 step of planting keyloggers, hidden shoulder-surf cams, etc) to send out resumes before HR gets around to revoking their login credentials. Next stupid question?

Comment Re:This is a change for the better (Score 3, Insightful) 403

Baloney. Comey isn't being "reasoned and nuanced"; he's engaging in rhetorical bafflegab to pretend to be reasoned and nuanced. His definitions of "skepticism" and "cynicism" are, respectively, "tut-tutting and letting me go back to doing things the way I want" and "actually making my start complying with the Constitution".

Comment Re:Very sad - but let's get legislation in place N (Score 3, Informative) 706

And why should it? For the sake of argument do you think the government should tell you that you MUST install a home security system, have dead bolts on every exterior door, require exterior doors be steel or solid wood, limit the side of windows to no more than 1" by 1" or require bars?

If you're in business and promising your customers that you're keeping their stuff secure, well, yeah, there should be legal penalties for not meeting some standards of due diligence (admittedly, there's quite a bit of wiggle room as to where those standards should be set).

Slashdot Top Deals

Egotist: A person of low taste, more interested in himself than in me. -- Ambrose Bierce

Working...