Want to read Slashdot from your mobile device? Point it at m.slashdot.org and keep reading!

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Get HideMyAss! VPN, PC Mag's Top 10 VPNs of 2016 for 55% off for a Limited Time ×

Comment Re: What about the EULA for the car? (Score 1) 365

That's my thought with it as well. I have owned a Prius and currently own a Leaf which uses a similar setup. They made the shift setup different enough that you don't have muscle memory competing with you. Making the shifter look the same but work differently is stupidity of the highest level. And with the whole thing being electronic now, just make the car automatically go to park mode if the engine is off, driver door is open, or the driver is not present. Simple software update as all the required sensors are already there.

Yes, people should use the parking brake. But they don't. I even had a driving instructor get after me for using it, he said it was "unnecessary". So it's not surprising that people don't do it. The vehicle should have basic fail safe setups. Make it possible to override, but have big warnings and noise if they do. If a distracted user can easily miss that the vehicle is not in Park mode with the engine off or doors open, the UI has a serious flaw that needs fixing. We all agree drivers shouldn't be distracted, but they are. Everyone gets in a hurry or something once in a while.

While a death as a result is tragic, I don't think it rises to a fault of the manufacturer that should result in legal action. With the current courts and laws though, it probably does. And the lawyers involved will get millions, affected owners will get a coupon for a free oil change or similar.

Frankly, we wouldn't even be discussing it if it hadn't been a famous/rich person who was killed. Sad as that is.

Comment Just like crypto (Score 1) 313

These are the same people that think we can create cryptography backdoors that can't be abused. In spite of every expert in the field telling them it's impossible.

Firearms have evolved to be amazingly simple, reliable devices. If you add anything to one, even another mechanical safety, you make it more complex and, therefore, less reliable. History has proven that over and over again. They are this way because if you pull one, bodily harm is a given. Either you shoot someone, or they injure or kill you attempting to prevent being shot. In a case like that, you can not accept even a 1% increased risk of failure.

I'd love for them to be idiot proof and still serve their function. That would be an amazing thing. But I don't see any reason to believe it's any more possible than unbreakable backdoored crypto.

Do stupid people store and/or use them improperly? Yes. Just like people store and use all sorts of tools improperly. People still electrocute themselves because they are too damn lazy to go flip the breaker. It's not the tool that's broken. Tragic accidents can happen with every tool.

Comment Re: Maybe we need to vote in a 3rd party? (Score 2) 424

That's a nice idea, but the majority has been brainwashed into believing that any vote that's not D or R is "wasted". Ridiculous, but that's what happened.

Sadly, even the 3rd parties don't give some of us much to work with. I generally like Libertarian ideals, but the reality is that if they got everything they want we would end up with a government by and for the corporations. Which is basically what we have now, other than that they wouldn't bother to try to hide it. Greens would do basically the same, but only for corporations that support environmental causes. Those are the ones with the most support. Constitution party might be good, but are relatively unknown.

The first thing we need is term limits across the board. All the way down to local government.

Then we need to do away with the ridiculous idea that corporations have rights other than those we specifically give them. Corporate personhood needs to be abolished.

Asset forfeiture needs to be abolished as well. I don't mind the idea that you can seize property, but it needs to be in the punishment phase of a trial, not before someone is charged with a crime. And any proceeds from such seizures must not be directly available to enforcement agencies. That's an obvious conflict of interest and they were insane to allow it in the first place.

So, any parties that support such notions? The Pirate party sounds closest.. Not sure that's a good thing.. :)

Comment Re:The old health system is killing jobs and the G (Score 1) 207

The old health system is killing jobs and the GOP wants to kill the new bill as well. Single player will stop jobs from have to deal with health.

How can the health system kill jobs. The new health system IE ObamaCare kills people not jobs . O and by the way it is "Single Payer" NOT "Single Player"

And ObamaCare is NOT "Single Payer". I might have a LITTLE respect for it if it were, but it's the same old crap system with more overhead. There's change I can believe in right there.... sigh....

Comment Need more data.... (Score 1) 397

Offline, I would suggest a pair of HDD docks/hot-swap bays. SATA, with normal HDDs. Put them in a ZFS mirror and keep track of which ones go together. ZFS detects bit-rot, the mirror allows you to correct for it. Add in another backup layer as desired, for that size range, you're probably into LTO tape or multi-layer BD... Just make sure to store a checksum so you know if your data is good when you try to read it later. MD5 would probably work fine.

If you're talking ONLINE storage, I would still use HDDs and ZFS, but include a cron job that runs "zpool scrub" on the array to keep it checked for bit-rot. Check the logs and "zpool status" for errors, replace bad drives as they show up. Make sure to use mirrors or RAIDZ. For large HDDs (>1TB?) I'd go with RAIDZ2 or 3-way mirrors. The reconstruction time can fail a second disk...

Comment Re:ZFS (Score 1) 241

ZFS is excellent, but I'm not sure it's a good choice for average home users. They don't understand why they need drives the same size, or build non-redundant arrays and get pissed when one drive takes out the whole array. If you can get them to understand to install new drives in mirror pairs and keep an eye on them so you can replace one when it fails, you might be on to something. A custom distro could be set up to handle this without too much hassle. While I don't like MS tech much, their drive extender thing was ok for home users. WHEN you lose a drive, you can still read the data on the other drives. So it's non-redundant, but it also doesn't lose ALL your data when one drive dies. ZFS and most other raid systems don't either, but try getting most home users to do it right... They will stripe them and think they are so smart for not "wasting" the space.... then scream when their non-backed-up "RAID" dies.

I explain my raidz2 setup to people and the first question when they get the basic stuff is "so you throw away 2 drives?"... sigh... They don't want to spend the $, buy the cheapest USB HDD they can find, then complain to me when that drive crashes and they lose all their data. We can't talk home users into using backups, RAID seems to be completely beyond them. People on /. understand this stuff, but your average home user thinks the computer case is the "hard drive" or "cpu".....

Comment Idiots. (Score 2) 437

I was already done with Sony. They don't even make high quality stuff anymore, it's all disposable junk they charge a premium to put their name on. The last straw was a BluRay movie, a $10 one, refusing to play on my PS3 without a firmware upgrade. WTF?!?!?! It's a PAID FOR MOVIE. Fuck you. Not only that, I think I'm going to start pirating all my media. I don't have to deal with this shit on pirated movies/games.

Comment Re:Collecting data (Score 1) 289

That was my thought on the whole thing as well. If you are stupid enough to broadcast your private data over public airwaves without encryption, you deserve what you get.

It sounds like they really wanted just the MACs for the APs anyway, so they probably ignored everything else, but you need a packet to get the MAC.

It didn't seem unreasonable to me to log a bunch of data, then just go through it later to grab the MAC and line it up with GPS data.

Comment Re:text charges (Score 1) 477

So get off your ass and share the data faster. There's no good reason this stuff should be more than a few seconds delayed. Each transaction is what, 100 bytes or so? No, I don't care that you're running the network on a 1970's era mainframe written in Cobol using punchcards, for what you're charging us, you can afford to upgrade.

Comment Re:We live in a multimedia word (Score 1) 414

Curious. Why would someone's parents reading to them help them understand how to spell the various screwed up words and when to use which version? Hell, I read all the time and I still have trouble with some of them. That's like saying that listening to an audiobook would help you know which version of "there" you should be using.

Comment Re:Stupid (Score 1) 133

Just about anyone can read a PDF. If you send a MS Word doc, you have to wonder what version of Word the other person has. And these days, Macs are popular enough that they might not have Word at all! PDF works, and works for everyone. It would be far simpler to print to PDF, but not everyone has a print driver that can do that. ODF is supposed to fix that, but it probably won't.

Comment Re:What we need... (Score 2) 251

Embed the token into the cards. They don't have a significant cost these days, and it would make the cards significantly more secure. Yes, it makes the cards more expensive than a piece of plastic and a magstripe, but really, it's not THAT much. Particularly when amortized over all the cards in circulation.

If you're going that far, you could also include the PIN entry keypad on the card and use a secure link to make it nearly impossible for an attacker to get your PIN via the capture device.

And, if designed properly, they won't wear out as fast as the old style ones, and they are more secure, so don't have to expire as often. The real expiration is on the CC company servers anyway, and checked when you try to use the card.

The really painful part isn't the cards really, it's the readers. And internet transactions, but that can be handled reasonably if you have a display on the card. It can show you a bunch of numbers to type into the computer after you tell it how much you want to allow the merchant to charge you. Generates a time limited code (one use, good for one minute?) that allows the transaction to process.

Slashdot Top Deals

Real Users are afraid they'll break the machine -- but they're never afraid to break your face.

Working...