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Comment Re:They did the same thing for dual booting Linux (Score 1) 238

I still dual boot -- but I almost never use Windows, which is kind of the point. I don't use it enough to justify paying for a virtualization compatible license, and it's just a static waste of resources to boot in Windows to run Linux under a VM.

I suppose one solution for those instances where you have to boot Windows yet also access stuff in your Linux partition is to use raw partition access in a virtual machine and serve the data over a virtual network server. I know it's possible but it's been so many years since I've had to do it I couldn't comment on how other than to say read the virtualization platform documentation.

Comment Re:Headphone Jack is Pretty Crappy (Score 2) 516

how much more "capability" can you add in such a little space? That's enough for what, maybe 5% more battery time?

Not even. The last number I saw was about 2% for an iPhone. Compared to something like 20% through making the entire phone either 1mm or 2mm thicker.

Apple being Apple, it wouldn't surprise me if they remove the headphone jack, increase the thickness of the phone a smidgen, and claim the "innovative" decision to remove the jack led to a 10% increase in battery size.

Comment Re:It's about the battery backpack, stupid. (Score 1) 56

I can live with a thicker phone, but using ride share services as often as I do, I can't function without my phone these days.

Keep an eye out for the Moto Z Play if you're interest in a less-than-flagship phone. The X Play has a 3650 mAh (or so) battery plus a fast charge, and I regularly get two full days out of it; I can't imagine what I'd have to do to run the battery down in less than a day.

Comment Re:The Verge is 100% wrong (Score 1) 56

History has also shown us that most new ideas fail. Even good ideas.

I agree that the idea of accessories per se, attractive as it is to me, isn't enough to make a product a success these days. However I should point out that back in the day of PDAs it was normal for mobile devices to have a CF or SD slot that could also be used to add features. This was in the day when mobile devices didn't have cell data connections, GPS or even wi-fi, and it was quite common for people to add memory cards, wi-fi, bluetooth, and GPS. I have a box full of accessory cards in my attic.

Handspring, a company that made Palm Pilot clones, initially did very well with their Springboard modules which allowed you to add any kind of functionality to the base system, just like what we're talking about here. Then a few years after introducing the Springboard module Handspring stopped making PDAs altogether in favor of what was then called a "converged device" -- aka a smartphone -- without the slot. It's all about timing; Handspring was perhaps a little ahead of the curve on convergence, but a lot of manufacturers were getting pushed that way because of falling hardware retail prices made it attractive to put more stuff in the base device to keep the price high.

The standard inclusion of GPS + Cloud + Camera + Bluetooth built-in means that there really isn't a need to physically connect a device to a mobile device. The only exception is battery; there is a real need for a more elegant and secure way to extend the operation of a smartphone than plugging it into a powerbank via USB.

But I may be wrong. Maybe there's a compelling use case for a modular architecture that I just haven't thought of yet. That's why I like to see vendors trying something different, although I usually expect them to fail. I've watched tech long enough to realize that success isn't just about an idea being right, it has to come at the right time.

Comment Re:Old stuff "discovered" by the ignorant (Score 1) 504

While I don't necessarily disagree with you, let me point out that orthodox economic models are also based on assumptions that are not entirely true. For example you don't necessarily assume that any one agent (e.g. the central planner) has all the information relevant to making decisions, but you do assume that all relevant information is available to parties making decisions about transactions they'll take part in. That's not true, but it's close enough to being true that the models have practical utility. Oh, and there's the bit about people being rational in their decision-making.

Comment Re:Question (Score 1) 504

Because believe it or not, while working sucks, not working also sucks. You don't know how much you get out of work until you don't have it anymore, and I mean stuff beside money: social interaction, purpose, challenge, someplace to go and someplace to look forward to take a vacation from.

In Sweden they're offering an intriguing compromise: work less, or more precisely work for fewer hours, which isn't precisely the same thing.

Comment Re:Microsoft Involvement (Score 3, Insightful) 122

Raise your hand if you didn't see this coming. Frankly, I'm shocked that people stayed with Cyanogen, Inc. after Microsoft got involved.

Before they got involved with Microsoft, they'd already screwed over OnePlus, their first and highest profile CyanogenOS customer. OnePlus immediately turned around and basically demonstrated that they didn't actually need Cyanogen to deliver a decent Android.

That and the dipshit blathering about putting a bullet through Google's head probably did more damage than Microsoft did.

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