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Submission + - Apple Releases First Preview of Swift 3.0 (macrumors.com)

DaGoatSpanka writes: Apple yesterday released the first preview build of Swift 3.0, a major update to Apple's open source Swift programming language. Swift 3.0's official release is expected to come in late 2016 after proposed changes are finalized.

The Swift 3.0 preview can be downloaded from the official Swift website. There are versions of Swift 3.0 available for Xcode 7.2, Ubuntu 14.04, and Ubuntu 15.10.

Microsoft

Submission + - Office Space II: Bill Lumbergh Takes Microsoft

theodp writes: 'Mmm, yeah, I'm going to have to go ahead and ask you to pay $6,120 to come in to work on Sunday.' In a move that would do Bill Lumbergh (YouTube homage) proud, Microsoft has been pulling in about $25 million a year through its unusual practice of charging its vendors for occupying office space on its campus while working on Microsoft projects, according to the real estate firm that manages the program. And that's before a planned July 1st rate increase that Microsoft informed vendors of earlier this week, which will boost the 'chargeback' rate for its 'shadow workforce' from $450 per month ($5,400 per year) for every workstation to $510 per month (or $6,120 per year). So, is there a discount if you're moved downstairs into Storage B?
Open Source

Submission + - PostgreSQL Repositories Locked Down as Security Vulnerability Gets Fixed (paritynews.com)

hypnosec writes: PostgreSQL database has a ‘sufficiently bad’ security vulnerability because of which its developers have announced that they have locked down access to database’s repositories while they are fixing the issue. Developers have also revealed that the lock down is only temporary and during this phase committers will have access to the repositories. The reason for the lockdown is to ensure that malicious users don’t work out an exploit by monitoring the changes to the source code while it is being implemented to fix the flaw. The lockdown is definitely an exceptional one and the core committee has announced that they "apologize in advance for any disruption" adding that "It seems necessary in this instance, however".

Comment Re:Design your own coding system (Score 1) 499

Lots of sites with mandatory periodic password changes won't let you pick a password that is "too similar" to a previous one. Do you run into that problem?

Awhile back, one of my systems kept rejecting attempts to change my password. The stated reason was unclear, but I suspect it was because it was "too similar". Ultimately, I used a pw that would have gotten my mouth washed with soap.

Comment Re:This DOES NOT COMPUTE (Score 1) 144

I'm comparing a solar panel in space with a solar panel on Earth

Fair enough. But then you also need to factor in the cost of either a night time power supply or energy storage capabilities.

Plus, since northern latitudes don't really get great sun a good percent of the year, you'll need a way to provide them with the added power they'll need.

and cloudy places, power during dust storms, or anything else that might obstruct the terrestrial panels.

I agree it's a *very* ambitious plan that may or may not be feasible, but you do need to make sure the results are the same (full 24/hr power) before making a true comparison.

Besides, have you ever seen a rocket? Not exactly green power!

you mean like the H2+O2=H2O rocket that powers the space shuttle and Delta IVs? Obviously the Shuttle SRB's aren't exactly green but quite a bit of the Shuttle's thrust is actually quite green. (or at least could be assuming solar power to produce the H2 & O2)

Comment "Probably didn't know this?" (Score 0) 264

I wonder what percentage of slashdot readers *actually* didn't know about wearable computers. Probably less than 20%. The means of taking a gumstix, attaching a bluetooth twiddler, and a kopin eyepiece and looking like one of the Borg is pretty widespread knowledge. Or just mounting a smartphone on your waist and using it with a bluetooth keyboard and an audial interface.

Comment Re:People aren't robots (Score 1) 709

"Staring out of the window" can be very much a part of studying. If by studying you mean "learning the book by heart, page by page" it is not. If you mean "real" studying, ie. trying to think about the subject matter, learning not just what and how but also why something is the way it is you'll find yourself looking at the window (or the table or the floor, or picking your nose or whatever) more often than not.

I stared out the window while I was studying to watch the cars drive and people walk.

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