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Comment Re:I'm shocked. (Score 1) 528

You're talking about a fundamentally different situation to the rest of us here.

In your example, a remote service on which some functionality depended was disabled. Obviously anything that depends on some remote facility can be affected by changes there, regardless of changes to the local machine. This is a real danger of the kind of always-online systems we have today, and it can be (and certainly has been) abused by developers, but I don't think it was what the rest of us were talking about in this particular discussion.

What we were talking about before was whether Microsoft could forcibly affect a Windows 7 system itself to disable functionality, analogously to the Windows 10 updates that started this discussion. The only change to a local machine in your example appears to be via a software update, which you can choose not to install on Windows 7, while not everyone on Windows 10 has that option, short of actively circumventing Microsoft's system.

The Anniversary update for Windows 10 is particularly troubling, because up to now the only way to restore some of the control that earlier versions of Windows offered (notably including controlling Windows updates themselves) on Windows 10 Pro has been through group policies, and Microsoft have now demonstrated that they are willing to remove even that control mechanism if it suits them.

Comment Re:What the hell? $600K? (Score 1) 57

Just the accounting you'd need to sell the thing to the government would cost you $100K. Oh, and you'd have to pay yourself or someone else to take part in the bidding process or apply for the granted, and that has to be recouped as part of the sale cost. Er... you were planning on paying yourself for your time, weren't you?

Also, there's a big difference between building a prototype from junk you scrounged and building a reproducible product. When you build a product the second copy should be exactly the same as the first but cost less. Duplicating a one-off prototype exactly usually costs more. Why? Proof of concept prototypes are cheap because you make them with surplus stuff you have lying around or can buy for fractions of a penny on the dollar. You can be opportunistic. The problem is any particular set of opportunities (e..g the $10,000 assembly you picked up at auction for $50) aren't reproducible.

I had a colleague whose first job out of school was writing up a detailed specification for a prototype midget submarine a defense research lab built for the Navy. The Navy was pleased at the low cost and so they wanted to be able to build a second one just like it. Well it turned out that a second one would have cost a hundred times as much they'd have had to pay manufacturers to reverse engineer stuff or start up production lines. It was one of the pointless, futile tasks you dump on newbie engineers before you know you can trust their work.

Comment Re:Basic Journalism... (Score 2, Insightful) 151

That's an asinine argument. Other people who should do it don't do it, so I won't do it either.

Wikileaks won't do it because Assange is a chaos-monger posing as a crusader. Wikileaks should do curate its leaks because when you possess information you act responsibly with it, e.g., don't expose people it is about to identity fraud.

Comment Re:Freedom of speech requires a person... (Score 1) 172

Most of all it requires public space.

I can declare that in my house I don't want to hear duck jokes. Why? Because it's my house. My house, my rules, don't like them, get the FUCK out! Government cannot demand from me that I allow you to tell duck jokes in my house. Government's right to demand that anyone can say what they want ends right at where my private property starts.

They must not keep you from telling duck jokes in your home, or on the street, and neither do I have the right to keep you from doing so, no matter how much I dislike duck jokes. You may do so freely in the privacy of your home and even on public ground.

But not on mine! And neither am I in any way obligated to allow some Donald Duck or that Hillary Chick to tell me their jokes.

Also freedom of speech does not entail obligation to listen. You are free to speak. But I am free to ignore you.

Comment Re:Vote with your vote (Score 1) 172

This. Simply tell them, since it's shooting or hanging this time around anyway, so it doesn't really matter whether a crook or a clown rules you, you originally wanted to make your decision based on the flip of a coin, but now it's going to be which party is going to piss you off via pestering phone calls less.

And the length of the call also goes into this consideration.

Now that you know this, is there anything left you want to tell me?

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