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Comment Re:Buzzword du jour (Score 1) 72

So DB Cooper gets to get on the plane? Good to know! Though anti escape systems like the 'Cooper vane' may require some work to get around...

Also... can you describe the implementation of isMuslim()? Given the criticisms of Trumps old Muslim ban, I'd be curious to know if you've a better algorithm... as he or someone else may be interested in your IP.

Comment Re:Not Unexpected (Score 1) 89

Really, they are only strictly interpreting the text of the law as written - legislating from the bench is against the separation of powers defined in the Constitution. What needs to happen now is an updated law to clarify this to the original intent (and hopefully grant amnesty to anyone wrongly covered). Doubtful that will ever happen, but that's what should happen.

I'm not sure what needs to be clarified, a repeat offender seems like a common and trivial concept that the District Court completely messed up by tying it to a particular action. The entire point of using the word repeated is to punish a consistent pattern of behavior, it applies to everything from shoplifters to serial killers. Why should downloaders be an exception? For that matter, why should uploaders be singled out in particular? If I screw up and put something in my shared folder that I shouldn't have it's still one bad act from me. That does not make me a repeat infringer even if I shared a hundred songs and a thousand people took the opportunity to download from me. It just means I screwed up big, once. Same way getting into one fight and hurting four people is not the same as getting into four separate fights and hurting someone each time. The former is still an isolated incident, the latter a repeating pattern.

Comment Re: But..... (Score 1) 172

Did you miss the comment about 'small form factor pc'?

Why be satisfied with 28" when you can plug one of these into something bigger? http://www.intel.com/content/w...

Once you get to the "Nano-ITX or Pico-ITX sized devices, or just a single-board computer, USB or eSATA are your only expansion options.

So no, the upgradibility of this device is not much of a surprise, and likely not an issue for it's target market.

Comment Re:Innovative! (Score 1) 43

Not stopping with TV, how cool would it be if Amazon made recommendations to be based on my past purchases?

Indeed. It looks as if you bought an 8GB USB flash drive. Have you considered this other brand of 8GB USB flash drive? What about this 16GB USB flash drive? I've been using Amazon since the late '90s and they have yet to recommend anything that I actually want to buy. You'd have thought 'you bought books 1 and 2 in this series, would you like to buy book 3?' wouldn't be too hard, but apparently it is.

Comment Re:$3000 BASE PRICE?!?!? (Score 1) 172

but... but... gorilla arms!

After you are used to a touch based device, sometimes, especially when you are not immediately sitting in front of it (say... same room?) it's just more natural to be able to reach over and touch the screen on occasion to do something, rather than reach for your mouse, find your cursor then move it to the desired location.

Comment Re:Aren't they too power-hungry? (Score 1) 67

It's Intel. When most people say IoT, they mean 'embedded thing that can run a network stack, low power, probably powered by batteries'. When Intel says IoT, they mean something subtly different: 'computer, plugged into the mains, probably running Windows'. The overlap between the two is that they're both talking about insecure systems connected to the Internet.

Comment Re:Least worst (Score 1) 897

Voting for a third party candidate who might get 2% of the vote is a waste of time. It just is.

No it isn't. The difference between winning and losing is often not much more than 2% in these races. If a candidate next time around looks at your candidate and says 'if I adopt those policies, I can pick up another 2% of the vote,' then you're likely to have a lot more impact than voting for whatever they claimed previously.

Comment Re: Hmm (Score 1) 897

While mostly true, for a medical doctor she still willingly hinted at buying into standard anti-vaccination stupidity (whether sincere or not, that's a problem).

That's not at all what she said. She pointed out that there's a lot of regulatory capture at the FDA and that, while the anti-vax hysteria was nonsense, the approval process for drugs needs a lot of reform. This then somehow was spun as 'she's an anti-vaxxer'.

Comment Re:Simplicity can only go so far (Score 1) 505

Apple has always supported control-click for right click. It's over a decade since all Apple-supplied pointing devices have included a right-click interface (two-finger click on laptops for the last 6 years). It's built into most of the standard Cocoa view classes to produce a context menu and anything that involves text editing has a default one wired up, so all applications support it without needing any extra code.

The Apple HIGs tell you not to rely on right click being possible, which turns out to be a really good thing if you need to use a touchscreen.

Comment Re:How is everyone supposed to use Emacs? (Score 1) 505

Somehow, you post has made me really want one of these: a 15cm square escape key, with 'Escape!' written in large letters across it, that I can hammer with a fist sounds like an excellent idea. You just need another one that has control-Z (or command-Z) next to it...

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