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Comment Re:Not useful at all (Score 1) 890 workers, plumbers....they're making $12-$19 an hour.

If your only making in that range as a construction worker you probably screwed up big time or are a high schooler / college student working in the summer. I made $17 swinging a hammer in the summer in the late 90s working construction in the summer when I was in college. One of my neighbors is a plumber and is self employed and pulls in $50/hr and the neighbor across the street is semi-retired general contractor so he only takes jobs he wants and make $45/hr. Skilled hard labor pays quite well, just ask my other neighbor who is a master mechanic who makes more than his wife who is in IT.

Submission + - When is it OK to mine hacked emails? (

mirandakatz writes: The recent WikiLeaks dumps and subsequent news reports beg the question: what should journalists do when presented with hacked personal emails, especially since this situation may become the new normal? How do you parse out the newsworthy from the insider gossip? Is it ever really OK to publish scoops mined from illegally obtained emails? At Backchannel, Steven Levy wants to know what you think—and whether there should be guidelines for reporters in these types of situations.

Submission + - Wikileaks precommits mean a big drop is coming, not that Assange is dead. (

argStyopa writes: Wikileaks has issued 3 precommits, which are crypto 'signatures' meant to confirm later data is genuine. This is likely tied to their post:
"Julian Assange's internet link has been intentionally severed by a state party. We have activated the appropriate contingency plans."
It should be taken as implied that either these precommits are in advance of an important dump, or simply as a preventative against more state-level attacks on their releases.

Submission + - The mathematics of the American Justice System (

Bob the Super Hamste writes: The BBC is reporting on the Compas assessment, Correctional Offender Management Profiling for Alternative Sanctions. This tool is used by a number of agencies to assess if someone is likely to commit additional crimes and the resulting score is used in determining bail, sentencing, or determining parole. The article points out that while the questions on the assessment do not include race the resulting score may be correlated with race but this is disputed by the software's creators. The assessment scores someone on a 10 point scale but the algorithm used to determine someone's score is kept secret. Because of this defendants are unable to effectively dispute that the score is incorrect.

Submission + - WikiLeaks says Assange's internet link was severed by 'state party' (

retroworks writes: WikiLeaks said Monday that its founder Julian Assange’s internet link was severed by a “state party” and that “appropriate contingency plans” were activated.

The website’s announcement came hours after it published three cryptic tweets. The messages referenced Ecuador, Secretary of State John Kerry and the United Kingdom’s Foreign Commonwealth Office. Each tweet was matched with a string of numbers. Rumors on Reddit and Twitter said that the numbers triggered a so-called “dead man’s switch,” which could be enacted in case Assange did die. Gizmodo reported that such switches do exist,

Submission + - GOP headquarters in North Carolina destroyed by firebomb (

haruchai writes: The Republican Party offices in North Carolina's Orange County was hit by a firebomb last night and warnings for the "Nazi GOPers" to leave town were painted on a nearby building. Clinton supporters on Facebook were quick to blame it on radical rightwingers, comparing it to the Reichstag fire of 1933 that allowed the Nazis to become the dominant party and has long been suspected of being a "false flag".
As some Dems have claimed, "why would we do this? We're winning"

Comment Re:How long has Podesta's email been compromised? (Score 1) 269

If it is a backup then you have at least a second copy. If it is an important document keep multiple copies. USB flash drive are cheap and there are good options for encryption available. So the solution is to just backup the stuff you don't want to loose and if bringing someplace else where others would have access just encrypt it. I have copies of my important data in several places on USB drive, one in my desk at home, one in my pocket, one in the fire chest at home, one in my desk at work. All of the data is encrypted with a strong password.

Comment Re: $300 or $400 for map update (Score 1) 310

While not the question asker I had assumed it was a split half cord of wood. Also for buying in bulk $8.69/lb seems awfully high to me. I got a 1/3 this year as my dad, myself, and my sister split a whole one and it only cost us $4.27/lb based on hanging weight (I think that is what is was but I know it was in the $4.2x range) although we pay the farmer directly for the cow and pay the processor for the processing. This is also grass fed, well alfalfa, from a small herd of 12-14 cattle on 35 acres and isn't pumped full of hormones and antibiotics. The farmer grinds about $100 worth of minerals into the silage for them each week to ensure that they are getting everything they need and in 37 years he has only lost 2 cattle, one in '96 when it got really cold up here in Minnesota and a calf about 5 years ago to wolves.

As for the amount of ground beef you can turn that into all sorts of delicious things like tacos, burgers, chili, meat cheese and spinach stuffed ravioli, Swedish meat balls, etc. so it isn't a problem.

Comment Re:While this is a very tacky response... (Score 1) 813

I'd be fine with that but it hasn't happened to me yet and if it did I'm a big enough of an asshole that I would fight to the bitter end. The problem is that far too few people will. And yes I have made life difficult for TSA agents.

For example on a business trip last year one of their roving morons wanted to search my bag after I had already gone through the checkpoint (I still refuse to go into the scanner machine just so they have to divert resources). The agent politely asked if they can search my bag. My response was a polite no and went back to what I was doing. The TSA agent had likely never been told not so they asked again and again I responded with a no. At this point the agent got on their radio and called for a supervisor. After several minutes the supervisor showed up and asked me if they could search my bag. I told the supervisor no as well and continued on with what I was doing. The original agent and the supervisor had a little discussion and called for what I assume was a higher supervisor who showed up a few minutes later. This supervisor told me that they were going to search my bag and my loud response (so that others around me could clearly hear it) was that I do not consent to this search and that they have neither probabal cause nor reasonable suspicion to search my bag and that by searching my bag they are violating my 4th amendment rights. I then proceeded to continue sitting in my chair. They searched my bag and found a pair of pants, tooth brush, tooth paste, deodorant, hair brush, a couple of shirts, a couple of pairs of socks, a couple pairs of underwear, my work laptop, and the power cable for my work laptop. I had a number of onlookers who I'm sure were waiting to see if I would get tazed into next week. Being a well dressed white guy probably helped to ensure I didn't get tazed so if I enjoy that privilege at least I am using it to try to preserver the rights of everyone.

Comment Re:WF is corrupt to the core (Score 1) 104

Of all of the federal government agencies I have had to deal with the CFPB is one I wouldn't mind dealing with again. Earlier this year I put the screws to a collection agency that fucked up really bad with me and got the CFPB, MN Department of Commerce, and MN Attorney General set upon them. I would probably take a similar route if I was a Wells Fargo customer that had this done to them because I can be a raging asshole to those who draw my ire.

Comment Re:While this is a very tacky response... (Score 3, Insightful) 813

I find that consistently being a thorn in their side gets good results. My soon to be former congress critter John Kline suffered from this. I was invited to one of his constituent town halls once and he was on a tear about bringing out troops home from Obama's wars and I asked him when we would be bringing all of our troops home. He blathered on about how he agreed with this and that we should bring troops home from Obama's wars as soon as possible. I responded that I was referring to bring all of our troops home that we also have stationed in Europe and Asia as Europe are big boys and that China, Japan, Korea, and India need to step up and take care of their parts of the world and that we don't need to play world police. I never got invited back to one of his town halls but he has called me personally twice since then when I have written him and after the first call has always responded to my letters personally. The first time he called me was about my letter on the USA FREEDOM act where he disagreed with my assessment of what it would do and said that the law didn't say that. My response that he was either retarded or willfully ignorant and then I read him the part of the proposed law that said exactly what I was complaining about. I pointed out that I would be informing everyone I know about this and working diligently to show that he is unfit for office. The thing is that you have to keep after them and follow through otherwise they forget and I usually send about one letter a week to my US elected officials. I feel that I am somewhat responsible for his decision to not run again and the world may be a better place, but neither Angie Craig, or Jason Lewis seem all that great either but at least Lewis has taken a stance on things instead of offering platitudes.

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