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Comment Re:FINALLY (Score 4, Informative) 89

Depends on the technology. The failure mode for a lot of aircraft is that they simply glide to the ground. Even helicopters / autogyros do something similar - there's still a lot of momentum in the rotors and you sycamore down to the ground. It's not like the antigravity suddenly fails and you're back to having weight again.

When I was learning to fly, engine failure was one of the things that I had to practice a lot. Engine failure immediately after takeoff is potentially dangerous, because you don't have an engine and you don't have enough speed or altitude to go very far. You typically have to land in a field (or, if you don't want to damage your aircraft in a training exercise, you throttle the engine back and feather the prop, then line up your emergency landing and turn the engine back to maximum late in the approach so that you stay in the air).

User Journal

Journal Journal: As predicted ACA and insurance are incompatible.

An article in nytimes shows that millions of Americans choose not to pay insurance premiums but instead only get insurance coverage when they need it because the premiums are more expensive than government penalties of not buying insurance and because simultaneously the government forces the insurance companies to cover anybody regardless of any pre-existing conditions.

Comment Re:Interesting, but probably irrelevant (Score 1) 106

However, if you load up your torrent manager and say "download please!" you are making your own copy, which is then stored locally, just like pushing the button on a copy machine.

Only if you actually made a durable copy of the file, and they won't have any evidence of that from the network traffic. All they know is that someone else sent a copy of the file to you. That would support a case against the uploader, but not the downloader. It might be enough to get a warrant to examine the downloader's device for a stored copy of the file, but it's unlikely anyone would go to the effort of actually serving a warrant to recover, at most, a small multiple of the retail value of one copy of a single work, and until they do so there is nothing to support a charge of copyright infringement.

Of course the root of the problem is copyright. This is just one of the more notably absurd, and yet inevitable, consequences of trying to impose artificial scarcity on something that can be duplicated by anyone at effectively zero cost.

Comment Re:and if I shoplift a rack full of CD's it's just (Score 1) 106

Suppose I download a song to the same computer twice, as can easily happen. Technically because the thing I did wrong was copying, ...

No, you're making the same mistake as the judge in the article. The one who makes the copy and distributes it across the Internet is always the uploader, not the downloader. You didn't make a copy, the person who uploaded the file to you made a copy. The DMCA should not be considered applicable to "mere downloaders" because "mere downloaders" aren't doing anything which would infringe on copyright, namely making or distributing copies or publicly performing the work. That's all on the uploaders.

You do make a very good point, however, about the way the impact to the copyright holder for each copy is grossly overestimated when calculating "damages".

Comment Re:Innovative! (Score 1) 45

Not stopping with TV, how cool would it be if Amazon made recommendations to be based on my past purchases?

Indeed. It looks as if you bought an 8GB USB flash drive. Have you considered this other brand of 8GB USB flash drive? What about this 16GB USB flash drive? I've been using Amazon since the late '90s and they have yet to recommend anything that I actually want to buy. You'd have thought 'you bought books 1 and 2 in this series, would you like to buy book 3?' wouldn't be too hard, but apparently it is.

Comment Re:Saw this coming years ago. (Score 1) 200

Which is why Internet access should be a public utility, and not left to the private sector.

The last thing I want is local, state, or federal government being my ISP. Customer service from any of those entities, for anything in which they engage, is worse than any ISP, mom-and-pop or national. It's like watching Medicate or the VA, and then saying that going to the doctor for an ear infection should be a trip to a government office.

Comment Re:Aren't they too power-hungry? (Score 1) 68

It's Intel. When most people say IoT, they mean 'embedded thing that can run a network stack, low power, probably powered by batteries'. When Intel says IoT, they mean something subtly different: 'computer, plugged into the mains, probably running Windows'. The overlap between the two is that they're both talking about insecure systems connected to the Internet.

Comment Re:Least worst (Score 1) 961

Voting for a third party candidate who might get 2% of the vote is a waste of time. It just is.

No it isn't. The difference between winning and losing is often not much more than 2% in these races. If a candidate next time around looks at your candidate and says 'if I adopt those policies, I can pick up another 2% of the vote,' then you're likely to have a lot more impact than voting for whatever they claimed previously.

Comment Re: Hmm (Score 1) 961

While mostly true, for a medical doctor she still willingly hinted at buying into standard anti-vaccination stupidity (whether sincere or not, that's a problem).

That's not at all what she said. She pointed out that there's a lot of regulatory capture at the FDA and that, while the anti-vax hysteria was nonsense, the approval process for drugs needs a lot of reform. This then somehow was spun as 'she's an anti-vaxxer'.

Comment Re:Simplicity can only go so far (Score 1) 517

Apple has always supported control-click for right click. It's over a decade since all Apple-supplied pointing devices have included a right-click interface (two-finger click on laptops for the last 6 years). It's built into most of the standard Cocoa view classes to produce a context menu and anything that involves text editing has a default one wired up, so all applications support it without needing any extra code.

The Apple HIGs tell you not to rely on right click being possible, which turns out to be a really good thing if you need to use a touchscreen.

Comment Re:How is everyone supposed to use Emacs? (Score 1) 517

Somehow, you post has made me really want one of these: a 15cm square escape key, with 'Escape!' written in large letters across it, that I can hammer with a fist sounds like an excellent idea. You just need another one that has control-Z (or command-Z) next to it...

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