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Comment Re:One hour of basketball dunking per day. (Score 1) 137

But we do introduce the game of basketball to students in phys ed. Some students won't have been exposed to it until then, and maybe it's a thing they like to do. We introduce a lot of different physical activities in phys ed class. That's what it's for!

You're not going to write a AAA game or whatever in hour-of-code class, but you're not going to do nothing but dunk in 40minutes of basketball class, either. In both cases you're going to go over just enough of the basics to hopefully have 5-10 minutes at the end to do something fun.

Comment Re:History repeat itself. (Score 1) 137

The only thing that could bring that future about would be AI that writes the programs for us.

Other than that, we're not going to run out of things that need to be stuffed in databases and crunched. As the databases or coding for databases becomes more efficient, governemnts will take advantage of the opportunity to demand even more things be tracked and ever more complicated legal requirements to be satisfied.

Comment Re:Growing Pains (Score 2) 102

It honestly never crossed my mind that dealers would be apt in this case. I fully expect that the dealer you sell it to not to bother at all with any electronic stuff, and the original dealer not to have any idea how to do a full factory reset of any data-retaining components (if that's even possible), and certainly no interest in telling you how to do it since you're not going to be a customer any more.

Comment Re: I wish people were that smart (Score 4, Insightful) 353

You say this as if it makes sense for the accounting rules to tilt the scales in favor of an objectively and substantially more costly practice simply to make compliance with the accounting rules themselves easier. To me, this seems like an argument that the accounting rules need reform.

Comment Re:Well Trump has one thing right (Score 5, Insightful) 540

Yes. Right now the US has a huge crony capitalism problem, that's been built upon by decades of democrats and republicans. And they're fighting tooth and fucking nail to stop Trump anyway they can from breaking their gravy train.

The language you use to describe the problem is hurting your ability to solve the problem. You could as much call it crony socialism and be describing exactly the same thing, but the solutions that would get proposed would look somewhat different (and would invariably fail to eliminate the crony component, which is the actual loathsome bit.)

We have a problem with politically connected entities being able to obtain special privileges for themselves at the public's expense.

Comment Re:durable intent (Score 3, Insightful) 209

So, when can we see some graduates of this "college" start to work on Apple's deficiencies? They're sitting on the cusp of riding a managed decline into irrelevancy over the next decade or so. The only thing they seem to have going for them any more is that if you care at all for personal security, you can't afford to buy a device from pretty much any of their competitors, and they're fast trying to give that up as well.

Do they really want to go back to the days when they had to beg Microsoft to keep them alive? Where they, too, can string along as an also-ran, kept on life-support by the dominate player to avoid anti-trust attention? 'Cause that's really working out well for AMD.

Comment Re:Browsers are fine (Score 1) 766

"Wrong" is harsh, I agree, but I do wonder about folks that have so many tabs open.

Because browsers either don't retain the state when returning to a page with the back button or simply refresh the page and all its resources anyway, which makes reading documentation with several links in it that you need to investigate a laborous experience[1]. Tabs on the other hand refresh when loaded, and on various programmatically triggered events, but not simply because you choose to view them at a particular moment.

A page in a tab that is already loaded will come into view quickly, and they usually retain state information like where you've scrolled to when you return them, which the broken back functionalilty unanimousely fails to do.

Isn't that what bookmarks are for?

No, bookmarks are for retrieving a specific page, or a pre-chosen place in the page via anchor tags. They are neither intended nor expected, nor capable of storing the page state at the time you viewed the page.

You're obviously not flipping between 100+ pages in the course of a single /task/.

Hahah, sure, some tasks don't require that. Other tasks require a lot of tabs open to different pieces of documention that all interact. I don't regularly find myself using 100 tabs for a single task, but I do find myself flipping between two or three tasks where I need six or so disparate pieces of information to be quickly available.

Is that frequency worth the resource load of having the page loaded vs loading the page on demand?

Exactly the opposite. Having the page sitting in a tab reduces the frequency of loading the page and can also be used to push that loading into the background while the user reads other material on the original page. Further, even in the case where pages in tabs have scripts running that tax the machine a bit, it's not the computer's time that's valuable, it's the user's time that's important, so a user will keep tabs open that need to be referred to later as long as they don't impact other pages or applications on the machine.

Is it genuinely faster to find a tiny little tab in a - presumably - rather squashed cluster of 100+ than it is to find a bookmark on a menu and have it load or am I envisioning what 100+ tabs looks like completely, heh, well, "wrong", because I don't do it myself?

It's self-limiting. A user with a good contextual memory might just just jump to the right spot, other users will only be able to do that with fewer tabs, and they will therefore use fewer tabs. You use as many as you can hold in your memory at once. Also, you don't necessarily keep them all in the same browser window. In Chrome, you can have sets of tabs open in separate windows, grouped by whatever criteria you choose. In firefox, you can have tab-groups that hide sets of tabs away entirely until you want to call them forth.

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