Become a fan of Slashdot on Facebook

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Check out the new SourceForge HTML5 internet speed test! No Flash necessary and runs on all devices. ×

Comment Re:Most of the food (Score 1) 1425

On topic: Wealth should not decide elections. I am responding to the suggestion that the relatively small number of urban counties shouldn't count as much as the many rural counties, even though they have many people and drive the economy. Our system is roughly based on population, as it should be.

Off topic: Wealth can be used to acquire or produce food, just like anything else. As a nation, we could abolish our agricultural subsidies and be better off economically.

Comment Make everything pay per view (Score 1) 200

Set it up so that each hour watched costs $1.00. To avoid being charged ridiculously high fees, make it so that you have to confirm you're watching each time the program switches over, or make it confirm every hour that you're still watching. This gets rid of the issue of worrying about what channels you do or don't subscribe to... because you won't need a subscription!

Submission + - Theranos's Elizabeth Holmes witheld bad news from employees (wsj.com)

An anonymous reader writes: "At a presentation to Theranos Inc. employees last month, Elizabeth Holmes displayed a slide saying the company had developed 304 tests using small volumes of blood, according to an attendee. Left unsaid: Most of those experiments hadn’t progressed beyond laboratory research, according to the attendee." In another instance of how Holmes has tried to reframe bad news, Holmes told the WSJ that its withdrawal of nanotainer blood tests from commercial use was entirely voluntary, however FDA records obtained by the WSJ indicate the withdrawal was ordered by the FDA. This pattern of selective disclosure and misinformation has caused employees' trust in the company to fade.

FYI, the article is behind WSJ's paywall. The article can be read by doing a google search of the title and then clicking search result. https://www.google.com/search?...

Submission + - SPAM: The crab nebula's heartbeat, as seen by Hubble and Chandra

StartsWithABang writes: Nearly 1,000 years ago, in 1054, a massive star in the constellation of Taurus, invisible at some 6,500 light years away, exploded in a type II supernova. Today, its remnant measures 10 light years across, while its inner core has a rapidly spinning neutron star that rotates in a mere 30 milliseconds. Hubble and Chandra not only reveal the nebular structure, but also show the inner, pulsing region, revealing matter accelerated by electrons moving at nearly the speed of light. It's a beautiful show unlike anything we've ever seen.

Slashdot Top Deals

10 to the 12th power microphones = 1 Megaphone

Working...