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Comment Not surprising, people who are usually excellent.. (Score 1) 179

...at reverse engineering and cracking tend to be extremely 'pragmatic' in their approach to creating software.

People are constantly confusing programming with software engineering. Look at Google for example, look at the design decisions behind golang. Google has lots of very smart people no doubt, but golang was designed around their pervasive weakness - they do not tend to be good software engineers (experience will usually lead them there though.)

Cloud

Should Cloud Vendors Decrypt Data For The Government? (helpnetsecurity.com) 136

An anonymous Slashdot reader quotes an article by Help Net Security's editor-in-chief: More than one in three IT pros believe cloud providers should turn over encrypted data to the government when asked, according to Bitglass and the Cloud Security Alliance (CSA). 35 percent believe cloud app vendors should be forced to provide government access to encrypted data while 55 percent are opposed. 64 percent of US-based infosec professionals are opposed to government cooperation, compared to only 42 percent of EMEA respondents.
Raj Samani, CTO EMEA at Intel Security, told Help Net Security the answers ranged from "no way, to help yourself, and even to I don't care..." But since vendors can't satisfy both camps, he believes the situation "demands some form of open debate on the best approach to take..."

Comment Re:Security theater (Score 1) 19

It's not security theater - it's not intended to make things 'more secure' - it's intended to allow enterprises (Fortune 100 types) to integrate their existing centralized key management systems into GCE so that they don't have two sets of keys, two sets of audit data, two sets of key policies, et cetera.

This will make it an easier decision for enterprises to push their key-oriented applications/systems/service-bus' into GCE. Previously this was a pain in the rear.

Comment Re:Not Client Side? (Score 2) 19

This is a move by Google to allow enterprise key management systems employed by big business to operate in the Google Cloud (previously a very hacky arrangement.)

I wouldn't be surprised, given Google's new focus on the Enterprise with GCE (note the leadership changes), to see Google Docs starting to embrace a 'bring your own' encryption feature set to its applications as well.

This would be a differentiator for Google as Microsoft's solution (RMS) really doesn't work well in this scenario and Amazon is starting to embrace enterprise key management (but is just starting.)

Google would be the first with a cloud offering, encryption integration points, and an enterprise encrypted document play that could be federated. The fear is, as some other posters noted, will Google commit to this or just do it for 2 years and then dump the whole thing?

Security

WhatsApp Isn't Fully Deleting Its 'Deleted' Chats (theverge.com) 60

Facebook-owned messaging app WhatsApp retains and stores chat logs even after those messages have been deleted, according to iOS researcher Jonathan Zdziarski. The Verge reports: Examining disk images taken from the most recent version of the app, Zdziarski found that the software retains and stores a forensic trace of the chat logs even after the chats have been deleted, creating a potential treasure trove of information for anyone with physical access to the device. The same data could also be recoverable through any remote backup systems in place. In most cases, the data is marked as deleted by the app itself -- but because it has not been overwritten, it is still recoverable through forensic tools. Zdziarski attributed the problem to the SQLite library used in coding the app, which does not overwrite by default. WhatsApp was applauded by many privacy advocates for switching to default end-to-end encryption through the Signal protocol, a process that completed this April. But that system only protects data in transit, preventing carriers and other intermediaries from spying on conversations as they travel across the network.

Comment Re:Arguing over the subjective (Score 2) 523

The easiest distinguishing characteristic between a programmer and a software engineer - empathy for the people who have to test, maintain, document, and extend your code :).

I've always been surprised that people don't consider them separate things (programmers and software engineers) - so maybe it's just me.

Programming

Linus Torvalds In Sweary Rant About Punctuation In Kernel Comments (theregister.co.uk) 523

An anonymous reader shares a report on The Register: Linus Torvalds has unleashed a sweary rant on the Linux Kernel Mailing List, labelling some members "brain-damaged" for their preferred method of punctuating comments. "Can we please get rid of the brain-damaged stupid networking comment syntax style, PLEASE?" the Linux Lord asked last Friday. "If the networking people cannot handle the pure awesomeness that is a balanced and symmetric traditional multi-line C style comments, then instead of the disgusting unbalanced crap that you guys use now, please just go all the way to the C++ mode."Torvalds despises the following two comment-punctuation styles (with his comments):/* This is disgusting drug-induced
* crap, and should die
*/
and:/* This is also very nasty
* and visually unbalanced */
Torvalds prefers the following two styles:/* This is a comment */ and:/*
* This is also a comment, but it can now be cleanly
* split over multiple lines
*/

Social Networks

Facebook Sued for $1 Billion for Alleged Use of Medium for Terror (bloomberg.com) 204

A group of Israelis and American lawyers are suing Facebook for a sum of $1 billion in damages for allegedly facilitating deadly Palestinian militant attacks on their loved ones. The application accuses Facebook of helping Hamas militants plot attacks that killed four Americans and wounded one in Israel, the West Bank and Jerusalem. Bloomberg reports:"Facebook has knowingly provided material support and resources to Hamas in the form of Facebook's online social network platform and communication services,â making it liable for the violence against the five Americans, according to the lawsuit sent to Bloomberg by the office of the Israeli lawyer on the case, Nitsana Darshan-Leitner. Hamas is considered a terrorist organization by the U.S., European Union and Israel. The suit said the group used Facebook to share operational and tactical information with members and followers, posting notices of upcoming demonstrations, road closures, Israeli military actions and instructions to operatives to carry out the attacks.
Canada

Canadian Man Invented a Wheel That Can Make Cars Move Sideways (nationalpost.com) 132

An anonymous reader writes: Canadian man William Liddiard invented a wheel that allows vehicles to move sideways. "True all-way drive for anything with wheels," Liddiard says in an online writeup for his successful prototype of "omni-directional" wheels. They consist of a specialized roller-equipped rim that can move horizontally and a tire that is rounded like a donut. "This is a world first bolt-on application for anything with wheels," wrote Liddiard. "Now you can drive in all directions, and turn on the spot, when needed." His demo video titled "you've never seen a car do this...," has received more than 1.1 million views since it was uploaded on May 10th. The wheels are a "proof of concept" prototype right now, but Liddiard says the design would allow them to be made as durable and safe as standard automotive wheels. Omni-directional wheels are nothing new, though they are typically only used in wheelchairs, robotics and other small-scale applications. Honda Motor Co. debuted an omni-directional wheel at the 2009 Tokyo Motor Show, but it wasn't for a full-sized car -- it was for a Segway-style mobility device. "My wheel can hold ten times more than the other [wheels], while maintaining speed," Liddiard told Postmedia in an interview earlier this year. He's currently trying to sell his invention to a major tire or automotive company.
Power

Sweden Tests World's First Electric Road For Trucks (inhabitat.com) 106

Kristine Lofgren writes: Electric vehicles are cool, but for industrial vehicles it can be a challenge to get very far on just electric power. That's why Sweden is testing out an electric road where e-vehicles can jump on, get juiced while they travel, and get back on the road. The country just opened a two kilometer test stretch in Sandviken on the E16 where electric vehicles can connect to an overhead system that is very similar to light rail. It's another exciting step towards a fossil fuel-free Sweden. Trucks can use the electric power while riding on the special electric road system -- on regular roads they operate as hybrid vehicles. The testing is scheduled to take place until 2018, which should give the country enough time to see how the technology functions in the real world. Sweden's energy and sustainable growth agencies will fund the project in addition to the transport administration.

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