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Comment A lot of sites use Google services (Score 1) 42

the sites they are visiting independently use Google services in some sort of hosting capacity

This is in fact the case. One possible reason for this is that Google's AdSense was the one of the first major ad networks (if not the first) to support HTTPS, beginning in September 2013. Other sites are hosted on Blogspot or Google App Engine, or they include YouTube embeds, Google "+1" buttons, jQuery from Google's CDN, Google Fonts, reCAPTCHA, or Google Analytics.

Comment Let's Encrypt is for domain owners (Score 1) 42

The one weakness of Let's Encrypt is sites on a home LAN that don't have a fully qualified domain. To pass the DNS challenge of Let's Encrypt, you first have to buy a domain. Or is every head of household who owns a router, printer, or NAS supposed to spend $15 per year on a domain?

Comment SNI (TLS virtual hosting) works in all browsers (Score 2) 42

ISPs will often charge dedicated IP and/or certificate maintenance fees

That hasn't been the case since April 2014, when extended support for Internet Explorer on Windows XP ended. Since then, all supported web browsers in wide use have supported Server Name Indication (SNI), which allows the TLS client to specify for which hostname the server should try to present a certificate. WebFaction, for instance, has offered TLS+SNI hosting at no additional charge.

"But I want to support 3-year-old unpatched IE/XP!"
I don't recommend this, because a browser that neither receives security updates nor has been formally proven secure is presumed vulnerable to man-in-the-browser attacks.

Submission + - Spying on Students in the Classroom (eff.org)

schwit1 writes: It seems a day doesn’t go by without another report of a company monitoring what we do on the Internet and selling that data to generate more revenue. And now the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) has examined what happens to the data that's collected from students using technology in the classroom. They released the results of an extensive survey covering students in grades K-12.

What they found was that little work has been done to protect the privacy of the student information that is collected from both the classroom and from using the online software the schools issue for use at home on the students' own devices. They found that while many school districts have embraced technology and all of the benefits it can bring to the schools and students, often little thought has been given to one of the unintended consequences of this: the students' privacy.

The study was very extensive and took two years to complete. Virtually everything was examined, including what's being done along each point from the suppliers of hardware and software and the cloud services, to the schools and the students. They found that lots of data is being collected without permission and that it's easy for outside companies to access the data. They also discovered that there's little to prevent suppliers from sharing data with others, including advertisers.

Comment Re:The obsession with degrees hold good people bac (Score 1) 184

You apparently flunked logic. First, he did not claim degrees are useless at all. He said they are unnecessary for programming. He went on to say that he then chose to get 2 degrees to further his knowledge. Indeed, a degree program is a valid way to do that. It is not the only way to do that.

Comment Marginal cost of Internet distribution: $0.09/GB (Score 1) 68

Unless a work includes material licensed under terms that require payment of residuals per copy, all the work involved in production, editing, and mastering is a sunk cost that was covered by the work's crowdfunding campaign. The marginal cost of distributing a copy of a work is the cost of transmitting it over the Internet, for which AWS charges 0.09 USD per GB.

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"The eleventh commandment was `Thou Shalt Compute' or `Thou Shalt Not Compute' -- I forget which." -- Epigrams in Programming, ACM SIGPLAN Sept. 1982

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