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Submission + - Fedora 18 Systemd Boot Performance Is Mixed (phoronix.com)

An anonymous reader writes: One of the most intrusive and controversal changes in the recent past was the anouncement of systemd (aka: Poetterkits). The developers defend and enforce the adaption, leaving out BSD and other UNIX like operating systems. One of their main selling points was the easy administration and huge performance during Linux boot up.

Phoronix has covered an article with backed up values. They came to the conclusion that: "Due to the user-space slowdown, the overall boot time with Fedora 18 is slower than with Fedora 17 from the Intel x86_64 systems that were used for this preliminary Fedora 18 benchmarking."

I confirm the Phoronix article and even beyond that, systemd doesn't behave as expected. Often it's required to enable or disable a service multiple times to have it either stay enabled or disabled. Even having remaining bits in /etc/rc.x causes a lot of irritation and administration annoyances.

Your Rights Online

Submission + - MIT hacked - in memory of Aaron Swartz (ycombinator.com)

Taco Cowboy writes: The defacing message is pretty deep, too. This is copied from the website, and is not my own. I'm just pasting it so that it's readable here, too:

I used to think I was a pretty good person. I certainly didn’t kill people, for example. But then Peter Singer pointed out that animals were conscious and that eating them led them to be killed and that wasn’t all that morally different from killing people after all. So I became a vegetarian. Again I thought I was a pretty good person. But then Arianna Huffington told me that by driving in a car I was pouring toxic fumes into the air and sending money to foreign dictatorships. So I got a bike instead. But then I realized that my bike seat was sewn by children in foreign sweatshops while its tubing was made by mining metals through ripping up the earth. Indeed, any money I spent was likely to go to oppressing people or destroying the planet in one way or another. And if I happen to make money some of it goes to the government which spends it blowing people up in Afghanistan or Iraq. I thought about just living off of stuff I found in dumpsters, like some friends. That way I wouldn’t be responsible for encouraging its production. But then I realized that some people buy the things they can’t find in dumpsters; if I got to the dumpster and took something before they did, they might buy it instead. The solution seemed clear: I’d have to go off-the-grid and live in a cave, gathering nuts and berries. I’d still probably be exhaling CO2 and using some of the products in the Earth, but probably only in levels that were sustainable. Perhaps you disagree with me that it’s morally wrong to kill animals or blow up people in Afghanistan. But surely you can imagine that it might be, or at least that someone could think it is. And I think it’s similarly clear that eating a hamburger or paying taxes contributes — in a very small way; perhaps only has the possibility of contributing — to those things. Even if you don’t, everyday life has a million ways that are more direct. Personally, I think it’s wrong that I get to sit at a table and gaily devour while someone else delivers more food to my table and a third person slaves over a stove. Every time I order food, I make them do more carrying and slaving. (Perhaps they get some money in return, but surely they’d prefer it if I just gave them the money.) Again, you may not think this wrong but I hope you can admit the possibility. And it’s obviously my fault. Off in the cave, I thought I was safe. But then I read Peter Singer’s latest book. He points out that for as little as a quarter, you can save a child’s life. (E.g. for 27 cents you can buy the oral rehydration salts that will save a child from fatal diarrhea.) Perhaps I was killing people after all. I couldn’t morally make money, for the reasons described above. (Although maybe it’s worth helping fund the bombing of children in Afghanistan in order to help save children in Mozambique.) But instead of living in a cave, I could go to Africa and volunteer my time. Of course, if I do that there are a thousand other things I’m not doing. How can I decide which action I take will save the most lives? Even if I take the time to figuring out, that’s time I’m spending on myself instead of saving lives. It seems impossible to be moral. Not only does everything I do cause great harm, but so does everything I don’t do. Standard accounts of morality assume that it’s difficult, but attainable: don’t lie, don’t cheat, don’t steal. But it seems like living a moral life isn’t even possible. But if morality is unattainable, surely I should simply do the best I can. (Ought implies can, after all.) Peter Singer is a good utilitarian, so perhaps I should try to maximize the good I do for the world. But even this seems like an incredibly onerous standard. I should not just stop eating meat, but animal products altogether. I shouldn’t just stop buying factory-farmed food, I should stop buying altogether. I should take things out of dumpsters other people are unlikely to be searching. I should live someplace where others won’t be disturbed. Of course all this worrying and stress is preventing me from doing any good in the world. I can hardly take a step without thinking about who it hurts. So I decide not to worry about the bad I might be doing and just focus on doing good — screw the rules. But this doesn’t just apply to the rules inspired by Peter Singer. Waiting in line at the checkout counter is keeping me from my life-saving work (and paying will cost me life-saving money) — better just to shoplift. Lying, cheating, any crime can be similarly justified. It seems paradoxical: in my quest to do good I’ve justified doing all sorts of bad. Nobody questioned me when I went out and ordered a juicy steak, but when I shoplift soda everyone recoils. Is there sense in following their rules or are they just another example of the world’s pervasive immorality? Have any philosophers considered this question?

R.I.P Aaron Swartz

Hacked by grand wizard of Lulzsec, Sabu

GOD BLESS AMERICA

Fast Company got a more readable posting: http://www.fastcompany.com/3005001/mit-hacked-pro-aaron-swartz-message-left

NASA

Submission + - LEGO announces a new MINDSTORMS EV3 platform (lego.com)

Barryke writes: Today LEGO announces the new mohawk (NASA's turf) sporting MINDSTORMS EV3 platform, press release:
http://aboutus.lego.com/en-us/news-room/2013/january/new-smarter-stronger-lego-mindstorms-ev3/ (we all like the source)

And with details on its features and innards a story (dutch) at http://tweakers.net/nieuws/86473/lego-kondigt-nieuwe-mindstorms-robotkit-aan.html which in short comes down to:
"Its intelligent brick sports an ARM9-soc running Linux on 64MB RAM and 16MB storage memory, and supports SD cards. There are also four ports, which allow four other 'Bricks' can be connected. The intelligent brick can be reached by WiFi, USB and Bluetooth, and supports control via Android and iOS devices. It comes with 3 servo's, two touch sensors and an IR sensor to track other robots at upto six meters. It also includes 17 build plans, shown in 3D using Adobe Inventor Publisher."

Science

Submission + - Quantum gas goes below absolute zero (nature.com)

mromanuk writes: It may sound less likely than hell freezing over, but physicists have created an atomic gas with a sub-absolute-zero temperature for the first time. Their technique opens the door to generating negative-Kelvin materials and new quantum devices, and it could even help to solve a cosmological mystery.
Education

Submission + - Ask Slashdot: What software is available to help learn about data transmission?

bellwould writes: In teaching information tech to a 13-yr old with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), I've found she's wildly interested in the details of data transmission but not programming. We've had limited success with command-line tools like traceroute and tcpdump, but now I'm seeking tips/advice on software that may help her explore and visualize things like transmission protocols.

Submission + - Google.ro and other RO domains, victims of a possible DNS hijacking attack - Sec (securelist.com)

jansaell writes: There seems to be an ongoing trend to hijack well-known domains. A few weeks earlier it was google.ie (Ireland) and last week it was google in Pakistan, and now its googel in Romania. Earlier today, Softpedia reported that an Algerian hacker using the nickname MCA-CRB has managed to deface the Romanian sites of Google (google.ro) and Yahoo! (yahoo.ro).

Submission + - The Space Sim might make a comeback (arstechnica.com)

Asmodae writes: Chris Roberts, of Wing Commander fame, has a new project out to reinvent the space simulation genre. The videos on the project's home page sport some seriously impressive flight control and physics modeling for a space sim. They are eschewing publishers and using crowd funding to raise development money, but have decided to roll their own instead of using kickstarter. While this has apparently lead to a few technical issues, the project's site is fine now. Here's hoping for a great new space sim!
Space

Submission + - Alpha Centauri has an Earth-sized planet

The Bad Astronomer writes: "Astronomers have announced that the nearest star system in the sky — Alpha Centauri — has an Earth-sized planet orbiting one of its stars. Alpha Cen is technically a three-star system: a binary composed of two stars very much like the Sun, orbited by a third, a red dwarf, much farther out. Using the Doppler technique (looking for very small changes in the velocities of the stars) astronomers detected a planet orbiting the smaller of the two stars in the binary, Alpha Centauri B. The planet has a mass only 1.13 times that of the Earth, making it one of the smallest yet detected.However, it orbits the star only 6 million kilometers out, so it's far too hot to be habitable.

The signal from the planet is extremely weak but solidly detected, giving astronomers even greater hope of being able to find an Earth-like planet orbiting a star in its habitable zone."
Science

Submission + - Female scientists celebrate Ada Lovelace Day (bbc.co.uk)

Dupple writes: Ada Lovelace Day is on 16 October and in London a cabaret-style evening of talks, demonstrations and singing, all performed by women, will mark the event, with additional celebrations planned in Brazil, Slovenia, Sweden, Italy and the US.

The day is named after Ada Lovelace, who worked with inventor Charles Babbage on plans for an "analytical engine" in the 1800s.

Suw Charman-Anderson started Ada Lovelace Day in 2009
The device is now widely regarded as the world's first computer model, and Ms Lovelace as the first computer programmer, although the pair never actually built it.

Privacy

Submission + - Stallman on Unity: Canonical will have to hand over users' data to governments (benjaminkerensa.com)

Giorgio Maone writes: "Ubuntu developer and fellow mozillian Benjamin Kerensa chatted with various people about the new Amazon Product Results in the Ubuntu 12.10 Unity Dash. Among them, Richard Stallman told him that this feature is bad because: 1. "If Canonical gets this data, it will be forced to hand it over to various governments."; 2. Amazon is bad. Concerned people can disable remote data retrieval for any lens and scopes or, more surgically, use sudo apt-get remove unity-lens-shopping."

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