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Comment Disingenuity (Score 1) 143

"What we wanted to do is return to the free market consensus that started in the Clinton administration and that served the internet economy in America very well for many years."

During the Clinton administration, nearly all home internet access was via dial up, and the majority of home internet users had a choice of multiple ISPs, all of whom provided competitive bandwidth and latency.

Chairman Pai, what is your plan for encouraging comparable competitive broadband internet service to the entire US, and why not delay the easing of net neutrality rules until such is achieved?

Comment Re:Not hypocritcal (Score 1) 245

The flaw in your analogy is overlooking that infrastructure roads are public, whereas the infrastructure of the internet is built on private networks. If roads were built and maintained by private entities, they would be within their rights to charge a fee for usage, a.k.a, a toll, right? But they would also be within their rights to vary the price of the toll based on the amount of usage and impact to the roads. We accept this model for toll roads, yet, for some reason, reject it for networks.

We accept higher tolls for heavier vehicles that do more damage to the road. Do you think people would accept different tolls for the same vehicle traveling the same stretch of road, based on what the destination was? Headed to Disney World? Your toll is $10. Universal Studios? $20. Going to visit both? $30. That is where we will end up without either net neutrality or a competitive market for ISPs

The cost of transferring a packet between a subscriber and the internet backbone is the same regardless of the source or destination. ISPs are going to get the right to charge more for certain packets without providing any additional value.

Comment Re:*Ahem* Google Fiber anyone? (Score 1) 245

Google is a competitor to the big ISPs via Google Fiber. Google wants neutrality on their networks for its streaming services, but you know it's not going to scratch their backs if they want full and undiscriminated access to their networks.

Google Fiber serves only a few areas and last I heard had put a halt to its expansion plans.

Maybe if incumbent ISPs start upcharging for YouTube they will reconsider those plans.

Comment Re:alabama (Score 2) 245

On the other hand, this observation doesn't appear to apply to women.

Life expectancy of women at the age of 15 years has however changed dramatically over the last 600 years and by a decade and a half since the mid-Victorian period.

One wonders what socio-economic forces might explain this

Childbirth has become much less hazardous.

Comment Re:NTFS Transactions have been deprecated for year (Score 1) 126

Per MSDN:

Microsoft strongly recommends developers utilize alternative means to achieve your application’s needs. Many scenarios that TxF was developed for can be achieved through simpler and more readily available techniques. Furthermore, TxF may not be available in future versions of Microsoft Windows.

Looks like the future needs to be now.

Comment Re:Can we have a real discussion about economics? (Score 1) 196

Net neutrality rules put greater control of the internet into the hands of the government and large, well-connected corporations like Google, Apple and Facebook. Do we really trust those entities?

Please explain how net neutrality empowers Google, Apple, and Facebook. There is no mention of htis in your linked article; that only talks about government control

Lack of net neutrality puts control of the internet into the hands of Comcast, Verizon, AT&T/Time Warner, et al. I don't trust those entities at all.

What we need most of all is true competition in broadband internet service, which the vast majority of the US does not have.

Comment Re:A sign of times (Score 1) 529

Science does not say "there was nothing and then a big bang that created existence"; it says "everything was in one place before it started spreading out". That is a theory that can be tested by observation (the true difference between science and religion). So far, it has held up.

Comment Greatest Benefit (Score 1) 148

Computing has the Turing Award, technology has the Lemelson-MIT Prize, Mathematics has the Fields Medal, I'm sure other non-Nobel fields have prestigious awards as well.

As for "the greatest benefit to mankind" that Nobel wanted to recognize, the list of Turing Award winners includes those who brought us personal computing, the internet, and the world wide web.

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