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Comment: You can't earn a lot while working for others (Score 3, Informative) 33

by Taco Cowboy (#47924403) Attached to: College Students: Want To Earn More? Take a COBOL Class

Working for others may get you a decent living, but if you really, and I mean, REALLY want to earn a lot of money, working for others won't make you rich

I started by working for high tech companies, some decades ago. Yes, I did earn really decent wages, much better than most of my peers at that time. But I didn't stop there

When I was working, I noticed niche markets that were not being fulfilled. I got out and started my own companies (plural) to do just that

Some of the companies I sold to others, some I kept. A lot of people are working with me right now, but I gotta tell you, no matter how much I pay them (and yes, I do pay my co-workers very handsomely) they still do not earn as much as I

The moral is very simple --- if you really want to be wealthy, stop being a worker, and start being an entrepreneur

+ - Android One's price/performance ratio proves to be inferior!->

Submitted by Taco Cowboy
Taco Cowboy (5327) writes "Slashdot carried the news about the launch of 3 Android One cellphones in India

The truth is, the price / performance ratio of any of the three phones listed was actually ***INFERIOR*** to the entry level smartphones that are on sale in China

For example, in China, consumers are now able to buy a smartphone equipped with a 5-inch display, a 13-megapixel camera and a MediaTek 8-core CPU for US$100. Compare that to the Dream UNO Mi-498, the Android One smartphone from Spice, India, which has a 4.5-inch display, MediaTek 1.3GHz quad-core CPU, 5-megapixel camera, with a price tag of INR7,000, or US$115

If the Chinese smartphone makers can outdo Google in the game, what is the point of Google continuing pushing its Android One phones?

"

Link to Original Source
Programming

College Students: Want To Earn More? Take a COBOL Class 33

Posted by Soulskill
from the lords-of-COBOL-hear-our-prayers dept.
jfruh writes: With a lot of debate over the value of a college education, here's a data point students can use: at one Texas college, students who took an elective COBOL class earned on average $10,000 more a year upon graduation than classmates who hadn't. COBOL, dropped from many curricula years ago as an outdated language, is tenaciously holding on in the industry, as many universities are belatedly starting to realize.

+ - College Students: Want To Earn More? Take A COBOL Class->

Submitted by jfruh
jfruh (300774) writes "With a lot of debate over the value of a college education, here's a data point students can use: at one Texas college, students who took an elective COBOL class earned on average $10,000 more a year upon graduation than classmates who hadn't. COBOL, dropped from many curricula years ago as an outdated language, is tenaciously holding on in the industry, as many universities are belatedly starting to realize."
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Medicine

Farmers Carry Multidrug-Resistant Staph For Weeks Into Local Communities 30

Posted by Soulskill
from the part-of-the-farmhand-insurrection dept.
An anonymous reader writes: Fresh research out of the UNC Gillings and JHU Bloomberg schools of public health shows industrial farm workers are carrying livestock-associated, multidrug-resistant staph into local communities for weeks at a time. "Among the [22 people tested], 10 workers carried antibiotic-resistant strains of the bacteria in their noses for up to four days. Another six workers were intermittent carriers of the bacteria. The 10 workers found to carry the bacteria persistently had strains associated with livestock that were resistant to multiple drugs, and one also carried MRSA. Three more of the workers tested positive for strains of S. aureus that were not resistant to antibiotics. So in total, 86 percent of the workers in the study carried the S. aureus bacteria, compared with about one-third of the population at large, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention." This problem has grown since its last mention on Slashdot. Unfortunately, massive industrial lobbying continues to neuter government action.

Comment: It is ***MUCH MORE*** than that !! (Score 1) 48

by Taco Cowboy (#47923917) Attached to: NSA Director Says Agency Is Still Trying To Figure Out Cyber Operations

We're having coming up with a definition that means "It's fine when we do it, but an act of war if we want it to be when someone does it to us" that passes the laugh test

Remember it's NSA we are talking about

They do not need to speak the truth, and in fact, they have lied to the congress and nobody could do anything to them

In other words, they can declare "An Act of War" any time they want, even if nobody did nothing, because right now, as we speak, NSA is an entity that no one have any right to inspect - not the congress, not the court, and surely, not the White House

+ - Farmers Carry Multidrug-Resistant Staph for Weeks Into Local Communities->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Fresh research out of the UNC Gillings and JHU Bloomberg schools of public health shows industrial farm workers are carrying livestock-associated, multidrug-resistant staph into local communities for weeks at a time. This problem has grown since its last mention on Slashdot. Unfortunately, massive industrial lobbying continues to neuter government action."
Link to Original Source

Comment: They are pretending that they do not know (Score 2) 48

by Taco Cowboy (#47923623) Attached to: NSA Director Says Agency Is Still Trying To Figure Out Cyber Operations

"We're still trying to work our way through distinguishing the difference between criminal hacking and an act of war," said Rogers

NSA supposed to be a government agency filled with very intelligent folks, and they are telling us that they can't differentiate between common hacking (whether it be criminal or otherwise) and an _Act of War_ ?

I dunno about you, but I find it very hard to believe!

Government

NSA Director Says Agency Is Still Trying To Figure Out Cyber Operations 48

Posted by Soulskill
from the i-don't-think-the-mr-magoo-routine-is-going-to-work dept.
Trailrunner7 writes: In a keynote speech at a security conference in Washington on Tuesday, new NSA Director Mike Rogers emphasized a need to establish behavioral norms for cyber war. "We're still trying to work our way through distinguishing the difference between criminal hacking and an act of war," said Rogers. "If this was easy, we would have figured it out years ago. We have a broad consensus about what constitutes an act of war, what's an act of defense." Rogers went on to explain that we need to better establish standardized terminology and standardized norms like those that exist in the realm of nuclear deterrence. Unfortunately, unlike in traditional national defense, we can not assume that the government will be able to completely protect us against cyber-threats because the threat ecosystem is just too broad.

+ - Donâ(TM)t Fear The Leaker: Making Ethical Leaks A Tool For Transparent Gov->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "This paper by law professor Glenn Harlan Reynolds argues that we instead of just fighting leaks, we should be institutionalizing whistleblowing to promote transparency in a post-Snowden era:

Leaks are inevitable. So, it seems, is a government too large and complex to be overseen properly by either the President or Congress. Rather than trying to overcome either of these problems by main force, perhaps it makes sense to address one of these phenomena via the other. While top-down oversight will never be sufficient to do the job, empowering the “little people” of government to blow the whistle on illegalities is likely to limit the worst excesses.

Also, more cowbell. (Via Reason. )"
Link to Original Source

Networking

Why Is It Taking So Long To Secure Internet Routing? 50

Posted by Soulskill
from the adoption-is-driven-by-fear dept.
CowboyRobot writes: We live in an imperfect world where routing-security incidents can still slip past deployed security defenses, and no single routing-security solution can prevent every attacks. Research suggests, however, that the combination of RPKI (Resource Public Key Infrastructure) with prefix filtering could significantly improve routing security; both solutions are based on whitelisting techniques and can reduce the number of autonomous systems that are impacted by prefix hijacks, route leaks, and path-shortening attacks. "People have been aware of BGP’s security issues for almost two decades and have proposed a number of solutions, most of which apply simple and well-understood cryptography or whitelisting techniques. Yet, many of these solutions remain undeployed (or incompletely deployed) in the global Internet, and the vulnerabilities persist. Why is it taking so long to secure BGP?"

+ - Why Is It Taking So Long to Secure Internet Routing?->

Submitted by CowboyRobot
CowboyRobot (671517) writes "We live in an imperfect world where routing-security incidents can still slip past deployed security defenses, and no single routing-security solution can prevent every attacks. Research suggests, however, that the combination of RPKI (Resource Public Key Infrastructure) with prefix filtering could significantly improve routing security; both solutions are based on whitelisting techniques and can reduce the number of autonomous systems that are impacted by prefix hijacks, route leaks, and path-shortening attacks."
Link to Original Source
Windows

What To Expect With Windows 9 296

Posted by Soulskill
from the solid-color-rectangles dept.
snydeq writes: Two weeks before the its official unveiling, this article provides a roundup of what to expect and the open questions around Windows 9, given Build 9834 leaks and confirmations springing up all over the Web. The desktop's Start Menu, Metro apps running in resizable windows on the desktop, virtual desktops, Notification Center, and Storage Sense, are among the presumed features in store for Windows 9. Chief among the open questions are the fates of Internet Explorer, Cortana, and the Metro Start Screen. Changes to Windows 9 will provide an inkling of where Nadella will lead Microsoft in the years ahead. What's your litmus test on Windows 9?

+ - What to Expect With Windows 9

Submitted by snydeq
snydeq (1272828) writes "Two weeks before the its official unveiling, Woody Leonhard provides a roundup of what to expect and the open questions around Windows 9, given Build 9834 leaks and confirmations springing up all over the Web. The desktop's Start Menu, Metro apps running in resizable windows on the desktop, virtual desktops, Notification Center, and Storage Sense, are among the presumed features in store for Windows 9. Chief among the open questions are the fates of Internet Explorer, Cortana, and the Metro Start Screen. Changes to Windows 9 will provide an inkling of where Nadella will lead Microsoft in the years ahead. What's your litmus test on Windows 9?"
Robotics

The Case For a Federal Robotics Commission 49

Posted by Soulskill
from the heading-up-the-anti-singularity-committee dept.
New submitter hmcd31 writes: In a new paper for Brookings' series on the future of civilian robotics, University of Washington Law Professor Ryan Calo argues the need for a Federal Robotics Commission. With advancements such as driverless cars and drones taking to the roads and skies, Calo sees a need for a government agency to monitor these changes. His paper details many benefits a robotics commission could bring, from funding to assisting in law and policy issues. The policies developed by this FRC are argued to be particularly important, as their impact in creating an early infrastructure for robotics could create an environment that lets the technology grow even more.

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