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Comment No, because it sucks. (Score 1) 654 654

I take public transportation occasionally to and from work in San Francisco. But in general, there's a huge amount of crazy homeless people at all hours of the day who take public transportation. The buses are often filthy, and they often don't run on time. it's difficult to get from one place to the other, especially if I need to go multiple places in a single day.

Given the choice, I bike or drive. There's nothing worse than driving along a long stretch of road in SF only to pass a bus stop filled with people who have clearly been there eagerl waiting for the next bus for a long time which you know won't be arriving for another long time since you just came down that same road without seeing a bus. Those poor people. I did that for years. Never again. Even if it's free.

Comment Re:Then what? (Score 2) 77 77

Supposedly it will continue out into the Kupier belt. First that have to get funding to pay for Astronomers to continue the mission, meaning paying the salaries of Astronomers to reprogram and monitor the craft. I don't know if Eris or any of the other larger Kupier belt objects are within easy distance, but it will take a few years for the craft to reach whatever specific object they have planned for it to go to next. It only has a little bit of fuel left for maneuvering, but it has SOME fuel left as I recall so they can probably send it someplace nearby.

Comment Re:This triggers my WW3 theories. (Score 1) 190 190

OK, I'll bite. Confusion and panic are not the same thing. In fact, it turns out that in most cases of massive, unexpected disasters, confusion certainly rules, but almost always people act in a reasonable fashion, even unto their own demise. It's only when there are immediate possibilities of personal danger do people "panic".

Some large scale cyber attack on the US like what you described would likely result in people spending time trying to figure out what was going on at first. We are such an information-based society at this point that SOME information would get through, even if all cable and the internet was shut off and people resorted to radio.

Then, once it slowly became apparent we were under a cyber attack, people would calmly go about trying to pick up the pieces and finding out who was responsible so we could retaliate. There wouldn't be any panic.

Now if we were invaded by aliens, Independence Day-style, and there was evidence of some non-human interference, then yes, the shit would hit the fan.

Comment Re:Just the beginning (Score 2) 190 190

I will. These glitches will be corrected post-haste, as many people's jobs and livelihoods depend on it. I'll go into work as per normal, and the US will continue to create jobs at a reasonable pace and the US will continue to grow for the forseeable future at a relatively static rate.

Comment Re:Your biggest screw up (Score 2) 452 452

I don't actually understand this. It's one thing to give specifics about a termination; it's another to give people a general idea.

Even when CEO's are forced to quit, they will give a boilerplate reason, such as "I'm leaving to pursue other interests."

Can you provide a legal foundation for how Reddit might be at risk of litigation of saying something like "She was let go because we disagreed with her vision of how to operate Reddit."

In what world could reddit be sued for such a bland statement?

Comment Re:"Harbinger of Failure" = Hipsters? (Score 2) 300 300

Ah yes, the much vaunted "Hipster-Hate" of the Slashdot neckbeard crowd. Quick, get on board the Hipster-hate train before it leaves the station! It's cool to hate on "hipsters" now, dontchya know...that's the new trend!

Of course, slavishly following the new hipster-hate trend might make you...wait for it...

a hipster.

Although maybe you neckbeards were hating on hipsters *before it was cool*, in which case you are still hipsters.

See, the great thing about all the stereotypical hipsters I know, and I know quite a few as I live in San Francisco, is that not a single one of them gives two shits about what people on the internet say about their love of organic, artisan food, their facial hair, or their Prius or whatever people think defines a hipster.

Which makes them TRULY cool in my book.

Comment The best BBQ I ever went to (Score 1) 149 149

was one in Berkely at an industrial kiln for scientific equipment. They made chemistry beakers and the like, all to precise standards, using multiple kilns.

Somebody got the bright idea many years ago to roast pigs and slabs of beef in these things. What would normally take hours to cook was done in one or two hours, and I have never had a better pig. It was delicious.

I just hope I didn't get asbestos poisoning.

Comment Re:72 hour roadside suspensions work better (Score 1) 203 203

Except that car drivers are in the majority, they vote, and have power. So when lots of car drivers start getting 72-hr suspensions for minor infractions, you can be sure that they will rapidly replace the municipal leaders who stop "mollycoddling" them. yes urban roads were built for peds and bikes originally. Welcome to the future.

Comment Re:What would Monderman say? (Score 2) 203 203

The problem with this approach is that ambiguity doesn't really mesh well with traffic laws.

Lets say you follow his design approach and you remove curbs, crosswalks and signage from a busy intersection. While trying to navigate through the intersection, I accidentally hit someone who has run into the street. There's no signs, no lights or anything...who is to blame? In California, the pedestrian always has the right of way, but this doesn't make it easy to navigate traffic in a busy city where you are trying to pay attention to 1000 things on the road at once.

Street signs have they benefit of at least attempting to make things predictable. If there is a "Do not cross" light for pedestrians at an intersection when I approach it, I can be reasonably certain that a pedestrian won't run out in front of me...I could easily be wrong, and some idiot could still do it, but most of the time they won't. With no traffic signs/lights, there is no predictability.

Comment And so, what is wrong with this? (Score -1) 83 83

England is dealing with a fairly extensive and real group of Muslim fundamentalists. It's much more noticeable over there than it is here in the states. Are people implying that the government over there shouldn't try to keep track of a group of people who have stated very clearly they would like to see the spread of Islamic law? A group of people that has sent young men to Iraq and Syria to fight and die for ISIS?

Those who claim the dead never return to life haven't ever been around here at quitting time.

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