Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: Re:Something I've been watching... (Score 1) 926

by wilec (#41308311) Attached to: Complex Systems Theorists Predict We're About One Year From Global Food Riots

Vertical gardening is a tool I have used for years to grow space hogging plants in a smaller footprint. For instance I have grown Cantaloupe, small Watermelons and Winter Squash or Pumpkins on 6ft X 6ft X 6-8ft tall frames. They consist of 4 rough cedar, popular or dogwood posts wired to a driven steel fence post, and three or four open slat shipping pallets suspended horizontally with rope ties at the corners. I have grown Sweet Potatoes and Tomatoes om these frames as well. Planting Summer Squash or Pole Beans on an X-Brace frame works well also. Of course most of my Tomatoes are grown on 7ft 2" dia. poles, when they reach the top I usually grow them horizontally on rope attached to the posts.

A really neat way to grow most climbing plants is to use heavy stock fence panels bent 180 deg. into a quonset shape structure tall enough to walk through. Over the years I have come to the decision that, at least in my area, I really need to build a larger structure like a greenhouse over the whole plot in order to get better control of the weather/light levels.

Another nice trick for rural or urban gardeners is to make scattered small plot plantings as landscape features. This works really well for perennial plants like berries or asparagus, but it works well for many annuals too.

wabi-sabi
matthew

 

Comment: package managers are not proof of origin (Score 1) 252

by wilec (#39841551) Attached to: Slackware: I'm Not Dead Yet!
The original SuSE Linux distribution was a German translation of Slackware. Slackware was initially based mostly on SLS. Over the years SuSE Linux incorporated many aspects of other Linux base distros. SuSE incorporated some Red Hat Linux feature and tools , such as its RPM Package Manager and its file structure. wabi sabi Matthew

Comment: Simple thermodymanics (Score 1) 572

by wilec (#39538591) Attached to: Climate Change To Drive Weather Disasters, Say UN Experts
All the whys aside, global temperatures are rising. Higher temperatures directly correlate with increased evaporation rates. Increased evaporation rates result in increased volumes of water vapor in the atmosphere. The latent heat energy in the water vapor means more available energy in the atmosphere. Why would anyone be surprised by larger releases of this energy in weather events, its not like it is going to be destroyed you know. wabi-sabi matthew

Comment: Re:home use? (Score 1) 270

by wilec (#34583836) Attached to: CA's First Molten Salt Energy Plant Approved

You could possibly build a micro turbine or and array of such for power generation, it would be a pretty expensive undertaking so the payback ratio would suck. A better use might be for heating and cooking purposes. The advantages of using a "salt" storage solution are mostly temperature -MAX DEG- and size-BTU/FT3-related. Another material that works well in such a storage application is a liquid metal such as tin/antimony solder. I would think that the best heat transfer medium between collector and storage would be a high temperature silicon oil or maybe paraffin. It would be nice I think to be able to use such to power cooking devices such as ovens and ranges where the ideal temperature requirements could exceed most practical air or water based solar systems. The temperatures here are so far above most home heating needs -except steam based- that the only real advantage would be storage size advantages. It might work very well for adsorption process chillers or refrigerators, these could be fun to build but last I knew used dangerous unstable and/or toxic mediums such ammonia or lithium bromide, maybe some safer compounds are available today.

wabi-sabi
matthew

Comment: Just to start an argument within an argument... (Score 1) 716

by wilec (#34354746) Attached to: Oxford Scientists Say Dogs Are Smarter Than Cats

As someone who has had many dogs in his life I can tell you that there is a very wide differential in the intelligence of dogs. I have found that there are three primary factors in how smart a dog is. Genetics, nutrition, and social interactions with humans and other dogs. Genetically it seems to me that the smartest are hybrids, AKA mutts I guess, of herding dogs. All the smartest dogs I have known were crosses with Border Collies or Australian Shepherds. The smartest I have owned were 3way crosses between these two breeds and Blue Heelers or German Shepherds. Nutrition is very important especially while they are still pups. I train my dogs using real high quality protein like beef, pork, fish or later on preferably vermin, varmint or snake trimmings as the reward. I start training at whelping one at a time on individual pups as you need their focus on you. Later if at all possible I bring litter mates or other pups together in sessions to establish orderly behavior in this mixed social environment. If possible the pups sire and dame can be useful but only after you establish the human/pup relationship. Early on I have involved other family members in the the process, especially kids, but the play time must be separated from the training or at least be last. Of course all I am training them for is general obedience to humans, watch/warn/alert and varmint/vermin eradication and of course a few fun games like good old fetch and hide and seek. There is of course a structure of teaching from the simple to the complex, but basically all that is necessary is to be consistent, persistent, patient, kind, but always be the boss.

matthew

Comment: Re:Fluff piece, sorta (Score 1) 350

by wilec (#30727148) Attached to: Pneumatic Tube Communication In Hospitals

There are in our system for instance, inter zone pipes and rotary mechanical transfer units that act as multi mode staging units or switches, these systems are also capable of using zoning and inter/intra zone processes to allow for parallel operations. Priority management is controlled by several factors/settings for system wide and individual device/object/transaction level control.

I have had daily experience with a 30 something station, two zone and about two dozen transfer unit system for twenty something years. Our system is a SWISSLOGIC mid 90's tech with a low power PC running a DOS application on a RS-422 network. The DOS app runs under an OS/2 VDM or DOS, the newer versions are of course Windows applications. Even so uptime for the system is very good (99%+), but not perfect, occasional sensor or mechanical routing/delivery components can cause hard to resolve failures. Most problems (80%+) however are user related, non latched or inappropriately or overfilled carriers being the most common. Still the system processes about a million transactions a year 24/7/365 mostly unattended. If it fails it gets the attention of the staff before anything else except maybe HVAC, which is my primary area of responsibility of course.

matthew

Comment: Re:Yes, but how much does it cost? (Score 1) 135

by wilec (#30139342) Attached to: Cooling Bags Could Cut Server Cooling Costs By 93%

I don't have time now to RTA but if one was to use say a non conductive, non corrosive refrigerant one could make use of the lower vapor point to more efficantly remove the heat AND even better lower the operating temperature considerably. A split cascaded system would be my choice as you could achieve very low temps with the possibility of modularizing the components so the point of use (the chips) is a relatively small inexpensive unit that is supported by layers of larger systems. Visualize the module as cube with a pair of hoses that connect to larger refrigeration systems, just another connector service like power, data or control. Within the range of the temps allowed by the refrigerant one could very easily throttle the temps depending on need.

Hey we run hundreds of hp high voltage motors immersed in refrigerant every day in industrial settings.
Cascaded freezer systems are common in labs and liquefied gases production uses similar systems on a massive scale.

Just using the benefits of the more efficient heat transfer from immersion and lower vapor point should make for reduced operating costs. Initial costs for todays common hardware is chump change compared the energy costs so there is hope if something can be produced cheap enough.

I personally like the idea of the extremely low operating temps that could be used to enhance performance.

matthew

Comment: I have wonderful penmanship.... (Score 1) 921

by wilec (#28892067) Attached to: 26 Years Old and Can't Write In Cursive

However only for brief volumes, after a paragraph or two it degrades. Somewhat because of the physical strain it places on my 52 year old hands and wrists. I noticed before I became old and decrepit, it also tends to slip in consistent quality when my mental focus outruns the recording movements of my hand.

I create instructive documents, troubleshooting guides, emergency procedures and such. Mostly I type this for obvious reasons like spell checking :). Some of my draft material and my field notes would be considered horrible penmanship but since they are by preference for my eyes only this actually works pretty well. I also produce quite a bit of testing documentation of conditional or corrective action reports. In this case handwritten is almost always given weight over typed material and thus usually preferred or even required. In this case I use what I have learned as "engineering script". It is in all caps consistent in style,form, weight and size. It is very readable and comparatively easy on the body. It is my preferred method of writing.

matthew

Comment: Re:like, whatever (Score 1) 311

by wilec (#27976107) Attached to: Flash Drive Roundup

I remember seeing a bluetooth device a young asian girl was holding that consisted of a speaker and mic connected by a flexible cable with shape memory ability. She had the speaker end wrapped around her thumb and the mic end wrapped around her index finger. Maybe not necessarily ergonomic for extended use, but for damn sure cute.

wabi-sabi
matthew

Comment: Re:Trivia: (Score 1) 311

by wilec (#27976061) Attached to: Flash Drive Roundup

"True. But for those who still have machines running '98, there is a little known generic mass storage driver for '98 that allows use of newer drives that do not come with '98 support."

I concurr, this driver works well for me as well. I installed it on a WIN98 (not a SE box either) box hosting a Metasys FMS isolated network a couple years ago desperate for a free method to back the system up, don't ask why. Since then I have installed a Iomega CD burner with its own driver for backups. Still this generic USB driver served me well then and now and reads every flash drive I have thrown at it 100%, never failed so far, though I am very very very cautious about what is on the flash media and where it has been, remember the box is on an isolated dedicated network for a reason.

Comment: Naw, that won't fix a thing (Score 1) 281

by wilec (#27740769) Attached to: Drug Company Merck Drew Up Doctor "Hit List"

I work in the health care industry too and while I guess it is natural for the crowd here to fixate on the sales WOMEN that Pharma uses to push their products, and yes they are almost exclusively dolls though not always that young. However the sales MEN that often show up with them seem to be almost exclusively ex basket ball players or Esquire models, for the lady doc's I guess or as noted maybe for the gay ones. Same formula seems to apply for implant and surgical materials. I wouldn't know about the goodies and junkets since I am a lowly alarm and controls technician, lucky to get the occasional day old dough nut or el cheapo LED flashlight from some old hairy dude or girly girl wantabe with a twitch. Damn that was mean of me, I'm gonna burn in hell.

wabi-sabi
matthew

"The geeks shall inherit the earth." -- Karl Lehenbauer

Working...