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Comment: Re:Perspective (Score 1) 64

by smooth wombat (#48640825) Attached to: NASA Video Shows What It's Like To Reenter the Earth's Atmosphere
Since asshats like to take vertical movies with their phones,

Or maybe phone makers shouldn't make shitty products which create the sidebars in the first place. You never had this problem when shooting analog movies, it has only occurred when we "upgraded" to digital.

The world doesn't exist only left to right. It also goes up.

+ - TOR network may be attacked->

Submitted by Earthquake Retrofit
Earthquake Retrofit (1372207) writes "The Register is reporting that the Tor Project has warned that its network – used to mask peoples' identities on the internet – may be knocked offline in the coming days.

In a Tor blog post (https://blog.torproject.org) project leader Roger "arma" Dingledine said an unnamed group may seize Tor's directory authority servers before the end of next week. These servers distribute the official lists of relays in the network, which are the systems that route users' traffic around the world to obfuscate their internet connections' public IP addresses."

Link to Original Source

+ - Hackers Used Nasty "SMB Worm" Attack Toolkit Against Sony

Submitted by wiredmikey
wiredmikey (1824622) writes "Just hours after the FBI and President Obama called out North Korea as being responsible for the destructive cyber attack against Sony Pictures, US-CERT issued an alert describing the primary malware used by the attackers, along with indicators of compromise.

While not mentioning Sony by name in its advisory, instead referring to the victim as a “major entertainment company,” US-CERT said that the attackers used a Server Message Block (SMB) Worm Tool to conduct the attacks.

According to the advisory, the SMB Worm Tool is equipped with five components, including a Listening Implant, Lightweight Backdoor, Proxy Tool, Destructive Hard Drive Tool, and Destructive Target Cleaning Tool.

US-CERT also provided a list of the Indicators of Compromise (IOCs), which include C2 IP addresses, Snort signatures for the various components, host based Indicators, potential YARA signatures to detect malware binaries on host machines, and recommended security practices and tactical mitigations."

Comment: Re:Some math (Score 1) 112

by Jeremi (#48639835) Attached to: Tesla About To Start Battery-Swap Pilot Program

Because ... that doesn't happen at some real gas stations?

Of course, real gas stations don't give away free gas to customers who are willing to wait half an hour. If they did, that might cut down considerably on the number of people who were willing to pay $50 to fill up their tank in 3 minutes, and make the "steady line of customers" scenario less likely.

Apples, oranges.

+ - New data says volcanoes, not asteroids, killed dinosaurs

Submitted by schwit1
schwit1 (797399) writes "The uncertainty of science: A careful updating of the geological timeline has strengthened the link between the dinosaur extinction 66 million years ago and a major volcanic event at that time.

A primeval volcanic range in western India known as the Deccan Traps, which were once three times larger than France, began its main phase of eruptions roughly 250,000 years before the Cretaceous-Paleogene, or K-Pg, extinction event, the researchers report in the journal Science. For the next 750,000 years, the volcanoes unleashed more than 1.1 million cubic kilometers (264,000 cubic miles) of lava. The main phase of eruptions comprised about 80-90 percent of the total volume of the Deccan Traps’ lava flow and followed a substantially weaker first phase that began about 1 million years earlier.

The results support the idea that the Deccan Traps played a role in the K-Pg extinction, and challenge the dominant theory that a meteorite impact near present-day Chicxulub, Mexico, was the sole cause of the extinction. The researchers suggest that the Deccan Traps eruptions and the Chicxulub impact need to be considered together when studying and modeling the K-Pg extinction event.

The general public might not know it, but the only ones in the field of dinosaur research that have said the asteroid was the sole cause of the extinction have been planetary scientists."

Comment: Re:3 minutes is slow? (Score 2) 112

by mythosaz (#48638145) Attached to: Tesla About To Start Battery-Swap Pilot Program

There might be 1440 minutes in a day, but people who want their battery full-charge want it to happen probably only in a small portion of those minutes.

The faster you can do it, the more effective you can be.

It's not about getting it done in 3 minutes, it's about being 3rd in line at 7:20am with 35 minutes left on your drive to work.

Comment: Interesting... (Score 1) 112

by mythosaz (#48638123) Attached to: Tesla About To Start Battery-Swap Pilot Program

n.b. The cars in our house are currently a Leaf and an Energi.

When I first scanned the title, I assumed Tesla was providing a battery replacement type swap for degradation. A few lines in, I realized I was looking at a Tesla quick-fill "gas station."

I have to assume that Tesla, should they go wide with a service like this, would be refurbishing batteries as they rotated into and out of the quick-change locations. They'd have a dozen or so, "in stock," charged and charging, and some percentage of those taken in below a certain threshold of remaining charge would have to be refurbished before they could go back out.

You can afford to take your pristine battery into the swap-shop and get one that's only got 88% max potential charge on it. Maybe you only go "pay for a tank of premium gas" when your battery degrades, and you hope for a better one in return :)

Comment: Re:Which is why (Score 1) 306

I ask the same question again, why put this stuff online at all? Why are critical systems for infrastructure online? Why is anything of any importance for our government and nation available to the general Internet?

Because that's how the information gets from (wherever it is stored) to (the people who need to access it). The Internet is popular for a reason, and that reason is that it helps people get things done quickly and cheaply.

The alternative, of course, is to have the information and the people physically co-located, so that they can access the information only via an isolated network (or by physically sitting at the computer the information is stored on).

However, the benefits of remote access are so great that in many cases it's seen as being worth the risk of allowing it. Whether or not that assessment is correct or not depends on an estimate of how secure the networks are, but also on an estimate of how aggressive, competent, and numerous any hostile intruders will be. Clearly it's possible to get both of those estimates wrong, but I'm not sure that a knee-jerk response of "pull all the Ethernet cables and return to the 1950s" is going to be a practical solution either, as doing so would likely cause as much disruption as an actual attack.

I'm not sure what the solution is, but probably one good practice would be a lot more red-teaming -- i.e. if your network is vulnerable to intrusion, it's much better to learn how a friendly intruder got in (by asking him) and fix the hole than to pick up the pieces after a hostile intruder nuked your network.

We will have solar energy as soon as the utility companies solve one technical problem -- how to run a sunbeam through a meter.

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