Follow Slashdot blog updates by subscribing to our blog RSS feed

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: Re:Really? (Score 4, Interesting) 168

by tompaulco (#48893141) Attached to: WhatsApp vs. WhatsApp Plus Fight Gets Ugly For Users
Not even remotely the same thing. Of course you would get in trouble for making Internet Explorer Plus. However, these are users. They did not MAKE Whatsapp Plus. They merely used it. Some of them, perhaps most of them are unaware that they are not affiliated. The appropriate target is the creator of Whatsapp Plus. Targeting the user is detrimental to WhatsApp's cause.

Comment: Didn't hit "Send" yet (Score 2) 268

by tompaulco (#48892601) Attached to: Government Recommends Cars With Smarter Brakes

a third of 2013's police-reported car accidents were the rear-end crashes and a "large number" of the drivers either didn't apply the brakes at all (what?!)

That is because they didn't hit send yet. They were still staring at their phone and not concerned whatsoever with the innocents in the car with them, or the innocents in the car in front of them.
Another poster said that texters have worse response time than drunks. That is probably not true, because drunks at least have a response time. You can't respond to something when all of your sensory input is focused on something else. For texters, the response comes after the crash.
I have noticed a trend for years that rear end collisions have been getting more prevalent and the damage more severe. It was like people weren't even hitting the brakes. I blamed it on texting while driving. Now the statistics are saying the same thing.
However, I am NOT in favor of the new devices to apply the brakes when the driver doesn't. Automation in the cockpit will only lead to stupid people becoming MORE complacent in the car and will increase their irresponsible behaviors. Instead of looking up every other character to see what is going on, they will just stare continuously at their phone until they have finished their message.
Perhaps I could see having such a braking system if, after a single auto-braking incident, the car disabled itself except for low speed travel so it could pull over to the shoulder, and then, travel over 10 mph was disabled until the car was reset by a qualified driving instructor.

Comment: Re:its nothing new really. (Score 1) 789

by tompaulco (#48877883) Attached to: Fake Engine Noise Is the Auto Industry's Dirty Little Secret
The F-350 is a truck. Why on earth would anyone lust after a truck? It's only practical purpose is hauling stuff around and the ones that are built today are rarely, if ever, used for hauling anything other than groceries. They eat gas, they fit only two comfortably because the back is taken up by the huge bed which nobody ever puts anything in. They cost about as much as a small 3 bedroom house. Nope, can't see any reason to lust after that.

Comment: Re:HondaKarts? (Score 1, Insightful) 789

by tompaulco (#48877753) Attached to: Fake Engine Noise Is the Auto Industry's Dirty Little Secret
I would like to see proof that straight pipes by themselves do anything for the cars performance. The stock muffler provides a certain amount of back pressure and the engine is specifically tuned to work with this type of pressure. Eliminating this pressure is more likely to reduce rather than improve performance.
Of course every teenager with $100 thinks that a bolt on part (which fits all models of Honda, Nissan and Toyota!!!1!!ONE!!) is somehow going to improve the performance of the vehicle better than the hundreds of Japanese PhDs that designed the car.

Comment: Re:Gov't contractors are not paid by the hour (Score 1) 253

by tompaulco (#48877561) Attached to: IRS Warns of Downtime Risk As Congress Makes Cuts
That is the same as contracting anywhere, if you are an employee of the contracting house. You are paid salary and the company is still billed for hours you work over 40, you just don't get paid for it. That is why you don't be an employee of a contractor, you be a contractor. Or you find a contractor house that will pay you for all of your earned time. In that case, though, they will probably expect you to take some of the risk and not get paid when you don't have a contract.

Comment: Re:*Yawn* (Score 1) 144

by tompaulco (#48874587) Attached to: Doomsday Clock Could Move
Well, AC thinks they will scrap another minute because they are fear-mongering lefty scientists. If they add time, then he is wrong. But I would have to agree that if they take a minute out, then they are just fear mongering, or trying to make a political statement about the environment. In truth, nuclear devastation is a real threat to life as we know it and could happen in a matter of minutes. climate change is an affect to the climate which could take decades to have any noticeable affect, although we measure it daily. Not that the climate isn't important, but it doesn't justify changing the nuclear doomsday clock. Yes, it is the nuclear doomsday clock, and has been since 1947. The word "Climate: did not show up in the reasons behind adjusting the time until 2007, despite the fact that man had been affecting the climate since before the idea of the clock arose.
If they need to make a Climate change clock and set it to 100 years until Climate Change midnight, that is fine, but there is no reason to hijack another clock that already has a stated purpose.

Comment: Re:Who they do not attempt to stay relevant? (Score 1) 144

by tompaulco (#48874485) Attached to: Doomsday Clock Could Move
Well, you initially said "statistically", which is just wrong. Of the estimated 30 billion or so people that have died since Homo Sapiens became a species, 0 of them have died of an asteroid strike, so statistically, it is at the bottom of the list, along with sun going super nova, alien invasion, space herpes, moon colliding with Earth, giant space turtle stepping on Earth, Earth being swallowed by a black hole, etc.

Comment: Re:Wrong direction (Score 1) 217

The first amendment limits the government from limiting free speech. The first amendment does not guarantee that I, a private citizen, must pay for the infrastructure for the government to make a political statement, nor that I must sacrifice opportunity to listen to their spiel. There is nothing in the constitution protecting government speech to me.

Comment: Re:Simple solution .... (Score 1) 217

Give the receiver the option. You have received a call, please press 0 to accept this call for free or enter a dollar amount for which you would be willing to take this call. After this call is over, you have the option to remove the charge if , for example, it was your child calling stranded on the road from an unknown number.

Comment: Biting the hand that feeds you? (Score 1) 206

by tompaulco (#48838601) Attached to: 19,000 French Websites Hit By DDoS, Defaced In Wake of Terror Attacks
The French, like many European countries is more liberal than the United States, and as such, was very progressive about allowing Muslims into the country, letting them live and work and worship as they please. As a result of this kindness, they have been beset with increased crime, riots, bombings and now DDOS. 70% of prisoners in France are Muslims. Only 5 to 10% of the population is Muslim. It is pretty obvious that a strong correlation exists between the Muslims in France and the Blacks in the United States. The difference being that the Blacks were brought here against their will, but the Muslims were welcomed with open arms. Regardless, in both situations, the result has been the same effect. Incidentally, Blacks are not a significant crime issue in Europe. This seems to support that race does not necessarily make you more likely to commit a crime. In the U.S. race is an excuse.

"Being against torture ought to be sort of a bipartisan thing." -- Karl Lehenbauer

Working...