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Security

+ - Help Nmap by filling out the SecTools.org survey!->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Help Nmap and the security world in general by filling out the 2010 SecTools.org survey! Results from this survey help the security community discover new tools, improve old ones, and gives everyone a chance to have their say. Besides being a great venue to learn about lesser known tools, this survey has lead to many of the advanced Nmap features including the Nmap Scripting Engine (which currently has well over 100 user-contributed scripts), Ndiff for comparing scans, the Zenmap interface, and, my personal favourite, despite a lack of votes, a script to check the availability of California vanity plates. With the Summer of Code projects coming up fast, this is your chance to shape Nmap's future!"
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Comment: Re:Apply (Score 3, Insightful) 441

by thefear (#31650746) Attached to: Best Way To Land Entry-Level Job?

How are you showing them your skills? A resume? I've hired a few developers in my time, I assure you the only people that care about your resume is HR.

Agreed, that said, the OP lamented how he can't get an interview. Maybe he does need to improve his resume.

Regardless of everything I've said above, be it right or wrong, you have one serious disadvantage. You're looking for a job at the worst possible time.

I fervently disagree with this sentiment. I'm also a soon to graduate developer and have received offers from almost every company that I applied to.

Comment: Final 21% (Score 1) 224

by thefear (#31372600) Attached to: Web Copyright Crackdown On the Way

Offshore sites will not be immune from the crackdown, said Pitkow, because almost all of them depend on banner ads served by U.S.-based services. Because the DMCA requires the ad service to act against any violator, Attributor says it can interdict the revenue lifeline at any offending site in the world.

Attributor already has been engaged by several major book publishers to get unauthorized eBooks off unauthorized sites. "And we have 99% success rate," he said.

IBM

+ - IBM's DB2 runs Oracle applications, say what?-> 2

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Just in time for the imminent acquisition of Sun by Oracle it seems Big Blue has finally realized that it's in an all out war and they are going for the jugular.
Apparently making DB2 9.7 for Linux, Unix, and Windows understand PL/SQL and extending their own SQL to also
understand Oracle's dialect (down to the dreaded (+) join syntax!) last year was just the opening salvo.
According to an IBM developerWorks article by their SQL Architect those DB2 developers in Toronto have upped the ante and provided an OCI (Oracle Client Interface) compatible client. Makes one wonder: What's next?
Given the importance of Oracle's DBMS to their stream revenue, as compared to the relevance of
DB2 for LUW to IBM in the big picture, I wonder how much room to maneuver Oracle actually has if it comes to an all out pricing-war.
Has anyone tried the "Oracle compatibility features" of DB2 and is
considering a move or extension of an application?
Certainly what's offered is not sufficient to easily port all applications out there.
But for just how many of those apps will what's provided be good enough?
Are we seeing the end of the SQL dialect wars, vendor lock-in, and a commoditization the DBMS market?"

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OS X

Apple Says Booting OS X Makes an Unauthorized Copy 865

Posted by timothy
from the slice-the-ram-nodes-to-find-copy-four dept.
recoiledsnake writes "Groklaw has an extensive look at the latest developments in the Psystar vs. Apple story. There's a nice picture illustrating the accusation by Apple that Psystar makes three unauthorized copies of OS X. The most interesting, however, is the last copy. From Apple's brief: 'Finally, every time Psystar turns on any of the Psystar computers running Mac OS X, which it does before shipping each computer, Psystar necessarily makes a separate modified copy of Mac OS X in Random Access Memory, or RAM. This is the third unlawful copy.' Psystar's response: 'Copying a computer program into RAM as a result of installing and running that program is precisely the copying that Section 117 provides does not constitute copyright infringement for an owner of a computer program. As the Ninth Circuit explained, permitting copies like this was Section 117's purpose.' Is Apple seriously arguing that installing a third party program and booting OS X results in copyright infringement due to making a derivative work and an unauthorized copy?"

+ - Apple says booting OS X makes an unauthorized copy 9

Submitted by recoiledsnake
recoiledsnake (879048) writes "Groklaw has an extensive look at the latest developments in the Psystar vs. Apple story. There's a nice picture illustrating the accusation by Apple that Psystar makes three unauthorized copies of OS X. The most interesting however, is the last copy. From Apple's brief: "Finally, every time Psystar turns on any of the Psystar computers running Mac OS X, which it does before shipping each computer, Psystar necessarily makes a separate modified copy of Mac OS X in Random Access Memory, or RAM. This is the third unlawful copy." Psystar's response: "Copying a computer program into RAM as a result of installing and running that program is precisely the copying that Section 117 provides does not constitute copyright infringement for an owner of a computer program. As the Ninth Circuit explained, permitting copies like this was Section 117’s purpose." Is Apple seriously arguing that installing a third party program and booting OS X results in copyright infringement due to making a derivative work and an unauthorized copy?"

This is the theory that Jack built. This is the flaw that lay in the theory that Jack built. This is the palpable verbal haze that hid the flaw that lay in...

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