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Comment: Re:More Efficient (Score 2) 549

by teebob21 (#48037357) Attached to: Elon Musk: We Must Put a Million People On Mars To Safeguard Humanity

"Doctor, you mentioned the ratio of ten women to each man. Now, wouldn't that necessitate the abandonment of the so-called monogamous sexual relationship, I mean, as far as men were concerned?"

"Regrettably, yes. But it is, you know, a sacrifice required for the future of the human race. I hasten to add that since each man will be required to do prodigious...service along these lines, the women will have to be selected for their sexual characteristics which will have to be of a highly stimulating nature."

"I must confess, you have an astonishingly good idea there, Doctor."

Came to the comments for this. Was not disappointed.

Comment: Re:I don't get it. (Score 1) 144

It does read like an advertisement, but it is one that, as a parent, I want to read.

Oh, I agree...I should have put some more positive spin on that assessment. I have nothing against vehicle owners installing GPS in said vehicles being used by others. It's paid the bills for me in the past.

Hell, I even let them Big Brother on my car. Progressive Insurance customer here: I gladly signed up for Snapshot when it was available (and drove like a little old lady) for 45 days. Saved a permanent 14% on my annual premium without permanent monitoring.

Is this news because it's LoJack, a household name dating back to my childhood, rather than Wireless Matrix/GPS Insight/Trimble/the 47 other players in this space?

Comment: I don't get it. (Score 2) 144

Why is this news? Is it just the consumer commoditization of what businesses have been doing for years? Vehicles + GPS + Web Interface = Big Brother? Whoopee.

I've been supporting deployments of vehicle GPS, geofences, and automatic alerts for years. Maybe that why this article is so underwhelming.

Also, it reads like an advertisement.

Comment: Re:Personally (Score 1) 655

This! Thisthisthisthisthis. Oh man, you just made a friend in me. I was recently told by an industrial engineer here where I work that it was "more important to be a team player and get the general concepts of the integration working before we worry about the details". This is the guy who also has a Master's of Business Administration, but is unable to correctly spell "MBA". Of course, this strategic-level million-dollar project is 14 months late and has had over 22,000 defects logged.

I wonder why.

Comment: Re:Short answers, more like guidelines (Score 1) 103

by teebob21 (#33070786) Attached to: NASA's Top 10 Space Junk Missions

Parent was correct: same delta-v for differing masses. However, since delta-v is nothing more sophisticated than good ol' acceleration (Force x Mass), you do need more force for a greater mass to reach a given delta-v.

My question was along the lines of inducing acceleration in very low mass particles using the principles seen in a Crookes radiometer. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crookes_radiometer Possible?

Comment: Questions questions questions (Score 4, Interesting) 103

by teebob21 (#33069414) Attached to: NASA's Top 10 Space Junk Missions

For the sake of discussion, let's assume this report showed a problem orders of magnitude worse, and we were on the verge of Kessler syndrome conditions. What technologies exist today to combat the problem? (Yes, I know, no government today would unilaterally scrub space without a quid pro quo...)

If there are 19,000 trackable chunks of debris, how many untrackable (and just as deadly) small particles are there? I know that particle densities are minute. If we launched an array of satellites with Aerogel paneling, is it reasonable to expect a significant improvement in "air" quality up there?

What about that heat-ray device recently pulled our of Afghanistan? Can we launch one of those to spray microwaves tangentially to the Earth's surface? Would the heat applied to a paint-chip sized debris particle be enough to change the orbit? It doesn't take too much delta-v to alter the eccentricity of a paint fleck enough to burn up in orbit, does it?

(Less coffee, more sleep next time, methinks)

Comment: Red light Cameras != Speed Cameras (Score 1) 567

by teebob21 (#33061842) Attached to: Tennessee Town Releases Red Light Camera Stats

I live in Phoenix, AZ where speed cameras were recently deactivated after two years of controversy. The same vendor, Redflex, was snapping pictures if you were driving 11+ mph over the limit.

However, Tempe and Scottsdale still have red-light cameras. I have no issue with red-light cameras, so long as common sense is used when reviewing tickets. TFA:

Although most were still violations of state law, they were considered very close calls or were due to such reasons as vehicles stopping a short distance over the stop bar that did not pose a traffic hazard, vehicles moving out of the way of an emergency vehicle, plates that were unidentifiable and weather related issues.

Speeders going 11-over when the rest of traffic drives 8-over aren't a public safety risk; red-light runners coming perpendicular to broadside traffic and kids in crosswalks are.

Sounds like a sudden outbreak of common sense. Ticket those red-light runners. I paid my ticket for getting there after the yellow; fair and square.

"Life, loathe it or ignore it, you can't like it." -- Marvin the paranoid android

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