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Comment More revenue for companies (Score 2) 283 283

I understand the reason that people might want to consider this, but on the other side of the fence is a company that will benefit from all that extra cash from new customers who could not otherwise afford the service. What will the company who benefits do in return for all this extra revenue coming from tax dollars? If the answer is "nothing" then I'd be in favor of dropping the idea.

Comment Re:Lemme ask you this ... (Score 1) 500 500

I sincerely hope that it all implodes an these provisions are left expired. Barring that, Mitch McConnell just introduced a measure that would remove one of the less evil portions that prevent further use of "secret interpretations" like we saw with section 215. Either he's trying to poison it, or he's just a complete asshole bordering on enemy of the state.

Comment Re:It's much more complicated than this... (Score 1) 825 825

Highest *marginal* tax rates...not only that, but a signification percentage of companies (especially the largest ones) pay only a small fraction of that due to subsidies, tax breaks, and other perks that the average citizen does not get. This is nothing more than a talking point with zero substance.

Comment Re:Good (Score 2) 108 108

I personally think you've missed the point. The point is that the cops shouldn't tagging *anyone* unless they are currently under investigation. If the cops happen to get a false hit, that data should be expunged *immediately* - immediately in the sense that they never even get to see it, because there is no reason they need it.

Comment Re:Same lie, two people, different outcome (Score 1) 560 560

This is absolutely a plausible scenario. Just because someone has an encrypted partition (or two, or three, etc), does not, without exception, mean that these partitions are accessible. A forgotten key is not beyond the scope of reasonableness.

Comment Re:A number of countries?? Say it ain't so! (Score 1) 73 73

Actually, I'm not so sure this is related to searching so much as the Third-Party Doctrine, which was created by the Supreme Court as part of a ruling in a drug case. It needs to be abolished. There is practically little we can do in our day-to-day lives that does not require interaction with a third party, and this will almost always leave some kind of data trail. Third party or not, the government should have no access to this information, and no reason to acquire it, unless a person is a legitimate suspect in an ongoing investigation.

Comment Re:Free To Do What We Tell You (Score 2) 274 274

> We have no representation in congress,

That is our own fault. As long as we continue treating candidates like items on a fast food menu, nothing will change. Voters need to get involved during the primaries, and select and support candidates who are not there to perpetuate the status quo. Business as usual is *all* you're going to get from seasoned, incumbent, and party-endorsed candidates, especially those on the national level.

Comment Re:No expectation of privacy (Score 1) 405 405

> A police officer

Bingo. The fact that an actual human resource was required in order for this happen made it so that police departments *had* to be extremely judicious with how they allocated these resources. These built-in constraints forced departments into to maintaining a lawful and constitutional approach to searching. This is the same standard that *ought* to be applied to new technology - merely being able to accomplish the same thing much faster does not in any way diminish constitutional relevance.

Comment Licensing? (Score 1) 44 44

Why should the government be licensing anything (the NSA no less)? It is not a commercial enterprise. Furthermore, it seems like the "technologies" at stake would be those that facilitate the kinds of illegal and unconstitutional activities that have been going on, unchecked, until Snowden exposed them.

Comment Re:Normalization of the Police State (Score 1) 117 117

Are we really that completely helpless? All of this was perpetrated by, and maintained by *congress*. It can easily be fixed by congress. Little will change, however, if we do not step up and hold our elected representatives accountable, by first and foremost, ensuring that the *right* people are serving in office. And by "serving" I do not mean "self-serving," which seems to be standard fare these days.

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