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Comment: Re:471 million? You may want to think about that. (Score 1) 171

by metlin (#49756021) Attached to: California Votes To Ban Microbeads

471 million potatos is a lot of potatos.
471 million .2mm bits of plastic is enough to cover in plastic all of the living rooms in California.
Wait - no - one living room. Or about a dinner-plates worth a day.

Every day. That's the difference.

Even assuming that it's a dinner plate sized amount of pollution, over two decades, you are looking at 7300 dinner plates. Only, broken into little chunks, easily consumed by aquatic life and smothering plants, clogging pipes etc.

Comment: Re:Millennials will have a very rough landing (Score 1) 405

by metlin (#49650953) Attached to: Is IT Work Getting More Stressful, Or Is It the Millennials?

What rubbish. Plenty of cultures have parents who are involved in their children's education. My own parents were extremely involved, and as the only child, they put a lot of time and effort into my education and extracurricular activities. To this day, they are quite interested in my career, and are just as involved in teaching my own year old language and music.

That is not a statement on their children's capabilities. Tiger moms are common, and it just demonstrates responsible parents who are genuinely interested in their kids' well being.

My wife and I will certainly be taking an interest in our kids' education and lives, and that is not being overprotective -- that is good parenting.

Comment: Re:WTF (Score 1) 225

by metlin (#49639973) Attached to: NFL Releases Deflategate Report

Some of the greatest minds have been interested in seemingly trivial and popular problems (e.g., Richard Feynman).

This is about science and engineering, and whether or not a phenomena can occur, and it's about public's reaction to something that was proven scientifically.

Plus, a lot of Slashdot's readers are American, and some of us are geeks who like -- wait for this -- football!

Comment: Re:Predictable (Score 4, Informative) 176

He doesn't seem overweight for me.

While I feel for the family, to say that he is not overweight shows just how much society's perception of being overweight has changed.

Take a look at this picture, for instance.

And take a look at the body fat visual chart for comparison.

With the overhanging belly, he is easily 35-40% at least. While the majority of people today are fat (especially in the US), that is not healthy. If anything, until recently, 20-25% used to be average.

Above 25-30% is the fat territory, and that's when you start increasing your risk for heart attacks, diabetes, and strokes. Mr. Goldberg may have had a lot of things going for him, but he is most certainly more than a little overweight.

Assuming he's ~6 feet, I would argue that he is probably ~30-40+ lbs overweight. That is not at all healthy. I'm not arguing everyone should have abs, but there's a happy medium here. Mr. Goldberg is very clearly on the unfortunate side of the medium.

Comment: Floating-yet-submerged pipeline? (Score 1) 678

Hmm... How about a floating-yet-submerged pipeline?

Water flowing through plastic tubes anchored offshore ... (still submerged mind you - but not laying the seabed).

It could start small -- say two 12 inch pipes, then more, or larger, pipelines added once the concept was proved.

Why does this work? For one thing, eminent-domain, right-of-way issues pretty much go away. And the problem of structural support turns into keeping pipeline sections from _rising_, rather than falling (caused by the natural bouyancy of the pipeline and its contents)

Comment: Re:*Grabs a bowl of popcorn* (Score 4, Insightful) 385

by metlin (#49501129) Attached to: Can High Intelligence Be a Burden Rather Than a Boon?

You can get a buff body with a reasonable workout regimen in less than a year, and many elements of your "looks" can easily be fixed (better hair, wearing contacts, getting teeth fixed, dressing more stylishly).

If you have game, then your dick size doesn't matter, because history is rife with examples of men with questionable looks and stunning women.

Ultimately, having good social skills is much more important than any of those things in getting laid.

Comment: Article is false. (Score 1) 320

by sonamchauhan (#49499451) Attached to: Columbia University Doctors Ask For Dr. Mehmet Oz's Dismissal

First of all none of the signatories are from Columbia university (i.e. none of the signatories are his colleagues)

Secondly, many of the 'distinguished' signatories are in cahoots with the GMO industry -- including one that was earlier a shill for the tobacco industry. See this post for details: http://science.slashdot.org/co...

You may not like Dr. Oz, but beware - this enemy of your enemy is not your friend.

Comment: Re:They're called trees. (Score 1) 128

Haha - you can't see the wood for the trees! (this idiom has a double meaning here)

See the tree? The wood is almost all 'fixed' carbon.

And when it dies, a tree doesn't go 'poof' in a cloud of CO2. Instead, organic matter gets trapped in the ground and new topsoil is created (again, mostly carbon).

Recall a well tended urban 'nature strip' in an older suburb (a century or more)? Typically, the strip tends to 'pops out' from its concrete lining. That's a small version of the same effect.

Some interesting info I just came across: http://managingwholes.com/new-...

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