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Comment Re:last chance to buy quality Sharp products (Score -1, Flamebait) 46

None. Sadly, idiots like that run around screaming about Obama and how O is going to take their guns/rights.
These are the same kind of idiots that back police for killing a kid in the street for being black, but has no issues when a bunch of mental right wing nut jobs take over gov. buildings in a terrorists action, they will back it.

Comment Re:That guy looks and sounds like a pompous ass (Score 1) 70

Really? Every single person makes judgements by personality traits alone (or at least primarily?)

I certainly don't. Such considerations aren't just pointless, they are wrong. Considering how politics is going, you can see the skillful liar and charmer scamming millions of people because he had a "better personality" than a better man, who wasn't quite as charming. So we miss out on someone who might be a good person in favor of a charming sociopath. All because of "personality".

How is that working out?

Comment Re:That guy looks and sounds like a pompous ass (Score 2) 70

People who view others simply by personality traits are missing out. Yeah, so the guy talks like an arrogant twat, is he wrong?

You see, your attacking him on something completely irrelevant, simply because it is easier than to actually discuss the merits of what he was saying.

Keep in mind, he may be brilliant or he may be a complete loon, I am not judging either here, just your rebuttal, which amounts to "Big Fat Ugly ... do not like", which actually makes you exactly who hate the most, an arrogant twat. ;)

Comment A few considerations: (Score 1) 397

In Apple's defense, it does seem reasonably plausible that the biometric sensor widget built into the 'home' button(and quite possibly the cable connecting the home button to the logic board) is a 'trusted' element of the system, in the 'the integrity of the system depends on this part performing as expected and not being malicious' sense of 'trusted'. So, I can see why it would be impossible or prohibitively difficult to keep the biometric authentication feature secure while also allowing random people to swap random hardware in to that part of the system.

However, what is a lot less clear is why(especially when many iDevices, including current-model ones, simply lack this feature entirely) 'security' demands that the entire phone be bricked, rather than just the biometric features flushing any private storage associated with them and leaving the phone usable as though it were a model without that feature. This might involve wiping all locally stored data, if the device encryption keys are tangled up with the biometric authentication feature's private storage; but it should still be able to function as though you had just restored it to defaults.

This also raises the question of whether, with the correct incentives, it is possible to induce authorized repair services to introduce malicious components when doing these repairs, and whether doing so would allow you to extract highly sensitive information. Since Apple-blessed repairs can apparently fix home buttons without destroying the handset, and since Apple's line is that tampering threatens the integrity of the authentication system, this seems like a natural place to try to get your malicious part introduced: much more likely that an authorized repair outfit exists in your jurisdiction than that Apple Inc. does; many more low-level techs you could potentially lean on; and home button repairs are a pretty common service request...

Comment Re:Context On the Issue (Score 5, Informative) 397

Apple's response, by way of MacRumors:

An Apple spokeswoman commented on the issue, referring to protective security features intended to prevent "malicious" third-party components from potentially compromising a user's iPhone as the main reason for the "error 53" message.

We protect fingerprint data using a secure enclave, which is uniquely paired to the touch ID sensor. When iPhone is serviced by an authorised Apple service provider or Apple retail store for changes that affect the touch ID sensor, the pairing is re-validated. This check ensures the device and the iOS features related to touch ID remain secure. Without this unique pairing, a malicious touch ID sensor could be substituted, thereby gaining access to the secure enclave. When iOS detects that the pairing fails, touch ID, including Apple Pay, is disabled so the device remains secure.”

She adds: “When an iPhone is serviced by an unauthorized repair provider, faulty screens or other invalid components that affect the touch ID sensor could cause the check to fail if the pairing cannot be validated. With a subsequent update or restore, additional security checks result in an ‘error 53’ being displayed If a customer encounters an unrecoverable error 53, we recommend contacting Apple support.

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