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Comment Time to put on the tin foil hats (Score 1) 76

Actually, aluminum foil shields, wrapped around the parts of your Wi-Fi router that face outside your house (e.g. not blocking signals to the rest of the house), will give you a much cleaner signal, and prevent a lot of this interference. Also keep the wi-fi away from windows, where this kind of interception of signal occurs.

If it looks strange, just take a cardboard box, cut it in parts that shield the same areas, and apply aluminum foil to those. Add pipe cleaners for a decorative touch.

There, problem solved.

Submission Dear FCC : Please don't kill my PC!->

An anonymous reader writes: This past year the FCC passed a set of rules that require manufacturers to thwart end-users from violating rules intended to keep the airwaves usable by all. Unfortunately the rules are such that they will do nothing to stop violators who have the knowledge and intent to bypass them and are already having massive collateral damage on non-violating users. Many people in the OpenWRT and LibreCMC communities are already seeing these locks in newer stock firmware images.

What we would like people to keep in mind is that these rules are not explicit to routers and will hamper other devices as well. Can't install your favourite distribution on a new computer? These rules may be to blame.

The EFF, FSF, Purple Foundation, OpenWRT, ThinkPenguin, Qualcomm, and others have been working diligently to stop this, but we need your help. This is your last chance to send in comments for a set of proposed rules that will make the situation even worse than it already is. For accurate information (there have been many factually inaccurate and misleading stories/quotes) check out the following blog post: and send your comments into the FCC via the EFF's new site: Also see

This is your last chance to stop this. The comment period ends October 9th!

Additional thoughts: Canada and Europe are also passing a similar set of rules. This fight won't be over any time soon. However we won't win unless we can overcome and win the first battle: stopping the proposed rules in the USA.

Link to Original Source

Submission Porsche chooses Apple over Google because Google wants too much data->

countach44 writes: As reported in number 5 of this list from Motor Trend, Porsche went with Apple over Google for the infotainment system in its new 911. Apparently, Android Auto wants vehicle data (throttle position, speed, coolant temp, etc...) whereas Apple Play only needs to know if the car is in motion. Speculation is around what Google, as a company building its own car, wants that data for.
Link to Original Source

Submission Europe's highest court just rejected the US's 'safe harbor' agreement->

craigtp writes: The European Court of Justice has just ruled that the transatlantic Safe Harbour agreement, which lets American companies use a single standard for consumer privacy and data storage in both the US and Europe, is invalid.

The ruling came after Edward Snowden's NSA leaks showed that European data stored by US companies was not safe from surveillance that would be illegal in Europe.

This ruling could have profound effects on all US based companies, not just tech companies, that rely upon the "safe harbor" agreement to allow them to store their European customers' data in the US.

Under this new ruling, they could effectively be forced to store European customers' data in Europe and then have to follow 20 or more different sets of national data privacy regulations.

Link to Original Source

Submission EU Court Invalidates Europe-US Safe Harbour Data Sharing Agreement

Mickeycaskill writes: The top court of the European Union on Tuesday has suspended an agreement that has allowed data-sharing between the EU and the US for the past 15 years, following months of increased tensions over spying and the protection of personal data.

The ruling was the court’s final decision in a data-protection case brought by 27-year-old Austrian law student Max Schrems against the Irish data protection commissioner. Schrems was concerned his data on Facebook could be shared with US intelligence.

The court declared that Safe Harbour deal was “invalid” as it takes data on European citizens outside the protection of European authorities. The deal was originally intended to facilitate data-transfers to the US, a country whose data-protection regime is less stringent than that of the EU.

Safe Harbour has been enforced since 2000, but has been reviewed since 2013 following Edward Snowden's relevations about mass surveillance. A new agreement on a new deal is thought to be close, but the invalidation of the current agreement, in place since 2000, is likely to create difficulties for many trans-Atlantic companies in the short term.

Comment Disrespect goes both ways (Score 1) 788

My current work on userspace graphics enabling may require me to send an occasional quirks kernel patch, but I know I will spend at least a day dreading the potential toxic background radiation of interacting with the kernel community before I send anything

My wife and I did some extensive work to learn how to avoid expressing disrespect to each other.

One day I complained to her that she'd made me swim in a sea of toxic disrespectful judgments all day.

What I learned from the professionals was that using hyperbolic labels like "toxic" is also disrespectful. It's better to just stick to noting that you felt disrespected by a particular statement or statements until the message gets across - assuming the other side is working on learning to avoid disrespect. If they aren't, you identify the disrespect for them, notify them you aren't going to tolerate it any more, and then enforce boundaries to make sure you aren't subjected to it any more.

Another thing I learned is that people who are in an abusive relationship (including disrespect) tend to become abusers themselves.

Submission Humans Are More Toxic to Wildlife than Chernobyl->

derekmead writes: The Chernobyl disaster remains the worst nuclear accident in human history, with a death toll that is difficult to tally even decades later. Given the sobering reach of the resulting radiation contamination, you might expect the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone—the 4,200 square kilometers in the immediate vicinity of the explosion—to have suffered serious long-term ecological damage.

Surprisingly, though, a study published today in Current Biology shows that wildlife in the exclusion zone is actually more abundant than it was before the disaster. According to the authors, led by Portsmouth University professor of environmental science Jim Smith, the recovery is due to the removal of the single biggest pressure on wildlife—humans.

Link to Original Source

Comment Re:Canada has already rejected it (Score 1) 261

Wrong. CPC acts for their Communist masters in China, not for Canada.

I see you have never grown up in Canada, and believe the non-translateable labels of "socialist" "communist" etc. Parties, other than the Greens, don't really translate to US versions. For example, in BC the Liberals are the most conservative party, and are run by the right of center Social Credit Party remnants.

I went to school (Capilano University, SFU, etc) with these people.

"You show me an American who can keep his mouth shut and I'll eat him." -- Newspaperman from Frank Capra's _Meet_John_Doe_