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Comment: Re:Bingo! (Score 1) 767

by DaveAtFraud (#47762023) Attached to: Choose Your Side On the Linux Divide

... I come down on the systemd side when I want my laptop to correctly connect to the appropriate WiFi network (but only if not connected to a wired network).

The NetworkManager is written by literally the same people who work on the SystemD.

If it hadn't worked before, why you think it would work afterwards?

It works better than the alternative for managing dynamic network connections. That isn't saying much since the alternative is doing it manually or with handcrafted shell scripts.

I usually call it NetworkMangler.

Cheers,
Dave

Comment: Re:The far reaches (Score 1) 767

by ThePhilips (#47755399) Attached to: Choose Your Side On the Linux Divide

I'm clearly a beardy type despite cutting my teeth on Unix well after 1988. Apparently I did get the message where so many others did not.

I started seriously with Linux in 1999, after 5 years of WinNT4. And I do not like the systemd.

SystemD is a reinvention of Windows for Linux. It's even made the same way as the Windows: modular design with monolitic architecture. Just like a card house: pull one card, and the whole thing comes down.

That's why Linux back then was like a breath of fresh air to me. Coming from NT4 (which was hard to keep working) to Linux (which I could bring back from a fatal failure in under 15 minutes) pretty much exemplified to me how *NOT* to design the software.

SystemD is indeed the "second system effect" which (unknowingly?) implements many errors of the Windows. The errors which still hunt MS to this day!. (E.g. all embedded Windows attempts failed. Now they have a dedicated embedded system - WinPho - because porting the "card house" to another device built around different paradigms is hard and costly and error prone. It works like crap in the end, while providing no benefits to developers (making portable applications proved to be futile; with WinPho MS stopped promising it) and consequently users.)

Comment: Re:NT is best (Score 1) 187

by ThePhilips (#47755053) Attached to: Munich Council Say Talk of LiMux Demise Is Greatly Exaggerated

Not so rare if (A) you have full assortment of the .Net run-times installed and (B) skip some monthly update.

At the worst, on my Win7 I had about 5 .Net run-times installed. It happened more than once that after one dot-point update, there was another dot-point update immediately available.

(Plus, there were two "uninstallable" .net updates: they would silently fail to install and after reboot you would be asked to update again to the same version. I see that shit because I have auto-updates disabled. But for normal people with auto-updates on, that would be a prompt to reboot ~30 min after previous reboot.)

The only solution is to uninstall the application which requires the uncommon .net version and uninstall the redundant .net run-times.

Comment: Re:NT is best (Score 1) 187

by ThePhilips (#47755031) Attached to: Munich Council Say Talk of LiMux Demise Is Greatly Exaggerated

On Debian based systems this was never a problem.

Debian IIRC would ask you ~3 times (displaying big scary warnings that you better know what you are doing and Debian isn't responsible for the consequences of your actions) before it would let you uninstall a core OS package like glibc or text-tools or perl.

That is also reason why Debian rebuilds the initrd so often, seemingly redundantly, during the update. To make sure that even if system went down during the update, and there are updated kernel modules, chances are great that your system would remain in a bootable state.

The traditional problems of the RedHat systems where RPM lets you screw your system (or screws it on its own automatically; or refuses to do a trivial thing, you force it and it conveniently screws it for you) at least to me are long over.

Comment: Bingo! (Score 1) 767

by DaveAtFraud (#47754233) Attached to: Choose Your Side On the Linux Divide

I was looking for an appropriate thread to make the same suggestion. I come down on the side of the sysvinit people when it comes to servers and other stable installations. OTH, I come down on the systemd side when I want my laptop to correctly connect to the appropriate WiFi network (but only if not connected to a wired network). It really makes sense to support both. Stability, reliability and simplicity for the server folks and something more flexible for desktops and laptops.

Cheers,
Dave

Comment: Re:Why gravity is treated as a force? (Score 1) 97

What about mirror neurons? The brain can act on the story, producing an effect that feels the same as actually dropping a ball on your foot.

Take a placebo for asthma, then actually take asthma. Studies show that the perceived effect is the same. Thus, if you believe in it enough, your brain can fool you into believing any model.

Next program those models in holodecks, and you can actually experience a ball falling on your foot, when you're only "reading" a holonovel.

Comment: Re:Pick a different job. (Score 3, Informative) 548

Programmers are smart enough not to unionise, which allows newcomers into the field without these insane artificial barriers of entry.

Unions are barriers to entry into the field to any newcomers, unions are also horrific from point of view of price setting and prevent people who actually excel in the job from making significantly more than those who only coast by. Your complaint is a complaint of somebody who shouldn't have become a programmer in the first place, but also it is a complaint of a horrible person, who wants to prevent others from entering the field freely.

People shouldn't be licensed just to try and make a living, all professional government dictated licenses and participation in various organizations are a huge economic mistake but more importantly they are a huge impediment to individual freedoms.

The biggest mistake you can make is to believe that you are working for someone else.

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