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Comment Re:Some people don't get it either (Score 1) 76

If you said that aloud, it would probably be, based on your tone and body language, clearly sarcasm. When it's in written form, though, you are mistaken--it is NOT clear. If, for example, this was being said by Rush Limbaugh, it would obviously be a tongue-in-cheek reference to Trump, but otherwise straight communication.

Speaking as someone who overuses sarcasm, I've found that no matter how clear *I* think I am being, others do not always see it that way.

Comment Re:No global deletion (Score 1) 82

Remind me again who is having their free speech silenced by this

Google. And in practice, the people who rely on it to have their content be found (i.e. everyone else).

3. Why does Google have free speech rights that normal companies don't, e.g. credit references can't report things that happened long ago by law, and can't claim free speech allows them to.

Maybe those companies should? The solution to "some idiots excessively weight events that happened 20 years ago" is not censorship of facts, it's to educate people that other people change and that needs to be taken into account.

Comment Re:Troll them! (Score 1) 141

I wish Lenny had more to say before he starts repeating himself. I bet he could keep most of them on the line a lot longer ;)

The ducks are priceless, I love the diversion strategy. A lot of Lenny's stuff works because it can be interpreted as appropriate answers to a wide variety of questions. Like his "Good, yes yes..." can be seen as responding to a question about how he's doing, agreeing to a yes/no question, or simply being polite.

It seems that usually Lenny fails when people start trying to get numbers out of him ("how much are you willing to spend?", "how much can you donate", "what's your credit card number", "what's your address?", etc) It'd be nice if Lenny had a way to inject some numbers into the conversation (fairly late in the conversation, after he's done his "world finances" speech), without his response only being applicable to questions about numbers. For example, maybe he could have a barely audible conversation with someone family member in the house, wherein Lenny sounds like he's referring to the phone call and trying to gather information, then starts repeating some numbers ("thirty-two.... oh.... oh?... but the... (mumble mumble...)", then goes inaudible again, and ultimately the person leaves the house thus making them conveniently unavailable for followup. Lenny then returns to the conversation on the phone with some meaningless mumbling or platitutdes, leaving the caller to interpret the numbers that he heard as either the start of the numbers he was asking for (or the whole thing), or contrarily (if he wasn't seeking numbers) a side conversation that has nothing to do with him. Lenny's next response should start off with "yes, yes...."

The caller would surely follow up trying to get more information / the rest of the information that they were seeking, so Lenny's next line could operate on that assumption. Maybe have one of his rambling stories at that point, and then after that he forgets what it was he was saying the person on the line... maybe eventually calls up the family member on a cell phone to get the needed information, getting another mumbly conversation, ending with the family member brushing him off and telling him that they don't have time, that he should talk with (other family member). Giving Lenny an opportunity for more delays and brushoff tactics, plus plenty of apologetic "I hope you're not upset with this old man for taking so much time..." type responses... maybe him having trouble with his cell phone (perhaps even trying to get the operator to offer tech support advice? ;) ), ending with him giving up and having to go dig through files (that could take AGES).... I bet they could go from record conversations in the half-hour range to average conversations in the same range. ;)

Comment Re:Too bad they pushed Love out (Score 4, Interesting) 197

SYS V needs to go open next, not that overloaded slowlaris, but lean mean SYS V

I was under the impression that the entire POINT of SYS V was for the major UNIX vendors to re-implement the guts of Unix as a clearly, enforceably, proprietary product (after the CONTU recommendations and the resulting copyright law changes explicitly extended copyright to software), then move to it and orphan the original development thread. (This might make opening it a hard sell to the members of the consortium.)

There were at least a couple issues with the proprietary status of the AT&T code:

One issue was that AT&T was still a government-regulated utility monopoly and there were some requirements about disclosing and releasing non-telephone-related inventions they came up with.

The big issue was that, before copyright applied and before software patents were hacked up (by recasting software as one embodiment of, or a component of, a patentable machine or process), the only protection was trade secret and the related contract law. Trade secrets generally stop being enforceable when the secret out of the bag (with some details about whether the claimant contributed to the leak). Bell Labs had shipped code to a LOT of educational institutions. When the U of New South Wales used the System 6 kernel code and an explanation of it as the two-volume text for an Operating System class, the textbooks became an underground classic. This, along with AT&T's benign-neglect licensing policies, led to the burst of little, cheap, generic UNIX boxes, as this was also when microcomputer chips were just becoming powerful enough to do the job.

Up to then a big barrier to entry was that every new machine needed a custom O.S. to deploy, and these were enormous, machine specific, and mostly in assembler. That made it an expensive, undertaking, suitable only for financial giants. But all but under 2,000 lines of Unix was in C, and the entire kernel, which included essentially all the platform-specific code as a subset, was well under 10,000 lines of code. If you had a C compiler and assembler for your new machine, it was a matter of a few man-months to port it and get it up and running. Essentially ALL the utilities and applications came right over. You didn't have to train users, either, because they all worked pretty much just like what they'd used in college.

The game was:
1. Grab a bootleg copy of the code.
2. Port it to your machine and get it working.
3. Go to AT&T and ask for a license "to port Unix to our new machine and sell it."
4. AT&T, as a matter of policy, completely ignores any "violations" you may have committed during the porting phase and cuts you a license at a very reasonable price.
5. You "port Unix in an AMAZINGLY short time" (like the ten minutes it takes to tell Sales to go to market) and you're in business.
6. You (with your new business) and AT&T (with their small cut) slap each other on the back and laugh all the way to the bank. PROFIT! for you. (profit) for AT&T.
7. Because of the policy in 4., everybody ELSE manearly everbody's king a new machine knows they can do the same thing. So many do. AT&T gets a rakeoff from ALL of them. PROFIT! for AT&T. Far more than if they went dog-in-the-manger, held up the first few for all the traffic would bear, and got no more customers for Unix.

And because of this, it was in nearly everbody's interest to NOT challenge the AT&T-proprietary status of Unix. And it stayed this way until SCO's management screwed up and altered step 4. (Even then the case turned on other issues, so it never did come to the point of attacking AT&T's claim that Unix code was proprietary.)

Comment Re:Why only trees? (Score 1) 73

piezo generators have less than a percent of efficiency is why.

I thought it was closer to 80%, at least theoretically. Can you give me a reference for that "Less than 1%" number?

Whether this maps into anything like that number in a practical device for converting "found" mechanical power - such as tree sway or vibrations - is another matter entirely.

Comment Can this be co-installed with the stock version? (Score 1) 169

Can this be co-installed with the current version (for instance, 4.8.2.8 on Ubuntu 14.04 LTS, the latest Long Term Support Ubuntu release)?

Or do you have collisions which require you to purge the old one in order to try the new one, or which cause foulups if you don't?

(Honest question. I've seen a lot of that kind of thing with other projects. So now I'm a bit shy of trying the latest-and-greatest release of any tool on the production machines I depend on for time-critical work.)

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