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Comment: Re:Full benefits & Full responsibility (Score 1) 210

by dbIII (#49383783) Attached to: Nation's Biggest Nuclear Firm Makes a Play For Carbon Credit Cash
Wow - some of those U-238 numbers are two orders of magnitude higher than I've ever seen.
Still, it's a bottom ash situation because it's going to be heavy and not going to be reduced in the boiler. As others pointed out that ash still has to go somewhere even if it's not actually going up the stack, so it's not something that can be ignored.

Comment: Neither side wants to win (Score 1) 152

by Andy_R (#49378865) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Who's Going To Win the Malware Arms Race?

Virus and antivirus suppliers have a symbiotic business relationship, each requires the other to continually make slow progress, rendering their old product useless, so they can sell their new product. If either side 'won', then they would cease being able to sell upgrades, their business model requires then not to win.

Comment: Re:The future is now. (Score 4, Insightful) 152

by fuzzyfuzzyfungus (#49377967) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Who's Going To Win the Malware Arms Race?
And, unfortunately, ChromeOS is the comparatively softcore version of dystopian cryptographic lockdown. A ChromeOS device certainly works most smoothly if you leave it set to factory defaults, and generally play like a good little consumer; but, at least for now, there's a deliberate, documented, we-don't-assure-that-you'll-like-the-results-but-here's-how-to-do-it, switch for turning off the verification, becoming root, booting alternate payloads, and generally mucking around. My memory of the details is a little fuzzy; but I think that you can have your merry way with everything except some 'fallback' BIOS/bootloader that is hardware write-locked at the factory and isn't even modified by Google-provided updates; but instead intended to be just enough bootloader to un-brick basically anything you can do to the system in software. On some models, you can futz with that as well if you poke the right area of the board.

It's definitely a 'crypto lockdown to make security easier, and possibly even possible' device; and Google hardly encourages you to go forth and GNU; but they at least allow you to. That puts ChromeOS devices well above all iDevices, a fair percentage of Android hardware, and potentially above some 'trusted boot' UEFI systems(depending on whether you can re-key the system or not). It's certainly a good example; but it's far less of an anomaly than one would like.

Comment: Re:More of the same (Score 5, Insightful) 152

by fuzzyfuzzyfungus (#49377813) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Who's Going To Win the Malware Arms Race?
I'd be inclined to suggest that it will be worse than that:

Barring some sort of radical change in priorities that causes the market to accept zero new features for, oh, a (human) generation or more, while vendors put out bugfix releases, 'winning' certainly isn't going to happen by doing conventional stuff; but harder.

If 'winning' in fact occurs, odds are excellent that it will be on some wonderfully dystopian lockdown platform that shrinks the problem space considerably by forbidding basically everything that hasn't been cryptopgraphically blessed by the vendor, sandboxed to hell and back, or both. Naturally, the power afforded to the vendor in this scenario will never be abused.

Comment: Re:Full benefits & Full responsibility (Score 1) 210

by dbIII (#49377451) Attached to: Nation's Biggest Nuclear Firm Makes a Play For Carbon Credit Cash

When burnt, between 1% and 10% of the ash escapes the scrubbers

Citation required.
Other bits may be fair enough, if incredibly unlikely, I'll check later (since you haven't linked you table2, I'll assume by mistake not misdirection, I'll have to do a bit of digging won't I to find your source info?), but you've got a key assumption that completely ignores how devices designed to remove gas (their entire purpose is to remove NOx and SOx) deal with solid material.
That very unlikely number you've found may be true for the material in the bottom ash or even in the ash dam, but it's a very wild claim that it's coming out the stack.
We've had the technology to detect heavy metals in the flue gas for a century+ (spectroscopy) but nobody has seen any yet.

Comment: Re:Let's see (Score 1) 431

by Stephan Schulz (#49373181) Attached to: Experts: Aim of 2 Degrees Climate Goal Insufficient

I am sorry what is it about ice being melted by volcanoes escaped your notice ?

You mean the section that says "It is important to note that none of this research suggests that global warming and climate change are not affecting the ice sheets of Antarctica but they do imply that any melting due to global warming is being exacerbated by geothermal heating from beneath the ice cap"? Yes, I read that. I also read that "A survey of the thickness of the Earth's crust in Antarctica found a particularly thin zone under Marie Byrd Land, where the Thwaites Glacier is located, which is consistent with the presence of a 'major volcanic dome'", which indicates that this is a long-term effect and should not affect the net rate of melting - it would be part of the steady state if we had one.

Despite that the coverage area is still increasing

Again, what is increasing is the maximum sea ice extend. The ice mass balance is strictly negative - i.e. there is more ice melting than water freezing year over year. The amount of ice is going down, by about 70 Gt per year (albeit with large uncertainties), and accelerating.

Comment: Re:Let's see (Score 1) 431

by Stephan Schulz (#49372749) Attached to: Experts: Aim of 2 Degrees Climate Goal Insufficient

Try again http://www.reportingclimatesci...

Total ice covering antarctica expanding despite Geothermal Melting

Want to explain just how atmospheric CO2 triggers vulcanism ?

But please keep on proving Emily Dickinson correct about the perils of an unexamined life.

From your source: "Antarctica as a whole has been shrinking in volume by 125 cubic kilometres a year." Do you read those sources, or do you just google for confirmation using bad search terms?

Comment: Re:No they don't (Score 2) 221

by Immerman (#49371567) Attached to: Chinese Scientists Plan Solar Power Station In Space

>That is incredibly unlikely without some other super-mega sci-fi project like a space elevator.

Or mirrors? A multi-km parabolic orbital mirror can be built out of only thin mylar and a minimal stabilizing structure - with only minor construction, launch, and maintenance costs. You can then use that for extremely large-scale, high concentration photovoltaics, of the sort that just aren't feasible on Earth at almost any price.

As for microwave lasers (aka masers - old enough technology that lasers were originally called "optical masers"), the whole point of using such things is that the atmosphere is almost perfectly transparent to microwaves. Unlike sunlight which sees ~30% losses to atmospheric absorption, microwaves mostly make it all the way to the ground. And then, since you're basically dealing with high-frequency radio waves, further concentration and conversion to electricity is relatively straightforward and efficient.

Comment: Re:No they don't (Score 1) 221

by Immerman (#49371335) Attached to: Chinese Scientists Plan Solar Power Station In Space

Why would you have sunlight shining directly on your orbital panels? That would be stupid, you would be much better off putting them on Earth. What you want to do is put up massive mylar parabolic reflectors, possibly many km across and stabilized by photon pressure and/or gyroscopic effects, that concentrate sunlight onto extremely high-power photovoltaics. Orbital reflectors can cost practically nothing to deploy and maintain, unlike their Earth-side counterparts which must be built strong enough to survive gravity, weather, and life, and will consume land area that could be put to other use or allowed to lie fallow for ecosystem restoration. (especially important for island nations)

And microwave lasers (aka masers - a technology that predates lasers considerably) actually make incredible sense for beaming the power back to Earth, since the atmosphere is extremely transparent to microwaves. Of course even a tightly focused maser will spread out after 36,000km, so you'll need massive receiving antennas on Earth covering many square kilometers, especially if you want to avoid cooking everything in the airspace alive, but power density could easily be many times the palty 1kW/m^2 of sunlight, and microwave mirrors and antennas are a much more rugged, simple, and efficient technology than optical mirrors and photovoltaics.

Plus, if you're willing to put up with the bureaucracy, you can probably get your military interested in testing its potential as an orbital death ray, dramatically improving the funding available for at least the early facilities.

"Success covers a multitude of blunders." -- George Bernard Shaw

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