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Comment: Planet of the Mice (Score 0) 92

by HangingChad (#49143201) Attached to: Xeroxed Gene May Have Paved the Way For Large Human Brain

And that kids is how mice first became intelligent and eventually took over the earth. Later the crew of an earth space ship from the past crashed on earth and were captured by the mice. When one tried to escape the mice netted him and he uttered the classic line, "Get your stinking paws off me you damn dirty mice!"

All the mice really wanted was the recipe for cheese.

Comment: Re:Manufacturers Restrict their Products (Score 4, Insightful) 168

by NReitzel (#49037349) Attached to: NoFlyZone.org Aims To Keep the Airspace Above Your Home Drone-Free

So, what is being suggested is that every drone carry with it every person's address that doesn't want a drone above it?

Doesn't that sound a whole lot like a list of addresses the police would love to have? And if you sign up for this list, then somebody who uses a drone for nefarious purposes will respect this address, as opposed to (say) disabling the GPS receiver?

This is a great idea, because we know that you never get unsolicited cell phone calls from Credit Card Services or "Hi, Seniors..."

This is without a doubt the most ridiculous solution to a problem that doesn't exist that I have ever come across.

So, let me state the obvious, just in case someone has missed it: That genie is out of the bottle, and there's no putting her back in.

Comment: Nothing like Biological (Score 2) 33

To say that "artificial neural networks are nothing like what the biological brain does" is no more correct than to say "artificial neural networks are just like the brain."

Machine learning neural networks do the same flavor of thing that a real organic brain does, but at a complexity that is -many- orders of magnitude smaller. They also tend to be directed at a single skill, and don't have to cohabit the network with, well, everything.

They're not the same, but they're not totally different, either. Truth is not well served by hyperbole.

Comment: New and Modern, Baah Humbug... (Score 1) 263

Axis webcams permit loading a single jpeg, using one of several tools, none of which include their super fancy "look at the webcam" web app.

For example, using the *nix command "curl" gives you a jpeg of what's currently being watched, presto, no grief, no complications.

What you -do- with the jpeg is very much up to you.

I run multiple cameras looking out of my residence, and stuff them into motion jpeg files on a terabyte disk. I use a cron file to change files on an hourly basis, and with the number of cameras I have, I have on hand about four weeks of video coverage. I'm using an atom processor, and the whole affair was cheap and very easy to maintain.

Comment: Don't confuse power production and nuclear weapons (Score 4, Informative) 166

by NReitzel (#48788867) Attached to: Nuclear Waste Accident Costs Los Alamos Contractor $57 Million

The huge (and they _are_ huge) cost of cleanup from places like Hanford has to be understood in the context under which it was created.

The people at Hanford were tasked with creating weapons to kill people, a million at a time. Given that criterion, is it any wonder that they weren't worried about a few salmon, or clean groundwater. They believed at the time that "Nuculer war, toe to toe with the Rooskies" was right around the corner, and they were dealing with the possibility of hundreds of millions of dead. All other reasons just didn't matter.

That turned out not to be the case, but hindsight is always so excellent.

Now, the pendulum has swung so far the other way, we want to clean up Hanford (as an example) well enough that we could build a school on the location. That doesn't seem like a realistic goal. As for a plutonium contaminated waste facility, I should point out that Los Alamos had quite the plutonium problem. They solved it by painting the walls coral - bright bleedin' orange - and then painting over with white paint. The rule was simple - if you see orange, call the safety people. It was (and is) not a perfect solution, but it was (and is) a workable one.

Comment: Re:Minor setback (Score 2) 213

by HangingChad (#48781325) Attached to: SpaceX Rocket Launch Succeeds, But Landing Test Doesn't

What they accomplished was absolutely amazing. Anyone who doesn't get how astonishing just getting that close really was doesn't understand the problem.

There has to be a test range on land somewhere they can try putting one down instead of a pitching platform in the middle of the ocean.

Comment: Pay for priority doesn't work anyway (Score 2) 255

by HangingChad (#48765985) Attached to: FCC Favors Net Neutrality

If Netflix is paying Comcast for priority, they're not getting their money's worth. Lately we've had Netflix stalling and taking forever to load. If Netflix is paying for priority, they're getting ripped off. But, then again, why would Comcast treat Netflix any different than they treat any of their other customers?

When Netflix calls to complain Comcast would try to upsell them on subscription channels after hanging up on them three times.

It is not for me to attempt to fathom the inscrutable workings of Providence. -- The Earl of Birkenhead

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