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Comment: Amazon Glacier for cheap offsite. (Score 5, Informative) 154

by phase_9 (#43325069) Attached to: Happy World Backup Day

Amazon Glacier has really changed my backup strategy since this time last year - I now push all my own, generated content (ie: pictures, documents, things I could never get back if I lost everything) up to Glacier using the free Windows client, Fast Glacier. In February I was charged $0.13 by Amazon for storing ~8Gb of data. I tend to push new content up as and when I create it (for example, after I process holiday snaps, or get back from a day out).

Day to day file changes are now handled by Windows 8's File History feature where my changes are pushed to a small NAS (Dlink DNS-320) in my shed (technically off site?) over a Homeplug AV ethernet link. For added security I use the legacy Windows Backup application (still present in Windows 8) to create ~ monthly snapshots of the system which I store on a 320Gb external HDD. This drive is one of two which go back and forth between my parents house each time I got and visit. These disks are encrypted using Microsoft Bitlocker drive encryption.

I should get around to properly encrypting my NAS in the shed, I've been looking at encfs.

Comment: My own personal hell. (Score 1) 303

by phase_9 (#43300447) Attached to: Geeks On a Plane Proposed To Solve Global Tech Skills Crisis
All fun and games until the guy in front decides to fully recline and you no longer have space to open your laptop. Aside from the usual 'hackathon' merits and drawbacks (personally, I'm not a fan of working flat out over my weekends); why on earth would you want to do this on a plane, in a noisy, cramped environment where you get to breathe in the same recycled air for 9 hours of pure mystery... I mean "fun".

Comment: Re:tick tock (Score 2) 283

by phase_9 (#41146923) Attached to: UK License Plate Cameras Have "Gaps In Coverage"

I never said little residential backroads should be 65 nor did my statements imply it.

No, but your argument was situational awareness, driving skill and vehicle condition prevents accidents - totally omitting 'reducing speed' from the list. It was the 'driving skill' point that made me post a reply to your comment as it's this kind of 'boy racer' attitude which causes so many deaths.

On a road where 25 is truly justified, people will still die at 15. That road needs a major overhaul ... someone's idiot kid gets killed because he didn't look both ways before crossing

This is exactly the reason why speed limits exist and why drivers should not arbitrarily exceed them (whether or not they believe they are skilled enough to do so). Express ways do not have side-walks for a reason; and by the same token, quiet suburban streets are lined with trees - there are places were pedestrians are expected to be, that's all part of the situational awareness. You appear to be trying to attribute the blame onto 'idiot' pedestrians which I find disheartening - should you ever have a fatal road traffic accident and have the weight of some 'idiot kid's' life on your conscience you may re-consider this attitude. Driving is a means of transports, getting from A to B, not some kind of mindless thrill which the killjoys are trying to erode.

Comment: Playstation 3 + PlayTV (Score 2) 479

by phase_9 (#40464205) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Best Way To Watch TV In 2012?

Probably not the most popular answer on Slashdot, and only available to those of us in Europe and Australia; but a Sony Playstation 3 coupled with the Play TV USB TV Tuner addon and PS3 Media Server (an open source DLNA server) makes for one of the best "all-in-one" media center solutions available. A quick rundown of the combined features:

  • Watch and record live TV
  • Stream MKV, MP4, DivX over your home network
  • Lovefilm and Netflix, iPlayer, iTV Player, 4oD all as integrated apps
  • Solid Bluetooth remote control
  • BluRay player (not terribly useful to me...)

Not bad for around £200 - oh and it plays games.

Comment: Re:Youtube (Score 3, Interesting) 82

by phase_9 (#27318349) Attached to: HP's Free Adobe Flash Vulnerability Scanner
I ran this app on my own Flash App (http://moshimonsters.com/) and it produced a plethora of "Vulnerabilities" - and really dangerous ones too like "Interesting Variable Name" (a variable named "masterList") and "Possible userdata information" (a constant named "LOGGED_IN")... To be honest this seems like a lot of FUD being generated by HP - I mean just go look at the dailyWTF and you'll see programmers butting SQL statements in javascript! Still, I must give credit where it's due and thank HP for providing one of the most thorough SWF decompilers I have seen for free.
HP

HP's Free Adobe Flash Vulnerability Scanner 82

Posted by kdawson
from the practicing-safe-flash dept.
Catalyst writes "SWFScan is a free Flash security tool (download here), released by HP Software, which decompiles all versions of Flash and scans them for over 60 security vulnerabilities. The scan detects things like XSS, SQL inside of the Flash app, hard-coded authentication credentials, weak encryption, insecure function calls, cross-domain privilege escalation, and violations of Adobe's security recommendations. There is also this video explaining a real, and amusing, attack against a Flash app. These issues are fairly widespread, with over 35% of SWF applications violating Adobe security advice."
Wine

+ - Running MS Office 2003 on Linux with Wine 0.9.52->

Submitted by
twickline
twickline writes "This is a Office 2003 on Linux with Wine 0.9.52, Guide with lots of nice screenshots and tips. The long standing error"Microsoft Office (Word or Excell) has not been installed for the current user. Please run setup to install the application" has now been properly fixed as of Wine 0.9.52 in addition to many other fixes and enhancements. If you currently use Office 2003 on Linux via Wine this should be considered as a major upgrade."
Link to Original Source
It's funny.  Laugh.

+ - "Oops!" Those dumb mistakes we've all mad 9

Submitted by theotherbastard
theotherbastard (939373) writes "I've recently made the step up from Desktop Support to Systems Administration and in my first month on the job I made a change to a server that knocked one of our customer call centers offline for nearly 4 hours. It was the simple mistake of changing the duplex settings on 2 NIC's on 1 server. Needless to say I've learned my lesson on when and how to make even the smallest change to our sensitive systems. Another thing I've learned is that everyone on my team has a story about their first days supporting servers and the disastrous mistakes they've made. I'm curious what stories some fellow /.er's have."

Serving coffee on aircraft causes turbulence.

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