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Comment: Re:Kind of like supermarket loyalty schemes (Score 1) 346

by Cyberax (#47411401) Attached to: Here Comes the Panopticon: Insurance Companies
Premiums went down in NY where insurers had to offer the same premiums regardless of your health. And of course, insurers have to raise the premiums to cover high-risk people that they earlier simply kicked away. I certainly prefer to pay more and always be able to get insurance then to live in constant fear of losing insurance _forever_ in case of a serious illness.

Comment: Re:Kind of like supermarket loyalty schemes (Score 1) 346

by Cyberax (#47411203) Attached to: Here Comes the Panopticon: Insurance Companies
That's the beauty of large numbers - they average out. And a small insurance pool has to have larger premiums because of the possibility of multiple insurance events.

As I've said, I had a personal example with mandatory insurance. Russia had absolutely no mandatory liability car insurance prior to 2000 and the optional insurance was pretty expensive. As a result lots of people were losing their savings and even houses to pay for damage. A libertarian paradise, in other words.
In 2003 a law mandating car insurance had been enacted. During the first two years, insurance premiums were regulated and only a little bit lower than the optional insurance rates that had been paying before. Then in 2005-2006 premiums fell through the floor - lots of competition and large risk pools.

Comment: Re:Kind of like supermarket loyalty schemes (Score 2, Interesting) 346

by Cyberax (#47409189) Attached to: Here Comes the Panopticon: Insurance Companies
Mandating insurance forces premiums _down_ because the pool of insured people becomes much bigger. By now most car insurances are near the lowest possible values - most car insurance companies are barely profitable. It's not yet true for health insurance, but it's already happening there.

Comment: Re: Two sides to every issue (Score 2) 398

by Cyberax (#47398321) Attached to: No Shortage In Tech Workers, Advocacy Groups Say
We tried a less premium location (San Diego) but we had even worse luck finding good developers for our startup. Talent pool is much less and it's much harder to persuade them to leave their jobs for a small company.

Companies getting H1b-s generally fall into two categories:
1) Companies with crappy jobs designed to allow people to move to the US. These companies are sometimes called 'bodyshops'. Their employees usually work for 6-12 months and then transfer the hell out of them.
2) Good software companies. They generally pay a market rate and often offer relocation assistance.

And even the first kind of companies is restricted by the prevailing wage law, so they pay quite a good wage as a result. Here is the data by state: http://www.myvisajobs.com/Repo... . If you look at California then you can clearly see the divide: http://www.myvisajobs.com/Cali... and you can also see that most of visas go to 'good' companies.

This is an unauthorized cybernetic announcement.

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