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Comment: Re:It's not a marketplace.. (Score 1) 213

by PopeRatzo (#47573587) Attached to: Is the App Store Broken?

And this is the fault of Apple / Google ?

No, it's not the fault of Apple/Google. It's a feature/bug of any bubble market. If you can get in early and score, get out fast and buy real property. Then think about what you're going to do next. Not the other way around.

I bet a lot of those app guys wish they had bought a house with their money instead of renting that warehouse and hiring their WoW clan members to develop the next big app.

Comment: Re:Mod parent DOWN (Score 1) 426

by PopeRatzo (#47571755) Attached to: Jesse Jackson: Tech Diversity Is Next Civil Rights Step

You seem to think the institutions are racist because they wanted some "very sharp" kid to get a GED ?

Not at all. I don't think the institutions are racist at all. I think they saw talent.

And because of (and in some cases, despite) the efforts of people who have fought these fights for many decades, there are now such opportunities. There was a time, not that long ago, in my lifetime in fact, when this young man would have not gotten the opportunity because of the color of his skin and his station in life.

Now his job is to make sure he gets as much out of them as they get out of him. That is the hard fight.

Comment: Re:Equally suspect (Score 1) 229

by hey! (#47571271) Attached to: Amazon's eBook Math

Yes, publishers and middlemen have all kinds of rationalizations for trying to kill e-books, but calling any of them "legitimate" is shilling so hard you could pence a crown.

All the arguments based on classical economic theory only work if the assumptions of classical economics hold, particularly the assumption that there is a free market.

Amazon is arguing for its freedom to set prices it charges in its ebook store; that would be no concern of the publishers if we lived in a world where ebook users could simply buy books in non-proprietary formats from any Internet storefront they wanted. But we don't live in such a world. We live in a world where most ebook readers are controlled by Amazon and inextricably linked to its store. It wouldn't have been hard for Amazon to build the Kindle that way. Define some public book trading protocols, bootstrap the standard by building those protocols into the Kindle and Amazon's online store, and instantly the world is a better place for everyone except printers and bricks-and-mortar bookstores with no Internet presence. But Amazon didn't do that, because the Kindle is designed to tie the user to Amazon, the way the iPad is designed to tie the user to Apple.

So what we're looking at is a maneuver by Amazon to corner the market on books *in general* by killing off the traditional paper book trade. Preserving the ability to buy most books from someone other than Amazon seems like a legitimate reason to me.

Comment: Re:Maybe the author needs to get out more (Score 2) 229

by hey! (#47571143) Attached to: Amazon's eBook Math

No dude, your books are not so incredible that people will buy them no matter what the price.

Nobody's book is so incredible that people would buy them no matter what the price. If my only way to get Shakespeare was to pay a ten thousand dollar license fee I'd find a way to do without.

Authors/publishers/developers/etc need to get over this idea of their digital goods being "worth" a certain amount. No, you need to figure out what you need to do to maximize your profits since there is zero per unit cost. Usually, that is going to mean selling cheap, but selling lots.

You really shouldn't assume that anyone who disagrees with you does so because they're stupid. Publishers know their marginal and fixed costs and certainly have a pretty good idea of the price elasticity of their books. The situation is more complicated than you know.

You can't compare Hachette to Valve, because Valve owns the whole Steam ecosystem, and delivers its services to users' commodity PC hardware with no intermediaries (other than Internet service). In the case of Hachette v. Amazon, we're looking at a situation where Amazon owns the point of sale, and has more control over the users' devices than the user himself has. And yes, you can read ebooks on a PC but few people will want to do that. And yes you can download ebooks in non-proprietary formats like epub from sources other than Amazon, convert the format to .mobi, and use file transfer to move the converted file onto the kindle; but that's a significant barrier for most people.

So what we're looking at is a move by Amazon to take control of the book market in a way it cannot as long as paperback and hardback sales remain strong. Amazon *looks* like a friend of the consumer because they're calling for lower prices. If they get what they want, then ebooks may well make a significant market share headway against paper books.

You might think that's fine, but it's not *generic* formats and *commodity* hardware we're talking about. It's formats and hardware controlled by an inextricably linked to *one* company. And that may mean lower prices today, but what will it mean ten years down the pike when Amazon corners the market on books?

Comment: Re:Stop the idiocracy (Score 1) 425

by hey! (#47570891) Attached to: Jesse Jackson: Tech Diversity Is Next Civil Rights Step

It's urban black culture that disparages intellect.

I'd be interested in your source for this particular tidbit, particularly how it shows blacks are any worse than whites in this regard.

I went to high school with a lot of tough white guys from South Boston and Charlestown in Boston, back when Whitey Bulger was still a big deal in Southie. Let me tell you most of them didn't see intellect as their path into the middle class. A few did, but not many. I've also worked with PhD scientists who were black and came from urban black neighborhoods. You get a mix of attitudes everywhere, whether it's in a black ghetto or white ghetto or a middle-class white neighborhood, but usually being academically advanced doesn't make you popular unless you live in town with a big Jewish population.

Speaking of Whitey, his people used to spread the myth that he kept drugs off the street in Southie. In fact he was kicking the Italian mob out of Southie so he could have the drug trade all to himself. Whitey wasn't a hero, he was a parasite. So why did people believe the lie? Wishful thinking. The people who got education and became professionals moved out of the neighborhood, so the one example of guys who rose in life that you saw every day were the mob. And you had to hope they were good lads at heart, because they had the neighborhood by the balls.

There's often a "we're all in this together" thing going on in poor, downtrodden neighborhoods. Part of that is a resentment of anyone who acts like their above the rest, and that includes people who flaunt their education or sophistication. But that's because intellectual accomplishments don't seem to be within the reach of everybody. You don't get that attitude in cultures which believe in self-improvement.

So let's *not* talk race. Let's talk education and economic opportunity. If people have a way up, see that way, and believe they can do it, they will rise.

Comment: Re:It's not a marketplace.. (Score 1) 213

by PopeRatzo (#47570371) Attached to: Is the App Store Broken?

Yeah, hate that $13 billion *developers* have made so far.

That money's been spent a long time ago. A lot of it on development of more apps that have not been profitable.

Assuming your figure of "$13billion" is correct, of course.

Anyway, this article is about the marketplace, not about the relative handful who have scored big on an app, then hired a staff, invested in their businesses, took venture capital and private equity and now are well and truly fucked.

Comment: Re:Appropriate punishment (Score 1) 248

Why, in theory, build out municipal fiber when internet service is already offered by two respectable private businesses?

Because places have done it and saved the population money and provided better service?

If there's been consolidation to the point where there are only two providers, I completely understand a municipality providing the competition. I lived in a town with municipal power generation. It was cheap and the service excellent. Until a group of Koch-backed corporatists got elected to the county board and privatized the service without public hearings or comment.

Home energy bills doubled within six months.

Comment: Re:Experience outside the valley (Score -1) 426

by PopeRatzo (#47569209) Attached to: Jesse Jackson: Tech Diversity Is Next Civil Rights Step

As a former government worker, I can tell you: no. Its far and above closer to the 75% mark in the public sector.

It just looked like 75% because you find black people so scary.

Fact is, in many government offices, what you're actually seeing is a more representative workforce for the community in which you live. You're not used to seeing that because racism is so pervasive in hiring.

Comment: Re:Mod parent DOWN (Score 0, Offtopic) 426

by PopeRatzo (#47569169) Attached to: Jesse Jackson: Tech Diversity Is Next Civil Rights Step

he wants to shakedown businesses for money for his organization and those of his cronies.

Unlike the Chamber of Commerce or the "Club for Growth"? Or "Americans for Prosperity" or...what's the name of Karl Rove's PAC that had like a 8% success rate..."American Crossroads"?

Cracker, please.

Comment: Re:Mod parent DOWN (Score 3, Interesting) 426

by PopeRatzo (#47569119) Attached to: Jesse Jackson: Tech Diversity Is Next Civil Rights Step

If Jesse wants to wage the next race war, he should start by getting more black kids interested in STEM and education in general

I would keep an eye on that space. Since January, I've visited two very impressive inner-city STEM programs. One's run by the University of Michigan and is in Detroit, of all places, and the other is right here in Chicago, at Lindblom High, run by a friend of mine.

The real interesting part will come in a few years, when these incredibly smart and capable kids start showing up in tech jobs. Then we'll see how many cries of, "affirmative action" we start to hear when a young black kid who grew up in a rough neighborhood gets promoted. We'll learn a little more about whether racism is a thing of the past or not.

Seriously. At the Detroit place (it can't really be called a "school" because it's more of a maker space with a bunch of very sharp faculty), there was a kid who was coming out of the program and he had some very impressive schools recruiting him (but they wanted him to get his G.E.D. first, for some reason). He ended up getting his G.E.D., but then took a job with a well-known tech firm, because why would he go all NCAA, when the pros were calling, you know?

It's going to be an interesting time.

Comment: Re:performance (Score 1) 329

Connection tracking can be expensive. If you need that, it's going to cut into the performance of your server, so it can be beneficial to do that on a separate box.

Of course. But putting your servers behind a separate firewall isn't the same as putting them on the same network as the clients with *no* firewall.

In any case, we're talking about an in-store POS system with TWO clients. We're not talking about an Internet facing server that has to handle thousands of connections per hour. Even if the server had FIFTY client terminals the impact on performance would be nil.

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