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Duke Nukem Forever 'Confirmed' For Late 2008 344

Posted by Zonk
from the funny-weird-not-funny-ha-ha dept.
An anonymous reader writes "A Dallas newspaper is claiming that the long-in-development title Duke Nukem Forever is headed for retail release in late 2008. Unfortunately, game creator 3D Realms says that's not exactly what they meant. 'What the modest Texas newspaper actually seems to suggest is that 3D Realms is "on target" to release the mythical sequel sometime this year, though company president Scott Miller adds, "we may miss the mark by a month or two" (wink, wink). Miller also hinted that "hitting the big three" (in this case, PC, Xbox 360 and PS3) is the obvious development strategy, but he continued to stress that 3D Realms has not "formally announced any platforms for DNF."'"
Television

+ - Why Can't I buy a cablecard ready set top box?-> 1

Submitted by
Al E Usse
Al E Usse writes "Ars Technica does a write up of the problems that haven't been solved by the July 1, 2007 integration ban on integrated security in your cable box. Three months after the ban went into effect, digging up a third-party, CableCARD-ready set-top box can be an exercise in hair-pulling frustration. The companies who make the boxes don't seem interested in selling to consumers, cable companies still push their own branded devices, and Best Buy employees... well, the less said the better. We've heard the pain of our readers on this issue. One of them described his own epic (and fruitless) quest to secure such a device. His conclusion? "Although I should be able to buy a set-top box of my own, nobody will sell me one. I am standing on the doorstep, wad of cash in hand, yelling, 'Please take my money! I want to buy!' but am turned away."
Link to Original Source
Security

+ - Student Who Uncovers Breach Escapes Expulsion->

Submitted by
mikesd81
mikesd81 writes "PC world reports that a student at Western Oregon University who accidentally discovered a file containing personal data on a publicly accessible university server and then handed that data over to the student newspaper has narrowly escaped being expelled for his actions.

Brian Loving, stumbled upon a file containing the names, Social Security numbers and grade point averages of between 50 to 100 students on a publicly accessible university server in June. Loving downloaded a copy of what he discovered and handed it over to the Western Oregon Journal, the campus newspaper. Though the paper's final publication date for the academic year had already passed, it decided to publish a four-page special report with an article describing Loving's discovery. No names of any of the students were published in the article.

Two months into the investigation, Loving — who is now a staffer with the newspaper — was found to have broken a university computer use policy that prohibits unauthorized people from accessing confidential files that may have been inadvertently placed in a publicly accessible location."

Link to Original Source
Space

+ - Scientists await the explosion of Eta Carinae-> 1

Submitted by Urbanator
Urbanator (1011381) writes "According to the Chandra X-Ray observatory, Eta Carinae, a star about 7,500 light years away and 100 to 150 times the mass of the sun is set to explode. If this occurs the star may be light enough to rival a full moon for a short period of time. New composite images of the star are shown, displaying the results of an earlier explosion from the 1840's which caused material about 10 times the mass of the sun to eject from the star and form a nebula around it. Of course for all we know, this explosion may have already happened sometime in the last 7,500 years."
Link to Original Source
Supercomputing

+ - Sun to build 62,976 core Opteron SuperComputer->

Submitted by
mytrip
mytrip writes "Sun Microsystems announced today that its hardware will power the largest supercomputer ever built, weighing in with 62,976 CPU cores, 125 terabytes of memory, 1.7 terabytes of disk space, and 504 teraflops of performance.

The computer, which has been dubbed "Ranger," will be hosted at the Texas Advanced Computing Center at the University of Texas, Austin. It is due to go online on January 1, 2008.

Ranger costs $30 million in hardware alone, and an additional $29 million for staffing and maintenance — and is being entirely funded by a grant from the National Science Foundation.

Under the hood, Ranger's brain will be built from 16,744 quad-core AMD Opteron processors. The machine's production timeline is dependent on how fast AMD can crank out the as-yet-unreleased chips, Bechtolsheim said."

Link to Original Source
Security

+ - CIA Declassifies the "Family Jewels"

Submitted by
An anonymous reader writes "The CIA has recently declassified some records relating to illegal spying, assassination attempts, and other goodies for afternoon reading. These are available from the CIA's FOIA portal
From the article:
Last week, CIA chief Michael Hayden announced the decision to declassify the records, saying the documents were "unflattering but part of CIA history".
The documents detail assassination plots, domestic spying, wiretapping, and kidnapping.
The incidents include:
* the confinement of a Soviet KGB defector, Yuriy Ivanovich Nosenko, in the mid-1960s
* attempts to use a suspected Mafia mobster, Johnny Roselli, in a plot to assassinate Cuba's Fidel Castro
* the wiretapping and surveillance of journalists, including in 1972 columnist Jack Anderson who broke a string of scandals"
Intel

+ - Intel Patches Flaws in Processors 4

Submitted by Nom du Keyboard
Nom du Keyboard (633989) writes "According to this article in The Inquirer and this Microsoft Knowledge Base article, a fix for some significant problems in many of Intel's most recent processors, including Core 2 Duo E4000/E6000, Core 2 Quad Q6600, Core 2 Xtreme X6800, XC6700 and XC6800 has been quietly released. Details on just what has been fixed are scanty (it's called a "reliability update"), however, it's probably more important than either Intel, or Microsoft, is openly admitting. Does this give the feeling of a cover-up?"
First Person Shooters (Games)

+ - EA's Battlefield 2 Stats Blowup

Submitted by Llamakiller-4
Llamakiller-4 (267848) writes "It hasn't had the press of a "World of Warcraft" or "Everquest" breakdown, but one of EA's online jewels, the "Battlefield 2" series is experiencing some severe problems with the managing of their precious Statistics system. A breakdown which has lasted over a week is infuriating players by the thousands and casting skepticism on EA's marketing model for the game. Details are sparse from EA and this is fueling player discontent. Server operators are paying for "ranked" servers licensed thru EA, which allows players to accumulate points for play that are then used to achieve promotions, weapon unlocks etc. Battlefield 2 is a very closeknit community involving large amounts of "clan players" who pay the server operators to help subsidize the cost of their server. EA recently admitted that it's possible that all points accumulated during the Stat Server meltdown period may be lost once the servers are restored. The EA "Battlefield 2" forums are abuzz with complaints and some topics are being locked as a result. This is highlighting the need for gaming companies, which are attempting to create new revenue streams, to maintain those networks and staff against the risk of bad "PR" and having demanding gamers take their money to competitors games."
Privacy

+ - Warrant Now Required For Email Searches By Feds

Submitted by nnkx00
nnkx00 (1006341) writes "Courtesy of the EFF: "The government must have a search warrant before it can secretly seize and search emails stored by email service providers, according to a landmark ruling Monday in the 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals. The court found that email users have the same reasonable expectation of privacy in their stored email as they do in their telephone calls...the government has routinely used the federal Stored Communications Act (SCA) to secretly obtain stored email from email service providers without a warrant." Full Ruling here."

It seems that more and more mathematicians are using a new, high level language named "research student".

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