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Comment Re:So it's not unlimited, then... (Score 2) 301

It's fair to suppose they hate large volume torrenters, but seem to want to cut down on every big user. So, why don't they just limit torrent use and aside from that, leave the plans unlimited for any other use (e.g. constant netflix/hulu/youtube watchers)?

Anyway, 2TB seems pretty big to me. I'm following about a dozen shows at any given time, and, adding all my other internet activities, I hardly ever reach 100GB a month. I'd have to really think hard to come up with legitimate uses (besides home-run public servers, most of which are not allowed on non-business connections anyway) for 20x that data amount.

Comment future? (Score 1) 45

Well, FPGAs being the choice for NN implementations is just as a reiteration as the whole deep learning and convnet field is - which is quite OK, since we have now computational tools and resources that we never had before, thus a lot of the NN/convnet/deeplearning theory suddenly became applicable. However, FPGA implementations of artificial/cellular neural networks and convnets dates back something like 20-25 years now, so it doesn't sit well to suggest it's a new direction. What's new however, is that while they could only do max. ~30 fps template matching with FPGA-based NNs back in the days, on very low resolution images, today's FPGAs are real monsters and we can do a lot more now.

Comment Re:What does Science have to say about this? (Score 1) 587

"Well, I know that in public schools they will compromise the health of the rest of the student body by removing healthy nuts from the menu due to one child's allergy, so I would not be surprised if they required the school to hardwire every classroom."

Well, if they manage to actually reliably prove the kid's electromagnetic intolerance, which I don't think anyone ever could prove before, then yeah, they might make all schools rewire every classroom, plus they'd be the most famous people on the planet.

Comment giving up ... again (Score 1) 515

"This may cost us some amount of privacy, but we'll tend to get something in return: software that can do more things and that works better.

Well, crazy a** stupid. First, one should prove that what they expect us to give up is less than what we can expect to gain. We are _very_ far from that, oh, so very far it's not even funny. Also, I call bollocks on the quoted line of reasoning - what history has taught us repeatedly, so many times over, is that giving up our freedom and privacy for that "something in return" is not worth it.

And well, let's be honest, is Win10 really worth giving up anything? At all? Bleh.

Comment Re:Installer allows you to customize your settings (Score 2) 492

"3: ...on non-Enterprise systems, you cannot disable the forced updates. You can delay them on Pro, but not forever. So eventually, those files are going to find their way back on your system eventually... "

Not really true.

In the Home version, if you set your WIFI connection to be metered in network settings (so they don't download when they want), then use the KB3073930 to hide updates you don't want (also good for stopping some drivers to update), then basically you can delay the updates.

Comment quantity, rather than quality? (Score 1) 365

This issue pops up from time to time, and it's inevitable, if you think about it. As computers bec{a,o}me more available and more accessible to everyone, more people began producing some sort of code with 'easy' tools, churning out truckloads of low quality, unreliable and sometimes even dangerous software. There's not much you can do about it, aside from trying to be informed about the third party software you try to use. Well, it's not like professionals don't produce crap sw, but there's a world of difference there. All we can hope is that in time education will change to include enough general computing knowledge for everyone, that can at least provide some minimal required knowledge level to make further autonomous improvement of abilities easier.

Comment Re:I've had issues with the Win10 NVIDIA drivers.. (Score 1) 317

"Well, whatever they want to label it as now it's still optional."

Well, it is, but there is a huge difference between pick and choose what driver update you want, and enabling or disabling all driver updates. The former is OK, the latter is bollocks.

Comment craptastic (Score 3, Informative) 120

"83 Internet access providers have joined Google to offer gigabit Internet access service (all priced in the $50-$150 per month range)."

Meanwhile, people still pay ~$40 for a 4mbit at&t line. There being lots of smaller regional players providing some service to a limited population doesn't mean crap in the more global view of how things are standing. Reality is, very many cties how only 1 to 3 choices, none of them really good, and absolutely none of them priced realistically. I don't care about statistics, when we can see the reality wit our own eyes.

Comment would hold true in the U.S. (Score 1) 654

"Do you think the same would hold true in the U.S. if a similar program was started?"

I don't think so. Simply because at very many places public transportation is almost non-existent. Granted, I have first hand experience only from 3 states, and second hand reports from 3-4 more, but what I see is some big cities have a somewhat acceptable public transport system, but most of them don't have any, or if they do have some, they only cover some select routes, they run very rarely, and have very small capacity. Plus, even in places where coverage seems acceptable, like maybe SF, the system couldn't handle even an increase of 10-20% (and you have to really think about peak hours), let alone most of the population.

Let's face it, most US cities, regardless of size, simply weren't built with public transportation in mind - and keep in mind, that the larger the city, the longer and the more lines we need, and travel times can be really long. Also, building a good public transport system in a city or region that doesn't have it, or only has bus lines, would cost so much (think under and over ground metro lines, tram lines, trollies), everyone would run away when hearing the costs. Plus, lots of people wouldn't use it even if their lives depended on it.

Comment stop with all the nonsense (Score 1) 504

I really wish all this racism and sexism debates would just stop. These days it's almost impossible to find any review of any movie that doesn't only deal with these topics, and only very few actually concentrate on whether the movie was any good from an artistic point of view. Most of the time I don't care if directors add or remove or change certain characters to fit the crowds newfound interest in recist and sexist topics, but only to the point where it still keeps the point of the movie and reflects the intentions of the writers. I find all these idiotically overcompensated angry and pointless rants and quarrels about gender and race bias issues (which, most of the time, seem simply made up) a real turnoff, driving me not to even try to read movie reviews for almost a year now. It seems that nowadays we've reached a point, where whatever the movie's topic and whaveter the cast, however good or bad it is, the only thing you can read about is whether there have been enough female and/or minority and/or etc characters in it. Well, I don't give a flying f*, until the movie is good, and I give the same amount of f* to all the idiotic opinion pieces about feminism, masculism, chauvinism, racism, sexism, whateverism.

Comment idiots (Score 1) 394

"Whatever downsides it has, if such a design is adopted, ..."

Well, if such a design is adopted, all long haul flights would fly with empty economy sections if all people would be normal, which they are not. There are always enough people to accept everything like sheep, and the flights would go on.

But, I have a better idea. Make everyone take sleeping pills before boarding, then put handcuffs on them and hang them up on meathooks. Bet you could fit 3-4x people.

As things are going these days, demand for cruise ship tickets might just see a steady increase.

Comment looking back (Score 1) 387

"and I wonder what other Slashdotters think, looking back on Win 3"

I was already well in my coding years when it came out. Seen it, used it, only thing I can say about it is good riddance. Would I care to elaborate? Not really. The only point of view from which the whole topic is somewhat interesting [for me] is software history. Oh, maybe a little bit of nostalgia of childhood comes attached, but with not much connection with Win3. Anyway, I'm not missing crap just because of some "good old times" feeling. They had to start somewhere, but I'm not sad it's long gone.

Comment obvious much? (Score 1) 414

"the cost of maintaining any body of code over time is in maintenance"

No, really? The cost of maintaining is in maintenance? Well, now that's some earth shattering surprise.

Anyway, the intention was probably to say that maintaining is more costly than creating. However, since it says "any body of code" I'll just call it the deepest bullcrap. I've seen and heard lots of people talking out of their behinds over the years dismissing the effort going into creating some really nice algorithms and realizing them in applicable and useful code, simply thinking about the whole process as "coding" which is usually the easiest part. Also, maintenance costs a lot mostly when the coder monkeys hacking the code together were crap in the first place. Just stop paying outrageous amounts of money to idiots who put together unmaintainable code and then leave to another company to do this again and again, and by the time their code needs "maintenance" they're already gone and couldn't care less.

When a fellow says, "It ain't the money but the principle of the thing," it's the money. -- Kim Hubbard

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