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Comment: Re:What a load of crap (Score 1) 755

by kthreadd (#49064335) Attached to: Removing Libsystemd0 From a Live-running Debian System

I really don't understand what the problem is. Do you even know what libsystemd is? It's not systemd and it does not force you to run systemd. You can have it installed and still have a completely systemd-free experience. This is *only* a problem if you can't live with having a single package with systemd in its name installed.

Comment: Re:Red Hat Network (Score 2) 755

by kthreadd (#49062477) Attached to: Removing Libsystemd0 From a Live-running Debian System

The other day I found out that it's impossible to use yum on a Red Hat machine with an expired RHN subscription. It proved quite unpleasant to work my way around it, as wget was not installed.

Of course you should have a valid subscription, otherwise you won't get security updates. It happens every now and then that I run into people that run five year old RHEL installations which they have never updated because they either are too cheap to pay for it or have never heard about CentOS.

Pretty soon we'll need a valid subscription to start daemons, something made possible by "improvements" like systemd.

It don't understand how you made that conclusion.

This subscription model is becoming quite the rage (Microsoft, Adobe, Red Hat, etc) and this is leading real fast to absurd situations like in the novel from Philip K. Dick (Ubik) where the guy has to pay a few dimes each time he wants to use the door of his apartment.

You have to pay if you want to continue to get binary software from Red Hat, you can always get it in source form even if you're not under a subscription.

Comment: Re:Choice is good. (Score 2, Insightful) 755

by kthreadd (#49062183) Attached to: Removing Libsystemd0 From a Live-running Debian System

However, the fact that systemd comes with the "USE US OR FAIL!" dire warning (cf "if you don't use Windows, you can't use our ISP") and appears entirely engineered to intefere with everything on a Linux system, no matter how divorced from SETTING UP THE OS it is indicates that the proponents of systemd have one of two aims:

This article isn't even about systemd. You can fairly easily use Debian without systemd. This is about libsystemd which is a small library for interfacing with systemd if it is installed. It doesn't depend on systemd so you can have it installed without having systemd itself installed.

Comment: Re:What a load of crap (Score 2) 755

by kthreadd (#49062097) Attached to: Removing Libsystemd0 From a Live-running Debian System

This is not even about systemd, it's a about libsystemd which is just a library for interfacing with systemd. You can have libsystemd installed and still don't have systemd itself installed. Debian has built some of their packages so that they depend on libsystemd, so installing them will bring libsystemd with them. Not a problem if you don't want to run systemd, but if you for some reason can't live with dpkg-query -l | grep systemd printing even a single line then this is apparently a problem.

Comment: Re:Choice is good. (Score 1) 755

by kthreadd (#49062035) Attached to: Removing Libsystemd0 From a Live-running Debian System

I think it is rather obvious that there should be a way to have more options. Competition is good, choice is good. Can't someone fork a version without systemd? Also, note that other distribution, like Slackware, don't depend on systemd, but the pressure is mounting.

It's important to realize that this article is not about systemd, it's about libsystemd which is not systemd. It's a library that is used as an interface to systemd, and Debian has built some of it's packages to depend on it. Note that having libsystemd installed in no ways means that you have systemd installed. It's just a library that won't do anything if systemd itself is not installed.

Documentation is the castor oil of programming. Managers know it must be good because the programmers hate it so much.

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