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Comment: Re:Times have changed (Score 1) 154

by jrumney (#48201421) Attached to: GNU Emacs 24.4 Released Today

I expect the predominant use pattern for editors (in a console) is to be fired up to quickly to edit a file, save and exit, e.g. to commit files in source control. Longer term activity has moved out to the desktop and editors / IDEs running there - the likes of Eclipse, Notepad++, Sublime Text, Gedit etc.

And since that was an issue with Emacs around 20 years ago, emacsclient exists, to load the file into an already running instance of Emacs, but otherwise act as a console editor is expected to (hanging around until the edit is finished). But on any modern machine, Emacs starts pretty much instantly with a warm cache, and in a couple of seconds at most with a cold cache, so starting Emacs for a quick edit really isn't the issue you think it is any more.

Comment: Re:Start rant here (Score 1) 154

by jrumney (#48195145) Attached to: GNU Emacs 24.4 Released Today

Or if you work on projects with different coding styles, use a .dir-locals.el file:

((nil . ((tab-width . 4)
(c-line-comment-starter . "// ")))
(c-mode . ((c-file-style . "bsd")
(c-basic-offset . 4))))

PS: where's the help link that tells you what "allowed HTML tags" are for Slashdot comments? I'm sure there used to be one, and I'm sure you used to be able to format code properly.

Comment: Re:Start rant here (Score 1) 154

by jrumney (#48195013) Attached to: GNU Emacs 24.4 Released Today

Emacs, like every other text editor I've ever seen, actually does (2). A tab character always indents to the next tab stop. By default, there is a tab stop every 8 characters. When all your tabs are at the start of a line, as is typical in a programming environment, the effect may look the same as (1), but try typing the following key sequence in Emacs, or any other editor which you think does (1), and see what the result is:

TAB x ENTER
SPACE TAB x

It is wrong always, everywhere and for everyone to believe anything upon insufficient evidence. - W. K. Clifford, British philosopher, circa 1876

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